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(News9 Oklahoma)   Oklahoma tornado thread continued. LGT live updates/streaming   (news9.com) divider line 1131
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5162 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 May 2013 at 7:20 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-20 08:45:16 PM

Bontesla: TommyDeuce: Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: a battery powered radio

I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that,  too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.

In process of a move from Iowa to Georgia - I'm adding a hand-crank light/radio/loud noise maker.

/If you're going to the shack, get a weather radio with an alert function.

Whereabouts in Georgia? I moved from Ohio to ATL-suburb in 2007. There's some pretty great areas around here.


Fayette County, west of Fayetteville
 
2013-05-20 08:45:57 PM

Tom_Slick: Shadow Blasko: Work boots, gloves, helmets, and something that can make a lot of noise, for each person.

Check, Check, nope, nope.  I am making a list.


Cheap bicycle helmets will work better than nothing, but just have something to protect your head, even for after you get out of the saferoom.

Oh, and talk to your doctor or pharmacy about having a 10 day emergency supply of any essential medications for anyone in your family.

And, a list of post-event things you must do. IE - Turn off gas and/or water if possible (have tools to do both) etc
 
2013-05-20 08:45:58 PM

mrshowrules: wxboy: slackerboy: I haven't read the thread, but what we've been talking about here is, why the fark don't schools in a tornado zone have a saferoom?  Reinforced concrete, a couple of feet down.  ~75 people is what I've seen.  It doesn't have to be that big, you can cram them in for the hour or so before help gets there.  This country is retarded.

An average elementary school might have 200 or more students, and you can't just shove kids into a crawl space like sardines every time the sirens sound.  That would probably cause more problems than it solved.  Building something large enough to shelter everyone reasonably could double the cost of building, and in an era when education budgets are already tight, for the low low probability of an event both during school hours and strong enough to render current procedures inadequate.

Better building this then tanks the Pentagon doesn't need.  Infrastructure spending would be could for the economy right now.  Keeps people employed and it should be separate from the education budget.  Plus, you could easily justify this with the frequency of tornadoes in certain areas.


Forecasting now is at a point where schools could reasonably institute a no-school-today policy when these types of things are possible.  It's already been pointed out that this outbreak was predicted several days in advance.  Cancelling school a few days a year and making them up later would be way more cost-effective than building and retrofitting school buildings with storm shelters.
 
2013-05-20 08:46:07 PM

knbber2: Bunny Deville: They do here if it's supposed to be really bad. Generally at noon so it counts as a full day.

Hmm, interesting, I lived down in Montgomery for a year (1998-99), and don't remember that happening although we had some bad storms.  I guess it is pretty rare.


Some years it never happens. Madison County and Cullman County get the worst tornadoes in the WORLD, well I mean apart from this monster. Remember how I would biatch in the football threads about having to work on my thesis? It was on tornado density and proximation/angle to rivers in our area. It ended up just scaring the holy living hell out of me when it was all done. Anyway, the moral of the story is that North Alabama is generally more prone to EF3 and above tornadoes than anywhere else on the planet, so we take that shiat seriously up here.
 
2013-05-20 08:46:07 PM

2xhelix: Just got word, all my family are accounted for safe.  Three did got stuck riding it out at the post office, the horror!


That's wonderful!!!! I'm glad to hear the good news.
 
2013-05-20 08:46:16 PM

TommyDeuce: Al Roeker on the scene in Moore


As if they haven't suffered enough.
 
2013-05-20 08:46:25 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Uchiha_Cycliste: RatOmeter: Uchiha_Cycliste: Can I ask a stupid question?
Do tornadoes really have super strong sucking upwards forces like cartoons depict? Or are the winds just really strong spinning winds that sometimes happen to have debris make their way upwards?
Does the question make sense? Put another way, is the center of a tornado like a vacuum or just fierce spinning winds?

The center sucks, mostly because it's part of the structure that's making the horribly destructive winds that are rotating around it.  Those are the part that cause the destruction.

Thanks, and do you know if it always sucks, or only sometimes (in some tornadoes). Or does it always suck but sometimes not as strongly?!

The one that hit New Hope that I was talking about was only a EF! or EF2 the debris was from a convenience store.


That's just mind boggling. Assuming the debris traveled sideways at the same velocity it was falling, It had to have been sucked over 150K feet straight up!
 
2013-05-20 08:46:33 PM

Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: a battery powered radio

I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that,  too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.

