If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(News9 Oklahoma)   Oklahoma tornado thread #3. LGT live updates/streaming   (news9.com) divider line 565
    More: Followup, Oklahoma, Norton LiveUpdate  
•       •       •

2636 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 May 2013 at 12:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



565 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-21 07:34:56 AM

SlothB77: A family of four died hiding in a freezer? Dont take your tornado safety advice from indiana jones movies.


nice.  It was a walk-in freezer, and normally those things survive tornadoes.  this is not a normal tornado.
 
2013-05-21 07:35:37 AM

Medic Zero: evilsofa: Medic Zero: Who builds out of just concrete? It needs steel reinforcement inside it.

Oh, you want to build homes in Oklahoma with ICF walls instead of 2x6 frame?  Just increase the costs of your exterior walls by 2 or 3 times.  Say your original exterior wall cost was $6,000, now it's $20,000.

No problem.  So simple!  Right, guys?

I never said it was simple or cheap.


That's the same BS we heard after Andrew hit Homestead. Funny, all the homes were rebuilt, but to an entirely new standard. New rules were also put into place to make sure structures in a storm surge zone were built at least 6' - 9' off the ground.

I don't understand how you would want to live in a completely wood framed house where tornadoes are a possibility. At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks. But that's just me.

This is freaking horrifying to watch, hearts out to all those affected.
 
2013-05-21 07:36:28 AM

SlothB77: A family of four died hiding in a freezer?


That's one big freezer. Mine holds two hookers, three at the most if they're crack whores.
 
2013-05-21 07:37:09 AM
It's interesting to watch weathermen and reporters there this morning.  Their default mode is to always seem upbeat and energetic.  It's like they have to keep reminding themselves to tone it down a bit.
 
2013-05-21 07:39:51 AM

SDRR: I don't understand how you would want to live in a completely wood framed house where tornadoes are a possibility. At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks. But that's just me.

This is freaking horrifying to watch, hearts out to all those affected.


Oklahoma is one of the cheapest places in the country to live.  The result is that we don't really have a lot of money for sturdy construction.
 
2013-05-21 07:43:39 AM

reillan: SDRR: I don't understand how you would want to live in a completely wood framed house where tornadoes are a possibility. At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks. But that's just me.

This is freaking horrifying to watch, hearts out to all those affected.

Oklahoma is one of the cheapest places in the country to live.  The result is that we don't really have a lot of money for sturdy construction.


I think that tornado made Andrew look like a spring shower too, which isn't helping. Horrible.
 
2013-05-21 07:45:26 AM

RockChalkH1N1: SlothB77: A family of four died hiding in a freezer? Dont take your tornado safety advice from indiana jones movies.

LULz


If that was the 7-11 one the walk in is one of the safest places you can go barring getting underground. Woke up to hail hitting our roof this morning. The southeast part of the state its supposed to get hit today. Brother and his wife just got finished with his new house in Atoka and he is up on an oil rig around Alva leaving his wife and their grandkids and kitty cats by themselves so if it turns to shiat later today might be making a trip down there
 
2013-05-21 07:46:41 AM

SDRR: reillan: SDRR: I don't understand how you would want to live in a completely wood framed house where tornadoes are a possibility. At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks. But that's just me.

This is freaking horrifying to watch, hearts out to all those affected.

Oklahoma is one of the cheapest places in the country to live.  The result is that we don't really have a lot of money for sturdy construction.

I think that tornado made Andrew look like a spring shower too, which isn't helping. Horrible.


Many of the destroyed homes had brick in their construction too. Look at the school. It wasn't prefab wood. And it didn't fare much better.
 
2013-05-21 07:47:35 AM

SlothB77: A family of four died hiding in a freezer? Dont take your tornado safety advice from indiana jones movies.


No, better to tie yourself to a large pipe.
 
2013-05-21 07:48:07 AM

SDRR: At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks.


you lose the roof, and your neighbors lose their roofs, then all the pieces of those roofs then tear down those concrete/cinder block walls.

2x4s at tornado speeds go through concrete like they weren't even there.
 
