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(NPR)   Quantum computer may or may not be quantum computer. Well, of course   (npr.org) divider line 18
    More: Obvious, quantum, quantum computer, dumb laws, qubits, Amherst College, absolute zero, electromagnets, quantum states  
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18 Comments   (+0 »)
   

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2013-05-22 12:25:51 PM
www.squidmobile.com
 
2013-05-22 12:49:56 PM
Ok, I laughed
 
2013-05-22 01:08:50 PM
It's a start and we need starts to any new computing platform if it's to be properly vetted. By 2020 we'll be seeing QC as being something that is somewhat easily attainable for corporations. We're already working with Quantum Encryption in my companies security division and that's also in it's infancy. Between computing and communication (faster than light speed) we're going to see some amazing progress between 2020-2030 that will continue Moores Law. We'll need that stuff to manage the amazing amount of data that will be around by that time. We expect 250 organizations to be Exabyte or larger in data holdings by then. Which will demand advances in quantum storage where you'll be able to store a petabyte of information on a 1ct diamond - literally.

Awesome industry to work in by the way.. I love this shiat!
 
2013-05-22 01:11:10 PM
The Schrodinger's Cat analogy is often misunderstood -- it's not that the cat "may or may not" be alive, it's that it is both alive and dead simultaneously until the box is opened and the state observed.
 
2013-05-22 01:37:14 PM
It all depends on whether it's a quantum computer.
 
2013-05-22 01:41:43 PM
welcome my son
toooo the machiiiiine
Where have you been?
It's alright we know were you've been.

/shiat and I'm still using 64 bits
 
2013-05-22 01:46:56 PM
Farking magnets.
 
2013-05-22 01:51:02 PM
Alive or dead, my cat is always hungry.
 
2013-05-22 01:54:32 PM
Schrodinger's Dog

Remember reality works even if you are not observing it.

/bark
 
2013-05-22 02:05:02 PM
It's a computer that utilizing quantum annealing to solve a very specific set of problems appreciably faster than traditional compters. It's not a "true" quantum computer in that it does not utilize a universal gate model.

So it's both. Or neither.
 
2013-05-22 02:12:27 PM

xynix: We'll need that stuff to manage the amazing amount of data that will be around by that time.


When will people learn to stop data hoarding? Or is that part of the delusional model building of modern business here to stay until someone else shakes the paradigm?
 
2013-05-22 02:20:36 PM
This is exactly what my comment said when the article about Google buying the computer for NASA came up.

It performs a single mathematical function using a processor built based on quantum physics/effect.

I work for a quantum computing institute and most researchers here would say it is not a true quantum computer.

Does it assist with certain calculations and research?  Absolutely.  Does it play Crysis or can it bet on horse racing for a win?  nope.
 
2013-05-22 02:34:21 PM
www.robotinthecloud.com


http://www.robotinthecloud.com/data/images/2010/03/tumblr-kz6hvwghii1 q z5i2go1-500.png
 
2013-05-22 02:45:26 PM

xynix: We're already working with Quantum Encryption in my companies security division and that's also in it's infancy. Between computing and communication  (faster than light speed) we're going to see some amazing progress between 2020-2030 that will continue Moores Law.


*Emphasis mine*

No.

NO.

You cannot use qmech for FTL communication. Yes, I know what Spooky-Action-At-A-Distance/Quantum Entanglement is. But you cannot actually use it to *send information*, and it does not work like most people THINK it works. (If I fiddle with one quantum entangled bit, it does not alter the final *state* of  the other quatum entangled bit, it just collapses the wave-function, and there isn't, I'm fairly certain, a way to check if the wave function has actually collapsed or not).

I could explain further with an analogy using an expansion of Schroedinger's Cat, if you'd like.

/Quantum Encryption IS fascinating, though. A secure method of transmitting a one-time-pad is pretty farking unbeatable.
 
2013-05-22 03:05:08 PM

Donnchadha: The Schrodinger's Cat analogy is often misunderstood -- it's not that the cat "may or may not" be alive, it's that it is both alive and dead simultaneously until the box is opened and the state observed.


Ssshh... Most people here learned everything they know about physics from xkcd.
 
2013-05-22 03:10:50 PM

Donnchadha: The Schrodinger's Cat analogy is often misunderstood -- it's not that the cat "may or may not" be alive, it's that it is both alive and dead simultaneously until the box is opened and the state observed.


It was also initially forwarded for why the probabilistic model of quantum mechanics MUST be wrong (Unless I'm remembering wrongly? Doing research on 4 hours of sleep, WHEEEEE), and that there must be a hidden variable theorem somewhere, because the idea of a cat in a super-position state was *meant* to be an absurdity.
 
2013-05-22 04:13:14 PM
If you would like to know more, please give a visit here for some videos (some of this stuff actually requires heavy knowledge in various areas of math, physics etc...)  http://www.youtube.com/user/QuantumIQC
 
2013-05-22 06:45:15 PM

Felgraf: xynix: We're already working with Quantum Encryption in my companies security division and that's also in it's infancy. Between computing and communication  (faster than light speed) we're going to see some amazing progress between 2020-2030 that will continue Moores Law.

*Emphasis mine*

No.

NO.

You cannot use qmech for FTL communication. Yes, I know what Spooky-Action-At-A-Distance/Quantum Entanglement is. But you cannot actually use it to *send information*, and it does not work like most people THINK it works. (If I fiddle with one quantum entangled bit, it does not alter the final *state* of  the other quatum entangled bit, it just collapses the wave-function, and there isn't, I'm fairly certain, a way to check if the wave function has actually collapsed or not).

I could explain further with an analogy using an expansion of Schroedinger's Cat, if you'd like.

/Quantum Encryption IS fascinating, though. A secure method of transmitting a one-time-pad is pretty farking unbeatable.


Could you explain it with the cat being hurled across the room at FTL speeds?

I prefer Schrodinger's goldfish. They have a 50% chance of being dead when I look at them anyway. No radioactivity needed. And I could throw them faster too. Why do scientists have to make everything so complicated? Flip a coin to describe how it works. You don't know the state except for when you measure it and then the result is fixed. No need to go on about dead cats in boxes with poison and radiation. That's some sick stuff right there.
 
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