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(Pacific Standard Magazine)   New study shows massive jump in amount teenagers are willingly sharing online, growing amount of yelling at their parents for looking at the information, plus an increase in door slammings   (psmag.com) divider line 37
    More: Scary, Internet privacy, social context, First Monday, focus groups, Pew Research Center  
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3210 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 May 2013 at 9:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-22 09:52:40 AM
Followed by an intensifying need to GET.THE.FARK.OFFA.MAH.LAWN.
 
2013-05-22 09:53:48 AM
Kids today are disrespectful brats. Worse than ever.
 
2013-05-22 09:55:19 AM
Yes because obviously if you set something to friends only, there is absolutely no way that information could EVER be obtained or viraled out to the rest of the internet.

God we're raising a bunch of farking morons
 
2013-05-22 09:59:37 AM
FTA: The joint paper  ...

Stopped reading there. Clearly the studiers were affected by marijuana.
 
2013-05-22 10:00:23 AM
As some 19y/o who met his future wife in the mid 90's when she was 15 on a local BBS, yeah, I'm all up on my teenage daughter's phone/computer/nook and what she is doing and trying help her keep things private as much as possible, thankyouverymuch. I can't keep it all private, but at least I can teach her how to avoid stupid mistakes that can haunt her the rest of her life.
 
2013-05-22 10:02:18 AM

Petey4335: As some 19y/o who met his future wife in the mid 90's when she was 15 on a local BBS, yeah, I'm all up on my teenage daughter's phone/computer/nook and what she is doing and trying help her keep things private as much as possible, thankyouverymuch. I can't keep it all private, but at least I can teach her how to avoid stupid mistakes that can haunt her the rest of her life.


Like marrying a fifteen year old she met on the internet?
 
2013-05-22 10:03:13 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Kids today are disrespectful brats. Worse than ever.


"The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt forauthority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in placeof exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of theirhouseholds. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. Theycontradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up daintiesat the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.ATTRIBUTION: Attributed to SOCRATES by Plato, according to William L.Patty and Louise S. Johnson, Personality and Adjustment, p. 277(1953)."
 
2013-05-22 10:03:19 AM
teenagers are farking stupid
 
2013-05-22 10:04:06 AM
Parents need to beat their children more.
 
2013-05-22 10:08:56 AM
30.media.tumblr.com

"Have you ever tried simply turning off the TV, sitting down with your children, and hitting them?"
 
2013-05-22 10:11:23 AM
News report a few weeks ago (can't remember the station off hand) here had a reporter going door to door asking people if they knew their kids were sharing location info when sharing random crap online.  Funny part was when the parents would start yelling at their kids while slamming the door in the reporters face.  The parents should be more upset at themselves for letting their little snowflakes broadcast shiat world wide in their own house.
 
2013-05-22 10:12:10 AM
Welcome to 1984.
 
2013-05-22 10:13:52 AM
followed by IHATEYOUIHATEYOUIHATEYOU...

/glad I have only fur children to worry about - they talk back enough
/German Shepherd owner
 
2013-05-22 10:17:39 AM
In my house, you slam the door, the door is removed. Only has to happen once for them to learn!
 
2013-05-22 10:36:50 AM

marleymaniac: In my house, you slam the door, the door is removed. Only has to happen once for them to learn!


This. You don't slam doors in my house unless you contribute to the mortgage.

/Hint: I pay the mortgage
 
2013-05-22 10:38:42 AM
Set profile to "viewable by friends only".

Do not add as a friend:
-- your parents
-- siblings who regularly talk about your private life with your parents
-- your boss
-- your co-workers on whom you do not have your own blackmail material

There, done.  That's all you need to secure your private information at a level where casual snoops won't get into it. As a teenager or young adult, that's pretty much all you need.

marleymaniac: In my house, you slam the door, the door is removed. Only has to happen once for them to learn!


That must have been hell on your heating bill the first time one of them stormed out to spend the night with a friend or something.
 
2013-05-22 10:43:17 AM

marleymaniac: In my house, you slam the door, the door is removed. Only has to happen once for them to learn!


And what it hey are smart asses who slam your bedroom door? Or the front door? Are you going to be consistent?

/Obviously they wouldn't slam there own door more than once because it has been removed.
 
2013-05-22 10:44:50 AM
We taught our kids from day 1 the perils of sharing information online.  They're in high school now and still don't have any social media presence by my demand, and now their choice.  They have seen some of their friends embarrass themselves, get in trouble, and were shocked at the sheer stupidity of what is being voluntarily released in posts.

