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(TampaBay.com (St. Petersburg Tim)   Clearwater police show Washington D.C. how to handle a scandal   (tampabay.com) divider line 44
    More: Florida, Clearwater, Washington DC, Tampa Police Department, Clearwater Police Department, Clearwater police, scandals  
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9496 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 May 2013 at 9:34 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-21 09:25:23 AM
"Its use has not always been tightly regulated. "

No shiat.  What?  Is it a big revelation that an officer was looking up personal information out of curiosity or for their own personal reasons?
 
2013-05-21 09:37:36 AM
The IRS and Treasury disciplines for the same thing. And it doesn't take 100 tries. And it could just be looking up famous people for kicks.
 
2013-05-21 09:37:45 AM
I'd bet a month's salary that this goes on all the time.  Look back at Hoover and McCarthy.  They frequently went on fishing expeditions snooping on Hollywood celebrities in the creepiest way imaginable.  That was our lesson:  A spy state quickly degenerates into petty personal or purely prurient snooping.  It allows people in positions of authority to use that authority to exert control over people where they have no right to do so.

I'm not surprised that the lesson wasn't learned.
 
2013-05-21 09:39:39 AM
and the wives of other police officers.

I suspect this is the line that got him in trouble.
 
2013-05-21 09:40:36 AM
i.qkme.me
 
2013-05-21 09:42:02 AM

Kibbler: I'd bet a month's salary that this goes on all the time.  Look back at Hoover and McCarthy.  They frequently went on fishing expeditions snooping on Hollywood celebrities in the creepiest way imaginable.  That was our lesson:  A spy state quickly degenerates into petty personal or purely prurient snooping.  It allows people in positions of authority to use that authority to exert control over people where they have no right to do so.

I'm not surprised that the lesson wasn't learned.


And it goes on at all levels: city, state and Federal.  Funny thing when you hand over your privacy to a bureaucracy, it tends to get abused by people over the smallest matters.
 
2013-05-21 09:42:44 AM

BitwiseShift: The IRS and Treasury disciplines for the same thing.


Social Security Administration too.  I worked with the guy whose job it was to decide whether you were a "celebrity" at the SSA or not.  If he decided you were, your SSA data was specially restricted.
 
2013-05-21 09:45:41 AM
He should be fired. Anyone in any other job who did something like this would be.
 
2013-05-21 09:48:24 AM
So, do his targets have recourse in civil court?
Farking prosecutor is a fail, also needs firing.
 
2013-05-21 09:49:53 AM

syberpud: Kibbler: I'd bet a month's salary that this goes on all the time.  Look back at Hoover and McCarthy.  They frequently went on fishing expeditions snooping on Hollywood celebrities in the creepiest way imaginable.  That was our lesson:  A spy state quickly degenerates into petty personal or purely prurient snooping.  It allows people in positions of authority to use that authority to exert control over people where they have no right to do so.

I'm not surprised that the lesson wasn't learned.

And it goes on at all levels: city, state and Federal.  Funny thing when you hand over your privacy to a bureaucracy, it tends to get abused by people over the smallest matters.


Once upon a time, we were aware of and protected from this chit.
Put that genie back.
 
2013-05-21 09:51:29 AM
Lets be honest... the only time a cop is ever charged with misconduct stuff like this, is when he pissed off somebody else in the department. This isnt an upstanding police force cleaning house, it means the cop rubbed a superior the wrong way and is now eating shiat for it.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-21 09:53:12 AM
Internal investigators say a Clearwater police commander used a law enforcement database more than 100 times during a two-year period for "questionable" purposes, inappropriately looking up personal information about individuals including his ex-wife's boyfriend, a television news reporter and the wives of other police officers.

Private government records are open for police inspection as long as the target is a "nobody." Once you start pulling photos of cute police girls, Obama's passport records, and so forth the system wakes up and you get in trouble.
 
2013-05-21 09:54:01 AM

Walker: He should be fired. Anyone in any other job who did something like this would be.