2013-05-21 07:55:01 AM

reillan: SlothB77: A family of four died hiding in a freezer? Dont take your tornado safety advice from indiana jones movies.

nice.  It was a walk-in freezer, and normally those things survive tornadoes.  this is not a normal tornado.


I keep mentioning the one in 2011 that hit us. The manager of the little c-store (likeable guy) seen it coming and went outside rushing customers inside to the walkin. That guy gets all my business now even if his store was on the other side of town. Back in '10 the one that hit the Loves on I40 and Choctaw the assistant manager went outside to rush people in and he ended up getting hit by debris
 
2013-05-21 07:59:31 AM

Hobodeluxe: Shadow Blasko: Holy
farking
shiat

http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/oklahoma-gop-sen-tom-cobu r n-will-seek-to?ref=fpb

how about we offset it by cutting his pay,retirement and any benefits he might be receiving?
bastard was probably the leaker in the AP scandal too.


Simple; cut other Federal aid that Oklahoma gets. Reduce military spending at bases, Federal highway money, whatever, if Coburn and Inhofe want to offset any disaster spending. Let's see how fast they change their tune then.
 
2013-05-21 08:07:27 AM

SomeOkieGirl: I didn't see any mention of my name but I don't have TF anymore. I did check in on the original thread and was checking on basemetal and a few others. Everyone is okay around here. So sad for my friends and family that were no so lucky.


Your name came up in a GG conversation. I'll pass along the news of your okness if that's cool with you.

My heart is so heavy for those that lost family and friends. The stuff you can always get back...the people not so much. Y'all keep the responders in your thoughts as well...They have a long row to hoe in the next few days. I just heard that the Plaza Tower scene has been declared a "recovery" scene.

Shiat.
 
2013-05-21 08:07:28 AM

Evilhippie: Not trying to rub salt in anyone's wound here, but I was sitting with my girlfriend and watching a newsfeed. It seems pretty much all houses in the path of the tornado are built with wood. I live in Northern Europe and we are used to some weather as well (no big tornadoes though). All our homes and buildings are built either with clay bricks or concrete - to offer proper shelter in e.g. a hurricane, and to keep heat inside during cold winters.

I just wonder, why on Earth would you build this many obviously vulnerable wooden homes in an area infamous for its rough weather? Haven't you guys ever heard of The Three Little Pigs?


I think wood frame houses are MUCH more common here in the US than over in Europe; you see them even in northern Maine, for example; yes, much of our housing stock isn't terribly energy efficient in winter time, but good insulation can help a LOT.  Just put extra in my condo (wooden) a few years back.

Now, you throw an F4 tornado at a quaint brick northern European town...and I bet you're going to get a lot of quaint brick shrapnel.

Same thing would happen in Boston, of course, with the brick townhouses here.
(And if we ever get a big earthquake...well, we're about due for one.)

Now, as far as concrete goes...did you see the picture of that medical center? yes, it was still standing, but it was pretty banged up.  Real tornadoes are no-fooling around, finger-of-god type weather...
 
2013-05-21 08:07:52 AM

log_jammin: SDRR: At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks.

you lose the roof, and your neighbors lose their roofs, then all the pieces of those roofs then tear down those concrete/cinder block walls.

2x4s at tornado speeds go through concrete like they weren't even there.


Actually a reinforced concrete wall stops 2x4's pretty well; the board shatters on the outside without penetrating. Hollow concrete block or brick on a wood frame wall the 2x4 punches right through.

No, the only kind of structure that would have survived yesterday's tornado would have been a small, steel reinforced concrete building or room where the walls and roof were all cast as one unit, with steel tying everything together internally. Even then I'd want the concrete walls to be at least 8" thick and the door would be a concern; there was one image of a huge metal water tank that had been ripped from its support and thrown a half mile or more by the storm. The strength of this tornado was initially estimated at a strong EF4 but I expect it will be upgraded to EF5 once the assessment is finished.
 
2013-05-21 08:11:50 AM

PunGent: Evilhippie: Not trying to rub salt in anyone's wound here, but I was sitting with my girlfriend and watching a newsfeed. It seems pretty much all houses in the path of the tornado are built with wood. I live in Northern Europe and we are used to some weather as well (no big tornadoes though). All our homes and buildings are built either with clay bricks or concrete - to offer proper shelter in e.g. a hurricane, and to keep heat inside during cold winters.