In process of a move from Iowa to Georgia - I'm adding a hand-crank light/radio/loud noise maker.

/If you're going to the shack, get a weather radio with an alert function.

Fortunately F4 and F5 tornadoes are very rare in Georgia, there are plenty of smaller ones and if you live in a hilly area like I do you get zero visual warning.


Hilly, wooded area - totally going to have the weather-radio plugged in with battery back-up
 
2013-05-20 08:46:37 PM

Mrs.Sharpier: star_topology: People who risk their lives for animals are a special group. That's the second one today they've interviewed.

I feel awful for all the lame horses standing about, they'll all be put down no doubt. I know human loss is infinitely more tragic but animals are just as innocent as children. Poor biatches.


Yeah, just because they are on their feet doesn't mean they're OK.  Hopefully any that are suffering will be put down ASAP.
 
2013-05-20 08:47:14 PM

basemetal: It's bad in Moore, folks, really bad. Surprised the body count isn't higher.


It will be, that's just from a couple of schools, they haven't gotten to the subdivisions yet.
 
2013-05-20 08:47:15 PM
No, I know it will go higher, but you have to see it to understand what I'm saying.

/two people I know (separate houses) have been wiped out, like to the foundation
//a couple of relatives have not been accounted for and we are waiting to hear back
///it literally looks like the place was bombed
 
2013-05-20 08:47:19 PM

skozlaw: basemetal: It's bad in Moore, folks, really bad. Surprised the body count isn't higher.

I hate to be negative but.... yet.

When I first started watching it was four, then ten, now thirty seven.

They ain't done digging. Not by a good measure.


Yeah, I wouldn't take any count as gospel until at least 24 hours have passed. Sigh. Just horrifying. I can't believe the awful news on those kiddos. Worst worst worst.
 
2013-05-20 08:47:29 PM

Witchydiva: DesktopHippie: Listening to that KFOR reporter realising on air that his house is gone and he has no idea where he is going to sleep tonight. "Guess I could sleep in my office at the news station..."

No, no - he said "IF" his house was gone, now that it was.


Oh good - I came in right as he said he had "no idea" where he was going. Hope his house is okay. Dude has had a pretty horrible day.
 
2013-05-20 08:47:43 PM
shiatty day! hold your loved ones close tonight
 
2013-05-20 08:47:43 PM

TommyDeuce: Bontesla: TommyDeuce: Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: a battery powered radio

I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that,  too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.

In process of a move from Iowa to Georgia - I'm adding a hand-crank light/radio/loud noise maker.

/If you're going to the shack, get a weather radio with an alert function.

Whereabouts in Georgia? I moved from Ohio to ATL-suburb in 2007. There's some pretty great areas around here.

Fayette County, west of Fayetteville


Oh no way. I'm in Coweta County (Senoia to be exact). That's a pretty good area. Welcome to Georgia!
 
2013-05-20 08:47:45 PM

Tom_Slick: I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that, too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.


Get one that also has a hand cranked generator built in as a backup. You only need to crank it for a few seconds every 10 minutes or so. Something like this one or this one with a built in LED flashlight.
 
2013-05-20 08:47:50 PM

TommyDeuce: Bontesla: TommyDeuce: Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: a battery powered radio

I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that,  too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.

In process of a move from Iowa to Georgia - I'm adding a hand-crank light/radio/loud noise maker.

/If you're going to the shack, get a weather radio with an alert function.

Whereabouts in Georgia? I moved from Ohio to ATL-suburb in 2007. There's some pretty great areas around here.

Fayette County, west of Fayetteville


I lived and finished high school in Peachtree City.  I live on Lake Lanier now in a town whose name I hate to mention aloud.
 
2013-05-20 08:47:54 PM

Tom_Slick: Shadow Blasko: TommyDeuce: Sounds like underground didn't work out so well for some at the school.

/Still the best place
//Our "Tornado Room" has a wrecking bar and a hatchet in it for digging/hacking out

No, in this case it didn't.

95% of the time it is. It's also easier for emergency services after the storm.

And good! I am glad you are prepared. I've been in many tornadoes and I have a "go bag" and a good precaution list too.. but, not everyone does.

My house is on a slab and has a "Tornado Closet" (read steel reinforced concrete box in the center of the house) I keep my go bag,  pry-bar, hatchet and a case of water. Should I have anything else in there?



Flashlight! And maybe a basic first aid kit, too.
 