You think so?  Police departments have protocols for accessing law enforcement databases without a legitimate reason.  According to mine it's grounds for "disciplinary action up to termination" and "you may have access to TCIC/NCIC revoked".  Since I'm a dispatcher that last big is pretty much a de facto termination.  I can't do my job without TCIC/NCIC.

This isn't a scandal or even a news story worth noticing.  It's an internal disciplinary action regarding something that happens all the time.  Then again, this is Fark.
 
2013-05-21 09:58:38 AM
I wants to read the personal infos of strangers but no wants to get in troubles. FACEBOOK, HOW DOES U WORK???
 
2013-05-21 10:04:47 AM
Crean's research covered a strange assortment of professional contacts, private acquaintances and celebrities, ranging from WTVT-Ch. 13 morning news anchor Laura Moody to a server at a Clearwater bar whom he looked up 14 times. Investigators found that Crean disproportionately sought information about women between the ages of 24 and 33.

On Friday, the Clearwater Police Department command staff recommended that he be demoted to sergeant and suspended for five days.


Nearly anyone in any position at any company or government agency that did not involve law enforcement would have been fired for this. Such utter contempt for the civilians they claim to protect.
 
2013-05-21 10:06:37 AM
"In a statement to internal investigators, Crean said he "never really received any formal training" on the statewide database.

"It was never my intent to invade anyone's privacy with malice or ill will towards any other persons that I queried," he said."

I'm sorry officer. I didn't know I couldn't do that.
 
2013-05-21 10:08:03 AM
I don't even Google my ex-girlfriends without putting my browser in Incognito Mode.

How dumb you gotta be to misuse a system with such a comprehensive audit trail?
 
2013-05-21 10:12:12 AM

ZAZ: Internal investigators say a Clearwater police commander used a law enforcement database more than 100 times during a two-year period for "questionable" purposes, inappropriately looking up personal information about individuals including his ex-wife's boyfriend, a television news reporter and the wives of other police officers.

Private government records are open for police inspection as long as the target is a "nobody." Once you start pulling photos of cute police girls, Obama's passport records, and so forth the system wakes up and you get in trouble.


It's not so relaxed in every department. My cousin idiotically looked up his ex-wife's boyfriend, then told her he wasn't comfortable having him around their son because of his record; she reported it and he got fired. Can't get work in another department in the area either. That really backfired on her so far as alimony goes.

\No one ever said cops are smart, so I think an example every now and then is fair. I just wish my cousin had proven himself a tiny but smarter.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-21 10:13:17 AM
According to mine it's grounds for "disciplinary action up to termination"

Standard HR CYA language which does not necessarily track actual practice. When I was acquired by a large corporation some years back they made us agree to all the corporate policies. Each one included a warning that any violation could result in disciplinary action up to and including immediate termination. As private employees we could be terminated immediately, not suspended with pay then fired after hearing then rehired with back pay after the arbitrator decided the boss was mean.
 
2013-05-21 10:19:07 AM

jayphat: "In a statement to internal investigators, Crean said he "never really received any formal training" on the statewide database.


Hey, what's that thing we always hear from the cops?

Something about ignorance of the law being no excuse?
 
2013-05-21 10:27:19 AM
Anybody else misread his ex-wife's name as Christie Cream??  Thought it was a great name for a porn star ...or a doughnut.
 
2013-05-21 10:32:46 AM
I blame Scientology
 
2013-05-21 10:42:56 AM
Aarontology: jayphat: "In a statement to internal investigators, Crean said he "never really received any formal training" on the statewide database.

Maybe that's why he wasn't fired. If he really didn't receive any 'formal training' on the proper use of the system, then how can he be disciplined if he violated the policy? I have mandatory training every year on my company's time reporting system and several other things. Most of it is common sense, but if they don't TELL me, then how can I be responsible for complying?

And I'll agree that this sort of thing likely goes on all the time. His real crime was looking up the wrong people.

I don't get all the whining and cries of oppression & abuse. Yeah, he looked up a bunch of personal info, but unless he can be shown to have acted on any of it, he was basically channel surfing IMHO.
 
2013-05-21 10:45:12 AM
In other news, Google probably has more information on you.
 