My oldest just turned 16 and I asked if wanted a FB page.  He honestly couldn't see why people would want them.

I know this might change as he gets into his college years, but hopefully he'll now be smarter than the average bear about how to properly use those newfangled communication venues.
 
2013-05-22 10:44:53 AM
How can a jump be "massive"?
 
2013-05-22 10:45:44 AM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: Petey4335: As some 19y/o who met his future wife in the mid 90's when she was 15 on a local BBS, yeah, I'm all up on my teenage daughter's phone/computer/nook and what she is doing and trying help her keep things private as much as possible, thankyouverymuch. I can't keep it all private, but at least I can teach her how to avoid stupid mistakes that can haunt her the rest of her life.

Like marrying a fifteen year old she met on the internet?


19 yr old. Pay attention!
 
2013-05-22 10:58:20 AM
Jim_Callahan: "That's all you need to secure your private information at a level where casual snoops won't get into it"

That... and:
-- practice good password use (not popular, not guessable, not universal, not carved in stone, not written on a sticky stuck to your damn laptop)
-- lock your computer when you walk away from it
-- put a passcode on your mobile devices
-- properly wipe all your computing devices before re-selling/handing-down/sending them in for service
-- don't hand your devices to people you don't/can't trust
-- don't use unsecured wired or wireless networks
-- don't install unknown/untrusted software
-- keep your browser/OS up to date
-- pay attention to the permissions all those mobile apps are asking for
-- etc, etc

As a teenager or young adult: good farking luck appreciating and prioritizing all of that.

/ It may not -sound- casual for someone to set up a wifi network or snoop a corporate/collegiate network just to snag user information, but to the educated snoop, it really is.
// you spend a day setting up a plug computer image, buy a few, slap em into power outlets wherever young/dumb people congregate and free data just rolls in
/// to say nothing of how casual it is for a creeper at the geek squad, or verizon store, or strolling through your dorm, to hoover up anything unsecured and share it with his creep friends.
 
2013-05-22 11:04:15 AM
Kids are as short sighted and gullible as they ever have been. It's no different today than in tthroughout history. The difference is the scope of dissemination, ease of discovery,  and permanence of the decisions they make or the things to which they fall victim.

Back in the day kids could get away with a lot of dumb ideas. But the limited scope, lack of any permanence of the event and even the connections each person had to the local social structure would limit the impact of whatever stupid thing it was. Even resulting rumors would have limited life because  it depended strongly on the reputation of the story teller.

Now that same event can be delivered as "fact" ( by picture, screenshot, etc )  that has a dramatic scope spreading through to schools, towns, states... and more. It has a persistence that can last the child's entire lifetime. This can be devastating.  And there's no room for doubt or reprieve for the child.

An adult can shrug this off, or have the strength of character and will to endure it, but children may not have this skill developed fully. The same naivety that caused the event to happen in the first place, usually does not provide the child with the skills to navigate such a social blunder.

/WARNING CSB FOLLOWS: When I was a teen in the 80's  I was featured in a small article in a magazine. It was for one of those human interest "heart warming, awww look at the puppy"  stories... not controversial at all.  I received "fan mail" letters in response to the story. I thought it was weird that people who took the time to figure out from the article where I lived and found my street address somehow. ( no great mystery, I suppose...we were in the phone book,  but the effort that some random person would go to to do this was surprising )

What truly surprised me, was how much hate-mail I got....Dozens of letters, many of which I didn't read until I was an adult because my parents intercepted them. People being arseholes for no reason at all, except to maybe make themselves feel schadenfreude or something. I was a fairly confident, "well adjusted" teen. I knew how to take my lumps, but even then it hurt to have completely random strangers hate you. Now I look at the internet and shudder to think what would happen to someone who was part of an actual controversy or embarrassing issue.
 
2013-05-22 11:08:24 AM
*takes pic of MacBook Pro with geolocation on*
"Uh, my stupid parents didn't buy me the one with the retina display and they won't drive me to the Apple store to exchange it until after we get back from our stupid family vacation. My dad just bought a new Porsche and my 12-year-old brother got a 60-inch TV for his bedroom last month on his birthday. I think we can afford for me to be seen with a nicer laptop."
*takes picture of house from driveway with geolocation on*
"Goodbye house. See you after two weeks in Europe!"
*returns home*
"Oh my god we've been robbed!"

I was in college when Facebook launched and was limited to a handful of universities. If I recall correctly you were limited to adding friends within your school and not outside of it. It was a great tool. People used it to organize events, schedule study groups for classes, etc. There were no kids, no companies, no relatives. It's become something so completely different now.
 