2013-05-20 08:48:02 PM

wxboy: mrshowrules: wxboy: slackerboy: I haven't read the thread, but what we've been talking about here is, why the fark don't schools in a tornado zone have a saferoom?  Reinforced concrete, a couple of feet down.  ~75 people is what I've seen.  It doesn't have to be that big, you can cram them in for the hour or so before help gets there.  This country is retarded.

An average elementary school might have 200 or more students, and you can't just shove kids into a crawl space like sardines every time the sirens sound.  That would probably cause more problems than it solved.  Building something large enough to shelter everyone reasonably could double the cost of building, and in an era when education budgets are already tight, for the low low probability of an event both during school hours and strong enough to render current procedures inadequate.

Better building this then tanks the Pentagon doesn't need.  Infrastructure spending would be could for the economy right now.  Keeps people employed and it should be separate from the education budget.  Plus, you could easily justify this with the frequency of tornadoes in certain areas.

Forecasting now is at a point where schools could reasonably institute a no-school-today policy when these types of things are possible.  It's already been pointed out that this outbreak was predicted several days in advance.  Cancelling school a few days a year and making them up later would be way more cost-effective than building and retrofitting school buildings with storm shelters.


For many people, they can't afford to stay home from work or risk being laid off for doing so.  It comes back to economic drivers again.
 
2013-05-20 08:48:18 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: Okay. So if I understand correctly, debris can get sucked way up if the drafts are right but primarily its just fierce spinning winds. In other words cartoons and media have taken some creative liberties with what the middle of a tornado does. Thanks!


Tornados do suck.  The wall clouds where they form are a huge low pressure system and that cases an updraft that tends to go from about 3,000 feet up to about 30,000.  Hail bounces around in that from the updraft so the vertical winds happen to be high enough to counter gravity for things like grape fruit sized chunks of ice.  As those wall clouds get close to the ground, you can get the characteristic funnel and once that forms, the forces in it help reinforce the vertical air flow as cyclone helps drive air away from the low pressure point at the center.   The NWS skywarn web site has lots of useful on how they work.
 
2013-05-20 08:48:34 PM
Fayette County, west of Fayetteville


---------


near Fayetteville here.
Just FYI, we get tornadoes too.
Spalding County / Henry County / Fayetteville-Griffin-Hampton got hit in 2011.
Six dead then. Was an F3.
 
2013-05-20 08:48:35 PM
Ugh... NBC is at the point where they don't know what to talk about anymore because there's no new info so they're just saying stupid, pointless shiat.
 
2013-05-20 08:49:18 PM

Enormous-Schwanstucker: http://kfor.com/2013/05/20/efforts-switch-to-recovery-at-moore-okla-e l ementary-school/

From the article....
First responders told KFOR-TV's Lance West they don't believe there are anymore survivors in the Plaza Towers Elementary school.

So far the bodies of seven children have been recovered.

Crews said they believe 20 to 30 more children may be inside but again, do not believe there are anymore survivors.


 Let that sink in for a minute. I harp on our school system here in Northern Va for hitting the goddamn panic button. No more. Never. Ever.
I can't even find the right words right now.
I yelled at my daughter earlier for something rather innocuous. We're heading downstairs for some ice cream.


Like I said earlier, I spent the morning at my daughter's elementary school hanging out with the fourth graders at their party and awards ceremony. Then I came home to hear this. When I heard about the confirmed bodies at plaza towers, I literally started crying while I was at publix picking up my son's prescription.
 
2013-05-20 08:49:29 PM

basemetal: No, I know it will go higher, but you have to see it to understand what I'm saying.

/two people I know (separate houses) have been wiped out, like to the foundation
//a couple of relatives have not been accounted for and we are waiting to hear back
///it literally looks like the place was bombed


I've heard that Moore Medical is destroyed. Dispatchers were trying to contact the facility....
 
2013-05-20 08:49:32 PM

Shadow Blasko: Tom_Slick: Shadow Blasko: Work boots, gloves, helmets, and something that can make a lot of noise, for each person.

Check, Check, nope, nope.  I am making a list.

Cheap bicycle helmets will work better than nothing, but just have something to protect your head, even for after you get out of the saferoom.

Oh, and talk to your doctor or pharmacy about having a 10 day emergency supply of any essential medications for anyone in your family.

And, a list of post-event things you must do. IE - Turn off gas and/or water if possible (have tools to do both) etc


They interviewed a lady earlier she was still wearing a batters helmet, cool lady she was obviously shaken up but alive.
 
