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(NBC News)   Louisville offering classes in making moonshine; bathtub gin production triples   (nbcnews.com) divider line 32
    More: Amusing, Louisville, Brown-Forman, Jones Soda  
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1859 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 May 2013 at 9:31 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-22 09:34:12 AM
"Would you like some Merlot? I make it in the toilet."
img62.imageshack.us
 
2013-05-22 09:34:22 AM
Mmm, nothing better than a soap-scum martini, extra dry.
 
2013-05-22 09:35:06 AM
OK, now pony up the tens of thousands of dollars in taxes and fees you need to pay, in order to have a legal still... Because now the Revenuer Man knows exactly who you are.

Home distillation needs to be legal in this country. It never will be, because the government likes money, but it should be.
 
2013-05-22 09:38:17 AM
Negro, please.  We have a town nearby with a working moonshine still next to the city manager's office.

onlineathens.com

Extra bonus: there is a NASCAR museum and tacky gift shop in there as well.
 
2013-05-22 09:39:34 AM
s16.postimg.org
 
2013-05-22 09:41:43 AM

Gonz: OK, now pony up the tens of thousands of dollars in taxes and fees you need to pay, in order to have a legal still... Because now the Revenuer Man knows exactly who you are.

Home distillation needs to be legal in this country. It never will be, because the government likes money, but it should be.


I don't trust the common man to pour piss out of a boot. I'm sure not going to trust him to run a pot-still without blowing up his house, and maybe catching mine on fire in the process.
 
2013-05-22 09:42:11 AM

SovietCanuckistan: "Would you like some Merlot? I make it in the toilet. turlit"
[img62.imageshack.us image 200x266]


there, better
 
2013-05-22 09:42:49 AM

give me doughnuts: I don't trust the common man to pour piss out of a boot. I'm sure not going to trust him to run a pot-still without blowing up his house, and maybe catching mine on fire in the process.


By that same logic we should ban turkey fryers
 
2013-05-22 09:43:57 AM
I'd rather they were making their own gin than meth.
 
2013-05-22 09:44:00 AM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: [s16.postimg.org image 596x644]


I like to see people enjoying the Commonwealth's number-one cash crop.
Little kid rolls a pretty good blunt.
(you don't really think there's tobacco in that Prince Albert can, do you?)
 
2013-05-22 09:45:44 AM

Gonz: OK, now pony up the tens of thousands of dollars in taxes and fees you need to pay, in order to have a legal still... Because now the Revenuer Man knows exactly who you are.

Home distillation needs to be legal in this country. It never will be, because the government likes money, but it should be.


From the alcohol tax and trade bureau:

S3: I've seen ads for home distilling equipment in catalogs ("turn wine into brandy," "make your own essential oils"). Is it legal to buy and use a still like that?
Under Federal rules administered by TTB, it depends on how you use the still. You may not produce alcohol with these stills unless you qualify as a distilled spirits plant (see earlier question). However, owning a small still and using it for other purposes is allowed. You should also check with your State and local authorities - their rules may differ.

http://www.ttb.gov/spirits/faq.shtml#s3
 
2013-05-22 09:46:23 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: give me doughnuts: I don't trust the common man to pour piss out of a boot. I'm sure not going to trust him to run a pot-still without blowing up his house, and maybe catching mine on fire in the process.

By that same logic we should ban turkey fryers


Not a bad notion.
Although I do enjoy the fried turkey. That initial sear really seals in the juices. Better than basting for keeping the bird moist.
 
2013-05-22 10:01:46 AM

give me doughnuts: I don't trust the common man to pour piss out of a boot. I'm sure not going to trust him to run a pot-still without blowing up his house, and maybe catching mine on fire in the process.


Meh, I'm 6th generation shiner.
No blow ups.
Just a quiet little spot by the creek and you can hardly hear the thump rod from the road.
 
2013-05-22 10:03:35 AM
t1.gstatic.com
Approves.
 