I just wonder, why on Earth would you build this many obviously vulnerable wooden homes in an area infamous for its rough weather? Haven't you guys ever heard of The Three Little Pigs?

I think wood frame houses are MUCH more common here in the US than over in Europe; you see them even in northern Maine, for example; yes, much of our housing stock isn't terribly energy efficient in winter time, but good insulation can help a LOT.  Just put extra in my condo (wooden) a few years back.

Now, you throw an F4 tornado at a quaint brick northern European town...and I bet you're going to get a lot of quaint brick shrapnel.

Same thing would happen in Boston, of course, with the brick townhouses here.
(And if we ever get a big earthquake...well, we're about due for one.)

Now, as far as concrete goes...did you see the picture of that medical center? yes, it was still standing, but it was pretty banged up.  Real tornadoes are no-fooling around, finger-of-god type weather...


Indeed. Makes me wonder if those saying "why don't you build your house of bricks?" really understand how powerful these tornadoes are. Do they get them in Europe?
 
2013-05-21 08:16:30 AM
 
2013-05-21 08:17:27 AM
So, Moore is now Less?
 
2013-05-21 08:20:14 AM

muck4doo: Indeed. Makes me wonder if those saying "why don't you build your house of bricks?" really understand how powerful these tornadoes are. Do they get them in Europe?


Tornadoes in Europe

Looks like 3-5 a year, for the entire continent. During tornado season in the US, I'm fairly sure there's 3-5 on ground at any given moment, for the entire season.
 
2013-05-21 08:21:22 AM

SDRR: Medic Zero: evilsofa: Medic Zero: Who builds out of just concrete? It needs steel reinforcement inside it.

Oh, you want to build homes in Oklahoma with ICF walls instead of 2x6 frame?  Just increase the costs of your exterior walls by 2 or 3 times.  Say your original exterior wall cost was $6,000, now it's $20,000.

No problem.  So simple!  Right, guys?

I never said it was simple or cheap.

That's the same BS we heard after Andrew hit Homestead. Funny, all the homes were rebuilt, but to an entirely new standard. New rules were also put into place to make sure structures in a storm surge zone were built at least 6' - 9' off the ground.

I don't understand how you would want to live in a completely wood framed house where tornadoes are a possibility. At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks. But that's just me.


Did you happen to see the pictures of the bowling ally or the school? I seem to remember a Home Depot in Joplin suffering a similar fate.

Concrete does not necessarily mean safe.
 
2013-05-21 08:22:00 AM
As a tornado, I am getting a kick out of these responses.
 
2013-05-21 08:22:44 AM

muck4doo: PunGent: Evilhippie: Not trying to rub salt in anyone's wound here, but I was sitting with my girlfriend and watching a newsfeed. It seems pretty much all houses in the path of the tornado are built with wood. I live in Northern Europe and we are used to some weather as well (no big tornadoes though). All our homes and buildings are built either with clay bricks or concrete - to offer proper shelter in e.g. a hurricane, and to keep heat inside during cold winters.

I just wonder, why on Earth would you build this many obviously vulnerable wooden homes in an area infamous for its rough weather? Haven't you guys ever heard of The Three Little Pigs?

I think wood frame houses are MUCH more common here in the US than over in Europe; you see them even in northern Maine, for example; yes, much of our housing stock isn't terribly energy efficient in winter time, but good insulation can help a LOT.  Just put extra in my condo (wooden) a few years back.

Now, you throw an F4 tornado at a quaint brick northern European town...and I bet you're going to get a lot of quaint brick shrapnel.

Same thing would happen in Boston, of course, with the brick townhouses here.
(And if we ever get a big earthquake...well, we're about due for one.)

Now, as far as concrete goes...did you see the picture of that medical center? yes, it was still standing, but it was pretty banged up.  Real tornadoes are no-fooling around, finger-of-god type weather...

Indeed. Makes me wonder if those saying "why don't you build your house of bricks?" really understand how powerful these tornadoes are. Do they get them in Europe?