2013-05-21 10:48:40 AM

jasenj1: Maybe that's why he wasn't fired. If he really didn't receive any 'formal training' on the proper use of the system, then how can he be disciplined if he violated the policy? I have mandatory training every year on my company's time reporting system and several other things. Most of it is common sense, but if they don't TELL me, then how can I be responsible for complying?


I think the problem when it comes to that, is that there are police officers who aren't properly trained in their duties.

But my point was that if we tried to use the "we didn't know it was a crime" defense for something, it wouldn't work. And it especially shouldn't work when it comes to a person who is sworn with upholding the law.
 
2013-05-21 10:51:25 AM

Aarontology: jayphat: "In a statement to internal investigators, Crean said he "never really received any formal training" on the statewide database.

Hey, what's that thing we always hear from the cops?

Something about ignorance of the law being no excuse?


Christ. I work for a pharmacy retailer and I'm told all the time that ignorance of the law is no excuse. Well I'm sorry, the criminal and civil code is 16000 pages long. Let me know when you have every single law and regulation memorized, mmmkay?
 
2013-05-21 10:55:24 AM
Florida is remarkably loose about access to that system.  The one thing that will raise a flag is if you run a record that is actually a fake set up for an undercover - those are actually in a separate database that the regular one links through to (you look up a particular DL/SSN/whatever, the regular HSMV database has a pointer that sends the query to the undercovers database).

A query on that means an immediate call to the undercover officer's supervisors, and you will get a personal visit from FDLE. Happened every now and then during software testing.
 
2013-05-21 11:36:49 AM

Walker: He should be fired. Anyone in any other job who did something like this would be.


In Alabama he'd be begging to just get fired.  He'd be charged with multiple felonies and his best possible outcome would be to negotiate a plea deal that turned him into a convicted felon but didn't involve actual jail time.  To satisfy the farkers that don't believe it happens, here are a few examples from the last couple of years.

http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/6.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/15.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/21.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/24.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/25.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/28.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/31.pdf

I also know of two cases that are in trial right now.  It is danged near impossible to catch the guy who runs the hot waitress and never does anything else, but these serial offenders will eventually get caught and they take it very seriously around here.
 
2013-05-21 11:59:20 AM

JustGetItRight: Walker: He should be fired. Anyone in any other job who did something like this would be.

In Alabama he'd be begging to just get fired.  He'd be charged with multiple felonies and his best possible outcome would be to negotiate a plea deal that turned him into a convicted felon but didn't involve actual jail time.  To satisfy the farkers that don't believe it happens, here are a few examples from the last couple of years.

http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/6.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/15.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/21.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/24.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/25.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/28.pdf
http://acjic.alabama.gov/news/31.pdf

I also know of two cases that are in trial right now.  It is danged near impossible to catch the guy who runs the hot waitress and never does anything else, but these serial offenders will eventually get caught and they take it very seriously around here.


That there is a DA who wants you to know he's doing his farking job.
 
2013-05-21 12:08:28 PM
Seems there could be a simple solution.  Make it so that a search can't be made without inputting the case number or a citation number into the computer first, and every single search is linked in this way and a record kept.
 
2013-05-21 01:02:06 PM
I assumed cops did this all the time. I was really surprised now that I'm in school with a bunch of cops and they told me there were pretty strict rules against it. Up until then, I was assuming they knew all my dirty secrets. It's anecdotal, but I know them well enough to trust them and believe what they say.
 
2013-05-21 01:05:46 PM

Walker: He should be fired. Anyone in any other job who did something like this would be.


Nice sentiment albeit somewhat naive.

You know that whole thing about not wanting to know what happens with the food in the kitchen?

Same thing goes for not wanting to know what happens to your data in I.T.
 
2013-05-21 01:07:53 PM

jayphat: That there is a DA who wants you to know he's doing his farking job.


It's actually several.  Some prosecuted at the local DA level, some at the state AG level, and some at the federal level.

The real key is the data is owned by a state level entity and potential misuse is investigated and dealt with by them.  The prosecutor doesn't get involved until they're ready to bring charges and since they aren't influenced by local politics and such, they don't give a shait how it makes the local PD look.