2013-05-22 11:20:29 AM
Old people:
-don't want to share that much
-only want to share it with family and close friends

Young people:
-want to share anything and everything
-want to share it with everyone except close family
 
2013-05-22 11:26:11 AM
I had to fix all my prior posts to exclude my parents from being able to view when they joined Facebook, and I'm farking 30.  I don't want to deal with the inevitable political and religious diatribe that would follow if they read that stuff.
 
2013-05-22 11:36:04 AM

I, too, have a remove the door policy if it gets slammed. I also have a "slam the front door and I change the lock" policy.
I'm one of those old fashioned "I do what I say and say what I do"  kind of parents - i.e. there is no idle threats in my house. Nice thing is, I only have to say something once. :)

Amazing what consistent parenting can accomplish.


Jim_Callahan:
Set profile to "viewable by friends only".

Do not add as a friend:
-- your parents
-- siblings who regularly talk about your private life with your parents
-- your boss
-- your co-workers on whom you do not have your own blackmail material

There, done.  That's all you need to secure your private information at a level where casual snoops won't get into it. As a teenager or young adult, that's pretty much all you need.

marleymaniac: In my house, you slam the door, the door is removed. Only has to happen once for them to learn!

That must have been hell on your heating bill the first time one of them stormed out to spend the night with a friend or something.

 
2013-05-22 11:53:54 AM
Please Facebook, just go the way of MySpace.

/happy to see the shift to message centric apps
 
2013-05-22 11:56:21 AM

louiedog: It was a great tool. People used it to organize events, schedule study groups for classes, etc. There were no kids, no companies, no relatives. It's become something so completely different now.


Replace "Facebook: with "Internet" circa mid '90s and the exact statement applies.
 
2013-05-22 12:03:29 PM

huntercr: Kids are as short sighted and gullible as they ever have been. It's no different today than in tthroughout history. The difference is the scope of dissemination, ease of discovery,  and permanence of the decisions they make or the things to which they fall victim.



Pretty much what this guy says.  Kids have always been...kids.  This just happens to be the first generation that can have all of their stupid, embarrassing moments broadcast to the world.  I cringe to think about all of the stupid/embarrassing/naive things me and my friends did when I was younger getting out there on vimeo, youtube, facebook, tumblr, et cetera and so on.   Parents/teachers/society in general still needs to adapt to this boom in social networking and teach children(and lots of adults, now that I think of it) how to use it properly(tall order, I know.)
 
2013-05-22 12:12:11 PM
I constantly drill into my kids' heads to keep their personal stuff (feelings, info) off of facebook. I look at each of their pages regularly. Even though I see (relatively tame) stuff sometimes that I don't particularly care for, I'm careful not to confront them directly because I know how easy it would be for them to simply alt. Instead I try and work what I want to say into normal conversation.
 
2013-05-22 12:28:21 PM

LoneCraneFullMoon: huntercr: Kids are as short sighted and gullible as they ever have been. It's no different today than in tthroughout history. The difference is the scope of dissemination, ease of discovery,  and permanence of the decisions they make or the things to which they fall victim.


Pretty much what this guy says.  Kids have always been...kids.  This just happens to be the first generation that can have all of their stupid, embarrassing moments broadcast to the world.  I cringe to think about all of the stupid/embarrassing/naive things me and my friends did when I was younger getting out there on vimeo, youtube, facebook, tumblr, et cetera and so on.   Parents/teachers/society in general still needs to adapt to this boom in social networking and teach children(and lots of adults, now that I think of it) how to use it properly(tall order, I know.)


Yeah, I'm pretty glad I grew up in an era that didn't have too many cameras, and instant broadcast media around, too.  Only cameras we kids had were old Kodak 110s, and our pictures (thankfully) always came out bad.  Broadcast media for us were Batman Walkie Talkies.  Later upgraded to CB Radios.  Truckers don't take too kindly to kids making fart noises on the airwaves.

/good times...
 
2013-05-22 01:10:23 PM

bedtundy: LoneCraneFullMoon: huntercr: Kids are as short sighted and gullible as they ever have been. It's no different today than in tthroughout history. The difference is the scope of dissemination, ease of discovery,  and permanence of the decisions they make or the things to which they fall victim.