It's not that, it's the degree of destruction, this isn't a binary equation. There are plenty of pictures of CBS walls that failed, but in spots. The wood framed houses look like someone dumped a box of toothpicks on the lot where the house once stood.
 
2013-05-21 08:23:59 AM
www.wwe.com
Unavailable for comment.
 
2013-05-21 08:24:31 AM

jimmyjackfunk: reillan: SlothB77: A family of four died hiding in a freezer? Dont take your tornado safety advice from indiana jones movies.

nice.  It was a walk-in freezer, and normally those things survive tornadoes.  this is not a normal tornado.

I keep mentioning the one in 2011 that hit us. The manager of the little c-store (likeable guy) seen it coming and went outside rushing customers inside to the walkin. That guy gets all my business now even if his store was on the other side of town.


Oh, sure, I fill MY walk-in with people, and do they call ME a hero?

No, no they do not.  It's all "Monster!  Cannibal!  Eek!  Put down that saw!"

No appreciation whatsoever.
 
2013-05-21 08:24:34 AM

jimmyjackfunk: reillan: SlothB77: A family of four died hiding in a freezer? Dont take your tornado safety advice from indiana jones movies.

nice.  It was a walk-in freezer, and normally those things survive tornadoes.  this is not a normal tornado.

I keep mentioning the one in 2011 that hit us. The manager of the little c-store (likeable guy) seen it coming and went outside rushing customers inside to the walkin. That guy gets all my business now even if his store was on the other side of town. Back in '10 the one that hit the Loves on I40 and Choctaw the assistant manager went outside to rush people in and he ended up getting hit by debris


Yeah, a friend of my dad's was at the one in Catoosa back in 93, and rushed to help people affected after the building collapsed.  It wasn't until he finally sat down hours later that the bleeding in his brain took him (no one had even known he had been hit by any debris).
 
2013-05-21 08:26:32 AM
So, over 100 people pulled from rubble last night?   That's a bright spot.

/raining like a mother here right now
 
2013-05-21 08:26:33 AM

Fiction Fan: [www.wwe.com image 175x200]
Unavailable for comment.


And his opponent:

www.onlineworldofwrestling.com
 
2013-05-21 08:26:41 AM
Not trying to rub salt in anyone's wound here, but I was sitting with my girlfriend and watching a newsfeed. It seems pretty much all houses in the path of the tornado are built with wood. I live in Northern Europe and we are used to some weather as well (no big tornadoes though). All our homes and buildings are built either with clay bricks or concrete - to offer proper shelter in e.g. a hurricane, and to keep heat inside during cold winters.

I just wonder, why on Earth would you build this many obviously vulnerable wooden homes in an area infamous for its rough weather? Haven't you guys ever heard of The Three Little Pigs?


----
www.jazzwax.com
You mean these guys?
 
2013-05-21 08:26:53 AM

patchvonbraun: You know, I've never been involved in a tornado, but I have repeating nighmares about them.



Oh man, I hear you. I've never been anywhere close to being involved in one, but to me, the thought of something literally coming out of the sky and destroying entire cities is an absolutely terrifying thought.
 
2013-05-21 08:28:33 AM

CCTV footage from a gas station

that is no longer there
 
2013-05-21 08:30:04 AM

italie: SDRR: Medic Zero: evilsofa: Medic Zero: Who builds out of just concrete? It needs steel reinforcement inside it.

Oh, you want to build homes in Oklahoma with ICF walls instead of 2x6 frame?  Just increase the costs of your exterior walls by 2 or 3 times.  Say your original exterior wall cost was $6,000, now it's $20,000.

No problem.  So simple!  Right, guys?

I never said it was simple or cheap.

That's the same BS we heard after Andrew hit Homestead. Funny, all the homes were rebuilt, but to an entirely new standard. New rules were also put into place to make sure structures in a storm surge zone were built at least 6' - 9' off the ground.

I don't understand how you would want to live in a completely wood framed house where tornadoes are a possibility. At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks. But that's just me.

Did you happen to see the pictures of the bowling ally or the school? I seem to remember a Home Depot in Joplin suffering a similar fate.

Concrete does not necessarily mean safe.