2013-05-20 08:49:45 PM

optikeye: Geeze their interviewing one guy that's home was destroyed and he's talking about how all his guns where in a gun safe and he only lost one gun. Seriously, WTF dude.


1. Your home is destroyed by a huge massive force and you miraculously survive- he is probably in a bit of a daze/shock.

2. People don't practice what they are going to say when their home is destroyed and the news want to interview them.

3. Give the guy a break his home was destroyed and he probably has no idea what friends and neighbors have or have not lost.
 
2013-05-20 08:49:49 PM

Shadow Blasko: Tom_Slick: Shadow Blasko: Work boots, gloves, helmets, and something that can make a lot of noise, for each person.

Check, Check, nope, nope.  I am making a list.

Cheap bicycle helmets will work better than nothing, but just have something to protect your head, even for after you get out of the saferoom.

Oh, and talk to your doctor or pharmacy about having a 10 day emergency supply of any essential medications for anyone in your family.

And, a list of post-event things you must do. IE - Turn off gas and/or water if possible (have tools to do both) etc


If vision is bad for anyone in the family, include a spare set of glasses in that go-bag (keep your last set in there when they're replaced if you can't afford a good new set).
 
2013-05-20 08:49:59 PM
Dr. Greg Forbes has given this tornado a rating of EF-5 and if anybody knows it is Forbes. He studied under Fujita.

I'm at a loss for words. I really am. I love chasing, I love tornadoes but I can't stand seeing them hit populated areas like this, especially when people get killed. If only we could have every tornado be in a field far from civilization.

My thoughts are with the families, the first responders, anyone who has seen this devastation first hand and even to the farkers here watching it and somehow finding conversation and silver linings. This is just horrific.
 
2013-05-20 08:50:03 PM

Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: a battery powered radio

I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that,  too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.


get something like this: http://www.etoncorp.com/en/productdisplay/solarlink-fr370

/mine has a LLBean branding instead of ARC, otherwise identical
 
2013-05-20 08:50:07 PM
Whereabouts in Georgia? I moved from Ohio to ATL-suburb in 2007. There's some pretty great areas around here.
Fayette County, west of Fayetteville
I lived and finished high school in Peachtree City.  I live on Lake Lanier now in a town whose name I hate to mention aloud.

-------------------------------
Cacapoopypeepyshire?

Oh wait, that's West of Atlanta........
 
2013-05-20 08:50:17 PM

Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: Bontesla: TommyDeuce: Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: a battery powered radio

I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that,  too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.

In process of a move from Iowa to Georgia - I'm adding a hand-crank light/radio/loud noise maker.

/If you're going to the shack, get a weather radio with an alert function.

Whereabouts in Georgia? I moved from Ohio to ATL-suburb in 2007. There's some pretty great areas around here.

Fayette County, west of Fayetteville

I lived and finished high school in Peachtree City.  I live on Lake Lanier now in a town whose name I hate to mention aloud.


I work in PTC. They have some pretty stellar school systems.
 
2013-05-20 08:50:26 PM

Tom_Slick: I live on Lake Lanier now in a town whose name I hate to mention aloud.


Cumming?

/only Georgia town I can think of with a name that would qualify
 
2013-05-20 08:50:40 PM

Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: Bontesla: TommyDeuce: Tom_Slick: TommyDeuce: a battery powered radio

I am a dumbass, I honestly did not think of that,  too reliant on internet based tech.

/Off to Radio Shack in the morning.

In process of a move from Iowa to Georgia - I'm adding a hand-crank light/radio/loud noise maker.

/If you're going to the shack, get a weather radio with an alert function.

Whereabouts in Georgia? I moved from Ohio to ATL-suburb in 2007. There's some pretty great areas around here.

Fayette County, west of Fayetteville

I lived and finished high school in Peachtree City.  I live on Lake Lanier now in a town whose name I hate to mention aloud.


Apartment I'm in for the rest of the week is in PTC - love walking the trails (and dodging golf carts)

/We'll have to set up a "south of ATL" Fark party - on a less stressful night.
 
2013-05-20 08:50:52 PM

Bontesla: basemetal: No, I know it will go higher, but you have to see it to understand what I'm saying.

/two people I know (separate houses) have been wiped out, like to the foundation
//a couple of relatives have not been accounted for and we are waiting to hear back
///it literally looks like the place was bombed

I've heard that Moore Medical is destroyed. Dispatchers were trying to contact the facility....