Lots of those will also try the 'I didn't know/I wasn't trained' defense but it never works because every singe query page in the system has a bigass warning across the top stating it is for law enforcement purposes only and violations will be prosecuted.
 
2013-05-21 01:12:51 PM

manimal2878: Seems there could be a simple solution.  Make it so that a search can't be made without inputting the case number or a citation number into the computer first, and every single search is linked in this way and a record kept.


You're pretty close to how it happens.  Most systems require a log (either paper or electronic) tying a query to a case - which is how they get caught.  Either the queries aren't logged or they're logged to a case that is clearly unrelated.

The offenders know there's a trail, they just don't think they'll get caught.
 
2013-05-21 01:55:50 PM
Clearwater isn't that the PD that's a wholly owned subsidiary of $cientology?
 
2013-05-21 02:18:51 PM

JustGetItRight: manimal2878: Seems there could be a simple solution.  Make it so that a search can't be made without inputting the case number or a citation number into the computer first, and every single search is linked in this way and a record kept.

You're pretty close to how it happens.  Most systems require a log (either paper or electronic) tying a query to a case - which is how they get caught.  Either the queries aren't logged or they're logged to a case that is clearly unrelated.

The offenders know there's a trail, they just don't think they'll get caught.


Just like most criminals!
That is why thinking a law will deter human behavior is so stupid.
 
2013-05-21 06:12:24 PM
"Crean disproportionately sought information about women between the ages of 24 and 33. "

TooOld.jpg
 
2013-05-22 03:20:14 AM
I wouldn't mind looking up Laura Moody's ole database myself. Or Jennifer Epstein. Or April Kellog. Or Denis White. Or  Lindsay Milbourne. The bastards lost Sheena Parveen.... excuse me, I'll be in my bunk
 
2013-05-22 08:04:34 AM
having this ability requires training
part of that training is a federal warning that use beyond the scope of duty is a serious offense
punishable by immediate firing and possible charges/fines etc.
There is a login with a password for each person,
 it is regulated and the management should be checking up on all people accessed
 
2013-05-22 11:28:57 AM
Use of the system out of the scope of his duties should carry the same felony charges as any other unauthorized user.
 
2013-05-22 02:08:39 PM

UberDave: "Its use has not always been tightly regulated. "

No shiat.  What?  Is it a big revelation that an officer was looking up personal information out of curiosity or for their own personal reasons?


Clearwater? I assume he is a Scientology operative and that he was following direct orders from David Miscavige.
 
2013-05-22 02:10:08 PM

Kibbler: I'd bet a month's salary that this goes on all the time.  Look back at Hoover and McCarthy.  They frequently went on fishing expeditions snooping on Hollywood celebrities in the creepiest way imaginable.  That was our lesson:  A spy state quickly degenerates into petty personal or purely prurient snooping.  It allows people in positions of authority to use that authority to exert control over people where they have no right to do so.

I'm not surprised that the lesson wasn't learned.


Bu..bu...bu...but I was told that big government is our friend and daddy!

When the lights are out, you forget he's your daddy.
 
2013-05-22 02:12:19 PM

ZAZ: Internal investigators say a Clearwater police commander used a law enforcement database more than 100 times during a two-year period for "questionable" purposes, inappropriately looking up personal information about individuals including his ex-wife's boyfriend, a television news reporter and the wives of other police officers.

Private government records are open for police inspection as long as the target is a "nobody." Once you start pulling photos of cute police girls, Obama's passport records, and so forth the system wakes up and you get in trouble.


I assume that doing the same with civilian girls is OK, though?
 
2013-05-22 04:07:52 PM

natas6.0: having this ability requires training
part of that training is a federal warning that use beyond the scope of duty is a serious offense
punishable by immediate firing and possible charges/fines etc.
There is a login with a password for each person,
 it is regulated and the management should be checking up on all people accessed


"login and password"
Shirley, you jest. Any 10yo Nintendo child can beat that chit.
From any public connection.
 
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