2013-05-22 10:07:15 AM

give me doughnuts: Although I do enjoy the fried turkey. That initial sear really seals in the juices. Better than basting for keeping the bird moist.


At least now the safer encased fryers are on the market

Last Nov, we had someone in our hood set their garage on fire because they forget to thaw the bird first
 
2013-05-22 10:07:24 AM
It's a really weird industry to break into.  I've read stories from folks who tried to start their own distillery.  Most of their stories involved hundreds of thousands of dollars of upfront costs before they could make a single drop of alcohol, and just breaking even is considered a success.  As much as I think it would be neat to make my own whiskey, it's probably easiest to just purchase bulk "neutral grain spirits" and age it myself.
 
2013-05-22 10:12:04 AM
Ready the catapult

/I'll get you beer baron!

No you won't

Yes I will

Doh!
 
2013-05-22 10:13:12 AM

Curt Blizzah: [t1.gstatic.com image 275x183]
Approves.


came here for this
 
2013-05-22 10:22:11 AM

hstein3: It's a really weird industry to break into.  I've read stories from folks who tried to start their own distillery.  Most of their stories involved hundreds of thousands of dollars of upfront costs before they could make a single drop of alcohol, and just breaking even is considered a success.  As much as I think it would be neat to make my own whiskey, it's probably easiest to just purchase bulk "neutral grain spirits" and age it myself.


You ever watch Moonshiners?  Ironically, the main guy had to increase his illegal output in order to raise enough funds so that he could go legit!
 
2013-05-22 10:30:15 AM

hstein3: It's a really weird industry to break into.  I've read stories from folks who tried to start their own distillery.  Most of their stories involved hundreds of thousands of dollars of upfront costs before they could make a single drop of alcohol, and just breaking even is considered a success.  As much as I think it would be neat to make my own whiskey, it's probably easiest to just purchase bulk "neutral grain spirits" and age it myself.


Neutral Grain Spirits aren't really whiskey. It's vacuum distilled ethanol with absolutely ZERO flavor contributed by the grain bill or yeast. Whiskey implies that it retains at least some character from the grains used.

Age everclear and you just get woody-tasting brown everclear.

Hobby distillers are all but legal in this country. The TTB and BATFE have much bigger fish to fry than Johnny boy who is making a gallon at a time and either consuming it himself or giving it away to friends. What they want is the tax on the SALE of said product. They'd rather nail the guy doing it for money than mess with the guys doing it for fun and knowledge.

As for not trusting Joe-Public to not blow up his house, so long as they even barely look at one of the many home-distilling websites or books out there, they'll know to use a hot plate or hot water heater element to fire their still.

Finally, using the old "paste" method to seal leaks in your still is crap. Nitrile rubber bands are AWESOME for that job, a la the PDA-1 from Amphora Society (okay reflux still. I'd rather a traditional pot).
 
2013-05-22 10:42:22 AM

tallen702: Hobby distillers are all but legal in this country. The TTB and BATFE have much bigger fish to fry than Johnny boy who is making a gallon at a time and either consuming it himself or giving it away to friends. What they want is the tax on the SALE of said product.


That's my point, though- just because it's unlikely that BATF will mess with you, it doesn't mean it's impossible. Some agent could get a hair to check out a guy who bought, say, turbo yeast from the local homebrew store, or a copy of the Alaska Bootlegger's Bible, or something. And while the hobby distiller may not have sold a drop of his product, he could still be looking at fines and jail time.

Just because a law's not generally enforced, that doesn't mean it never will be. And it's not like it would be impossible to imagine government agencies searching for additional revenue streams in this day and age.
 
2013-05-22 10:52:04 AM
tallen702 pretty much sums it up.

My buddy just got into the hobby and is noodling around with retaining the character of the grains for flavorful 'shine.  His long-term plan is experiment with small-barrel aging and see how that goes.

/We brewed beer together years ago, but fell out of the hobby.
 
2013-05-22 11:27:35 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: give me doughnuts: I don't trust the common man to pour piss out of a boot. I'm sure not going to trust him to run a pot-still without blowing up his house, and maybe catching mine on fire in the process.