One thing I learned from Joplin is that those big-box buildings made of vertical concrete slabs with a steel-frame roof can turn into utter deathtraps in a violent tornado. (Think Home Depot/Lowe's, Costco/Sam's Club, etc etc.) Those basically rely on the roof to keep the integrity of the structure intact. Which is all well and good, until an F4/F5 rips off the roof, and suddenly there's nothing helping to hold up those vertical slabs.

There were, as I recall, 6 or 8 people who died in the Joplin Home Depot because they had run in from the parking lot for shelter, only to be crushed when the roof disappeared and those concrete wall slabs tipped over on them.
 
2013-05-21 08:30:51 AM

LawrencePerson: More tornado footage.


was the middle video photo-shopped? I'm not sure I understand this...

i.imgur.com
 
2013-05-21 08:33:10 AM
img819.imageshack.us
 
2013-05-21 08:35:01 AM
"was the middle video photo-shopped"

technically you can Photoshop (no hyphen) a video, but it's tough to do.
Comes out grainy, usually has to be in GIF format, even when you manage it out of GIF it's still in low quality and you can create something faster, more believable and fun to watch in Motion, After Effects or Final Cut. Hell, even Sony Vegas or iMovie can do it better with a video than Photoshop.

So to answer your question, I don't know.
But probably not Photoshop. Probably After Effects.
 
2013-05-21 08:36:01 AM
 You know, I've never been involved in a tornado, but I have repeating nighmares about them.====


I have this recurring nightmare where i am a tornado in my underwear in class.
Once I was even a naked tornado.
 
2013-05-21 08:37:00 AM

muck4doo: Do they get them in Europe?


No, there are really only very few places on Earth that have the conditions to create something like this. They have no equivalent in Europe.
 
2013-05-21 08:37:37 AM

log_jammin: SDRR: At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks.

you lose the roof, and your neighbors lose their roofs, then all the pieces of those roofs then tear down those concrete/cinder block walls.

2x4s at tornado speeds go through concrete like they weren't even there.


Stop it with this stupidity. 2X4s aimed to perfectly to hit a non-reinforced cinder block wall, head on at 200mph, will go through it. Reinforced concrete stops them though. To pretend they're the same as a 2X6 wall is stupid.
 
2013-05-21 08:37:44 AM

Fiction Fan: "was the middle video photo-shopped"

technically you can Photoshop (no hyphen) a video, but it's tough to do.
Comes out grainy, usually has to be in GIF format, even when you manage it out of GIF it's still in low quality and you can create something faster, more believable and fun to watch in Motion, After Effects or Final Cut. Hell, even Sony Vegas or iMovie can do it better with a video than Photoshop.

So to answer your question, I don't know.
But probably not Photoshop. Probably After Effects.


I think he meant the image used at the front of the video.  If you click on it to play it, the video is totally different than the starting image.
 
2013-05-21 08:39:25 AM

Confabulat: muck4doo: Do they get them in Europe?

No, there are really only very few places on Earth that have the conditions to create something like this. They have no equivalent in Europe.


I always wonder why God hates the Bible Belt.
 
2013-05-21 08:41:00 AM
img824.imageshack.us

NEVER call Disaster Girl a "Boogerhead." EVER.
 
2013-05-21 08:43:25 AM

WippitGuud: CCTV footage from a gas station

that is no longer there

Not too bad, but meh, they didn't even lose power. On the other hand, I expect we'll start to see CCTV videos like this one from Joplin filtering out over the next few days.
 
2013-05-21 08:46:26 AM
I always wonder why God hates the Bible Belt.

---
I always wondered why the Three Bears never ate Goldilocks until I realized it was nothing but a story.
 
2013-05-21 08:47:13 AM
i1182.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-21 08:47:18 AM
I live in mid Michigan and we don't really have tornadoes here. Grew up in Iowa, saw a couple F3s and F4s myself.  Glad I don't have to deal with them as much anymore...but I did just realize there's not really a 'safe' place in my house right now. Unlikely I'd need one, but still...

/should research something someday
 
2013-05-21 08:49:22 AM

impaler: log_jammin: SDRR: At least if the walls are concrete/block, you lose the roof but the entire structure doesn't turn into toothpicks.

you lose the roof, and your neighbors lose their roofs, then all the pieces of those roofs then tear down those concrete/cinder block walls.