Pretty much what this guy says.  Kids have always been...kids.  This just happens to be the first generation that can have all of their stupid, embarrassing moments broadcast to the world.  I cringe to think about all of the stupid/embarrassing/naive things me and my friends did when I was younger getting out there on vimeo, youtube, facebook, tumblr, et cetera and so on.   Parents/teachers/society in general still needs to adapt to this boom in social networking and teach children(and lots of adults, now that I think of it) how to use it properly(tall order, I know.)

Yeah, I'm pretty glad I grew up in an era that didn't have too many cameras, and instant broadcast media around, too.  Only cameras we kids had were old Kodak 110s, and our pictures (thankfully) always came out bad.  Broadcast media for us were Batman Walkie Talkies.  Later upgraded to CB Radios.  Truckers don't take too kindly to kids making fart noises on the airwaves.

/good times...


CS, breaker 1-9 time:

When I was around 12 years old my dad and his friends would take me and my younger friends to camp out the night before the first day of trout fishing season so we would get the best spot on the dam.  So the camp out ended up in 2 separate factions - my dad and his friends drinking beers at a campground down the road, and me any my friends figuring out some way to entertain ourselves sans alcohol.  One particular year, we found the CB radio is my dad's mini-van (kind of creepy vehicle & accessory combo come to think of it...), and started trying to prank truckers.  At first we started with your standard douchebaggish pre-teen stuff, dumb jokes and insults which were quickly dismissed.  Eventually we decided that we would do girl voices and try to get some truckers to rendezvous with us at a truck stop (nowhere even close to where we were).  I had picked the name "Selma" as my female alter ego, and we continued flirting with random truckers, finding it more fun than the standard "is your refrigerator running?" types of material.  But eventually we got bored and decided to go to sleep, which was just a few sleeping bags in the back of the van.  Shortly after I had dozed off, I heard several footsteps coming up to and around the, van, along with some muffled voices.  Assuming it was just my dad and his bros, I thought nothing of it.  But then, a knock comes on the rear window and a flashlight shines in, and I hear "Selmaaaaaa, are you in thereeee?"  Might have been the single most terrifying moment in my life, a group of truckers had triangulated our signal apparently and found us.  Fortunately I think when they found that it was just a bunch of 12 year old boys getting their kicks they left us alone without any hassle.  Never farked with anyone via CB radio again...
 
2013-05-22 01:22:46 PM
I am the Dad, i pay for the phone, internet connection the firewall and the computer as well as the roof and food. kids do not have any rights in my house. Kid will do as they are told
 
2013-05-22 01:23:55 PM

chocolate covered poop: bedtundy: LoneCraneFullMoon: huntercr: Kids are as short sighted and gullible as they ever have been. It's no different today than in tthroughout history. The difference is the scope of dissemination, ease of discovery,  and permanence of the decisions they make or the things to which they fall victim.


Pretty much what this guy says.  Kids have always been...kids.  This just happens to be the first generation that can have all of their stupid, embarrassing moments broadcast to the world.  I cringe to think about all of the stupid/embarrassing/naive things me and my friends did when I was younger getting out there on vimeo, youtube, facebook, tumblr, et cetera and so on.   Parents/teachers/society in general still needs to adapt to this boom in social networking and teach children(and lots of adults, now that I think of it) how to use it properly(tall order, I know.)

Yeah, I'm pretty glad I grew up in an era that didn't have too many cameras, and instant broadcast media around, too.  Only cameras we kids had were old Kodak 110s, and our pictures (thankfully) always came out bad.  Broadcast media for us were Batman Walkie Talkies.  Later upgraded to CB Radios.  Truckers don't take too kindly to kids making fart noises on the airwaves.

/good times...

CS, breaker 1-9 time:


(your story got snipped in comment quote thingy)

Oh wow, that would have scared us straight had any of the truckers we pranked decided to triangulate our signal, and come after us.  We just got cussed at, and then we'd switch channels and continue until we got bored.  Stopped prank calling when a friend of mine got caught by a neighbor that had just gotten caller ID installed.  That was scary too.
 
2013-05-22 01:27:04 PM

nitefallz: teenagers are farking stupid


greed is eternal, so are stupid teenagers.
 
2013-05-22 03:27:07 PM
Slam the door once and the door goes into storage in the garage.
Don't believe me? Try it!
 
2013-05-23 02:52:07 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Kids today are disrespectful brats. Worse than ever.



I see no hope for the future of our nation if we are dependent on the frivolous youth of today, for certainly all youth are reckless beyond words. When I was young, we were taught to be discreet and respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly disrespectful and impatient of restraint. As for the girls, they are forward, immodest and unladylike in speech, behaviour and dress.
 
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