By that same logic we should ban turkey fryers


Actually there's nothing more to it than there is to boiling a pot of water with the top on it. So ban cooking.
 
2013-05-22 11:32:01 AM

SovietCanuckistan: "Would you like some Merlot? I make it in the toilet."


See, that's the thing- the government doesn't car if you make Merlot. The law says you can make 100 gallons a year (200 if you don't live alone), and it's not like they really keep close tabs on you. So, it's got nothing to do with the alcohol.

But if I take one single gallon out of my 200, heat it up, cool the steam, and turn it into brandy, then I'm suddenly a dangerous criminal who owes a punitive tax liability.

That doesn't make sense.
 
2013-05-22 11:38:01 AM

boarch: Actually there's nothing more to it than there is to boiling a pot of water with the top on it. So ban cooking.


Given how bad some people cook, that could come in handy
 
2013-05-22 11:50:57 AM

Gonz: hat's my point, though- just because it's unlikely that BATF will mess with you, it doesn't mean it's impossible. Some agent could get a hair to check out a guy who bought, say, turbo yeast from the local homebrew store, or a copy of the Alaska Bootlegger's Bible, or something. And while the hobby distiller may not have sold a drop of his product, he could still be looking at fines and jail time.

Just because a law's not generally enforced, that doesn't mean it never will be. And it's not like it would be impossible to imagine government agencies searching for additional revenue streams in this day and age.


I actually had the LCB commish stop by one day but he was looking for directions.
He had no idea I was making shine right out back.
 
2013-05-22 12:20:02 PM

Gonz: SovietCanuckistan: "Would you like some Merlot? I make it in the toilet."

See, that's the thing- the government doesn't car if you make Merlot. The law says you can make 100 gallons a year (200 if you don't live alone), and it's not like they really keep close tabs on you. So, it's got nothing to do with the alcohol.

But if I take one single gallon out of my 200, heat it up, cool the steam, and turn it into brandy, then I'm suddenly a dangerous criminal who owes a punitive tax liability.

That doesn't make sense.


I have brewed wine, and as long as you don't sell any of those 100 gallons it's legal (in Ohio (IANNAL)). I didn't know further distilling it was illegal.  I hope distilling vinegar is legal.
 
2013-05-22 12:30:41 PM

IdBeCrazyIf: boarch: Actually there's nothing more to it than there is to boiling a pot of water with the top on it. So ban cooking.

Given how bad some people cook, that could come in handy



I resemble this remark.

Gonz: SovietCanuckistan: "Would you like some Merlot? I make it in the toilet."

See, that's the thing- the government doesn't car if you make Merlot. The law says you can make 100 gallons a year (200 if you don't live alone), and it's not like they really keep close tabs on you. So, it's got nothing to do with the alcohol.

But if I take one single gallon out of my 200, heat it up, cool the steam, and turn it into brandy, then I'm suddenly a dangerous criminal who owes a punitive tax liability.

That doesn't make sense.


You can own some household cleaners, over the counter allergy medicines, and agricultural supplies, but if you combine them in a certain way, then suddenly you're a dangerous criminal.
 
2013-05-22 12:39:42 PM

Gonz: tallen702: Hobby distillers are all but legal in this country. The TTB and BATFE have much bigger fish to fry than Johnny boy who is making a gallon at a time and either consuming it himself or giving it away to friends. What they want is the tax on the SALE of said product.

That's my point, though- just because it's unlikely that BATF will mess with you, it doesn't mean it's impossible. Some agent could get a hair to check out a guy who bought, say, turbo yeast from the local homebrew store, or a copy of the Alaska Bootlegger's Bible, or something. And while the hobby distiller may not have sold a drop of his product, he could still be looking at fines and jail time.

Just because a law's not generally enforced, that doesn't mean it never will be. And it's not like it would be impossible to imagine government agencies searching for additional revenue streams in this day and age.