2x4s at tornado speeds go through concrete like they weren't even there.

Stop it with this stupidity. 2X4s aimed to perfectly to hit a non-reinforced cinder block wall, head on at 200mph, will go through it. Reinforced concrete stops them though. To pretend they're the same as a 2X6 wall is stupid.


Wtf?
 
2013-05-21 08:49:32 AM

Confabulat: muck4doo: Do they get them in Europe?

No, there are really only very few places on Earth that have the conditions to create something like this. They have no equivalent in Europe.


Yeah, doing more reading on this, and it looks like there are places around the world that get F0-F3 tornadoes on occasion, but the killer F4 and F5's are extremely rare outside of tornado alley in the U.S.

I live in North Austin, we are the tail end of Tornado Alley, but did get 2 really big ones in recent history in Cedar Park and Jarrell that aren't far from here. A huge tornado isn't something I really care to personally witness in my lifetime, even from miles away. Even though a couple of years ago there was a tornado warning a couple of years ago going right over my little neighborhood, and I went outside to see if there really was anything touching down. Thought I would have plenty of time to go inside to the bathtub.

/That was dumb.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-05-21 08:49:50 AM

Mr_H: I live in mid Michigan and we don't really have tornadoes here. Grew up in Iowa, saw a couple F3s and F4s myself.  Glad I don't have to deal with them as much anymore...but I did just realize there's not really a 'safe' place in my house right now. Unlikely I'd need one, but still...

/should research something someday


I'm not sure there was safe place for this one.  God was playing dice... life and death was just chance.
 
2013-05-21 08:53:47 AM

nukeim: Yup.  I mean...We had go-bags for the kids by the back door, I stocked the storm shelter with water, chairs, LED lanterns, etc...We also had a plan for how to do things if it hit the fan. It did, plan was enacted...And VOILA! No tornado at my house. Just baseball sized hail.But my wife is paranoid, and is a list-maker and a level VII planner...Most people? Not so much.I'm just agog that Moore got hit AGAIN. I grew up there, and both of the houses I grew up in are now gone. I feel so bad for the kids...That had to be absolutely terrifying. :(


The thing I was wondering is that there was a spot where the two tracks they were showing crossed each other, but I couldn't tell from the map whether it was a bunch of fields outside the suburbs still, or whether some people might have got hit in both 99 and now 13.
 
2013-05-21 08:59:54 AM

xria: nukeim: Yup.  I mean...We had go-bags for the kids by the back door, I stocked the storm shelter with water, chairs, LED lanterns, etc...We also had a plan for how to do things if it hit the fan. It did, plan was enacted...And VOILA! No tornado at my house. Just baseball sized hail.But my wife is paranoid, and is a list-maker and a level VII planner...Most people? Not so much.I'm just agog that Moore got hit AGAIN. I grew up there, and both of the houses I grew up in are now gone. I feel so bad for the kids...That had to be absolutely terrifying. :(

The thing I was wondering is that there was a spot where the two tracks they were showing crossed each other, but I couldn't tell from the map whether it was a bunch of fields outside the suburbs still, or whether some people might have got hit in both 99 and now 13.


s.imwx.com

And http://kfor.com/2013/05/20/interactive-map-1999-2003-2013-moore-torna d oes/ which kind of shorts the 1999 path.

Looks like it's mostly open, but there's some widely-spaced houses which would have been in the path of both.
 
2013-05-21 09:03:46 AM

Mr_H: I live in mid Michigan and we don't really have tornadoes here. Grew up in Iowa, saw a couple F3s and F4s myself.  Glad I don't have to deal with them as much anymore...but I did just realize there's not really a 'safe' place in my house right now. Unlikely I'd need one, but still...

/should research something someday


I'm in southeast Michigan.  We get tornados pretty much every year, but since most of this area is either farmland or woods, the only real damage is like half an acre of lost produce.  Not exactly news-worthy.

That said, my tornado safe room is the bathroom in the basement.  No windows and underground.
 
Displayed 50 of 565 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report