It's harder than that though. They can only get you for transport and production and essentially any judge out there is going to look at the volume being produced if you aren't selling it and slap them on the wrist.

Various agencies have contacted places like homedistiller.org et al, and essentially told them they're only interested in the big boys, so if they cooperate, they'll cooperate.

Honestly, I'd put current hobby distillation numbers right around where home brew and home wine making were just prior to the legalization in the 70's. The problem with recent attempts to make it legal haven't really been money or legal issues, but rather the fact that introduced legislation has been too vague or simply poorly written. In short, they don't define what hobby distillation is, how much product can be made per person per household per year, that stills must meet certain requirements for hobby use (i.e. non-flammable heat sources only) that transport is illegal other than for personal or competitive use, and that it can't be sold.

The local HB store between DC and Baltimore (mdhb) sells stills out in the open on the shop floor. Nobody cares.

If some LEO decides to bust you because they've got a hair up their butt, you've got bigger problems than unlicensed liquor distillation penalties.
 
2013-05-22 01:30:56 PM

TheGogmagog: I have brewed wine, and as long as you don't sell any of those 100 gallons it's legal (in Ohio (IANNAL)). I didn't know further distilling it was illegal.


Here's a fun little thought experiment for you, and it kind of demonstrates the ridiculousness of the situation: Imagine a gallon bucket of your homemade wine in your freezer (or, in Ohio, on your back porch in January). Every few hours, you reach in the bucket and pull out the ice that's formed. Repeat until there's very little ice forming any more.

That process is called "jacking", and if you do it to hard cider, it's how you make applejack.

It's also illegal.

tallen702: Honestly, I'd put current hobby distillation numbers right around where home brew and home wine making were just prior to the legalization in the 70's... If some LEO decides to bust you because they've got a hair up their butt, you've got bigger problems than unlicensed liquor distillation penalties.


That's what I'm saying, though- people are doing it. People are doing it fairly openly. As long as you have half a lick of common sense, it would seem to be fairly safe and rather easy. And still, there exists the possibility of a huge hassle if somebody in law enforcement decided to get froggy.
 
2013-05-22 01:57:34 PM

Gonz: TheGogmagog: I have brewed wine, and as long as you don't sell any of those 100 gallons it's legal (in Ohio (IANNAL)). I didn't know further distilling it was illegal.

Here's a fun little thought experiment for you, and it kind of demonstrates the ridiculousness of the situation: Imagine a gallon bucket of your homemade wine in your freezer (or, in Ohio, on your back porch in January). Every few hours, you reach in the bucket and pull out the ice that's formed. Repeat until there's very little ice forming any more.

That process is called "jacking", and if you do it to hard cider, it's how you make applejack.

It's also illegal.

tallen702: Honestly, I'd put current hobby distillation numbers right around where home brew and home wine making were just prior to the legalization in the 70's... If some LEO decides to bust you because they've got a hair up their butt, you've got bigger problems than unlicensed liquor distillation penalties.

That's what I'm saying, though- people are doing it. People are doing it fairly openly. As long as you have half a lick of common sense, it would seem to be fairly safe and rather easy. And still, there exists the possibility of a huge hassle if somebody in law enforcement decided to get froggy.


Gotcha.

Also, I tried working on a piece of legislation for a hobby distillation bill, but work caught up with my free time and I haven't touched it for months. I even went so far as to make sure there were safety nets in the bill that would prevent the feds from charging you with the crime of "carrying a firearm while engaged in distilling" for merely having guns in the house or shed where the act of distillation was taking place. I set the pp/phh yearly limit at 100/200 gallons of mash or must for the express purposes of distillation per year. That falls right in line with the personal/household limits for home brew and home wine making. Besides, if you need more than 5 or 10 gallons of finished product per year, for personal consumption you've got other problems.

Good thing is, slow season kicks into high gear in 3 more weeks, so I guess I'll get back on it when I get a chance.
 
2013-05-22 02:36:53 PM
tallen, EIP. I'd like to help on that, and I think I know some people who can get it in the right hands.

//Seriously.
 
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