Considering there's about a couple dozen cars stacked up in at the main entrance, I'd imagine it's pretty bad.
 
2013-05-20 08:51:02 PM

Fiction Fan: Fayette County, west of Fayetteville


---------


near Fayetteville here.
Just FYI, we get tornadoes too.
Spalding County / Henry County / Fayetteville-Griffin-Hampton got hit in 2011.
Six dead then. Was an F3.


Yeah, I knew people who lost everything in Griffin.
 
2013-05-20 08:51:21 PM

wxboy: mrshowrules: wxboy: slackerboy: I haven't read the thread, but what we've been talking about here is, why the fark don't schools in a tornado zone have a saferoom?  Reinforced concrete, a couple of feet down.  ~75 people is what I've seen.  It doesn't have to be that big, you can cram them in for the hour or so before help gets there.  This country is retarded.

An average elementary school might have 200 or more students, and you can't just shove kids into a crawl space like sardines every time the sirens sound.  That would probably cause more problems than it solved.  Building something large enough to shelter everyone reasonably could double the cost of building, and in an era when education budgets are already tight, for the low low probability of an event both during school hours and strong enough to render current procedures inadequate.

Better building this then tanks the Pentagon doesn't need.  Infrastructure spending would be could for the economy right now.  Keeps people employed and it should be separate from the education budget.  Plus, you could easily justify this with the frequency of tornadoes in certain areas.

Forecasting now is at a point where schools could reasonably institute a no-school-today policy when these types of things are possible.  It's already been pointed out that this outbreak was predicted several days in advance.  Cancelling school a few days a year and making them up later would be way more cost-effective than building and retrofitting school buildings with storm shelters.


Incredibly Counterproductive

This is a tragedy.  Having all those kids at home (and all the parents at home with them) in their particle board houses would have been an even worse tragedy.
 
2013-05-20 08:51:29 PM

WhyteRaven74: Tom_Slick: I live on Lake Lanier now in a town whose name I hate to mention aloud.

Cumming?

/only Georgia town I can think of with a name that would qualify


Winner Winner Chicken Dinner
 
2013-05-20 08:52:17 PM

mrshowrules: wxboy: mrshowrules: wxboy: slackerboy: I haven't read the thread, but what we've been talking about here is, why the fark don't schools in a tornado zone have a saferoom?  Reinforced concrete, a couple of feet down.  ~75 people is what I've seen.  It doesn't have to be that big, you can cram them in for the hour or so before help gets there.  This country is retarded.

An average elementary school might have 200 or more students, and you can't just shove kids into a crawl space like sardines every time the sirens sound.  That would probably cause more problems than it solved.  Building something large enough to shelter everyone reasonably could double the cost of building, and in an era when education budgets are already tight, for the low low probability of an event both during school hours and strong enough to render current procedures inadequate.

Better building this then tanks the Pentagon doesn't need.  Infrastructure spending would be could for the economy right now.  Keeps people employed and it should be separate from the education budget.  Plus, you could easily justify this with the frequency of tornadoes in certain areas.

Forecasting now is at a point where schools could reasonably institute a no-school-today policy when these types of things are possible.  It's already been pointed out that this outbreak was predicted several days in advance.  Cancelling school a few days a year and making them up later would be way more cost-effective than building and retrofitting school buildings with storm shelters.

For many people, they can't afford to stay home from work or risk being laid off for doing so.  It comes back to economic drivers again.


If parents can deal with snow days, they can deal with tornado days.  Of course some can't, but that's true everywhere.
 
2013-05-20 08:52:19 PM

Professor Farksworth: 'm at a loss for words. I really am. I love chasing, I love tornadoes but I can't stand seeing them hit populated areas like this, especially when people get killed. If only we could have every tornado be in a field far from civilization.


Just imagine if this was a few miles north up in OKC proper.
 
2013-05-20 08:52:22 PM

TommyDeuce: Apartment I'm in for the rest of the week is in PTC - love walking the trails (and dodging golf carts)


You can get a DUI on a Golf Cart just ask the former Mayor.
 
2013-05-20 08:52:25 PM
Ugh... NBC is at the point where they don't know what to talk about anymore because there's no new info so they're just saying stupid, pointless shiat.
-----

So business as usual then.
 
2013-05-20 08:52:41 PM

DON.MAC: Uchiha_Cycliste: Okay. So if I understand correctly, debris can get sucked way up if the drafts are right but primarily its just fierce spinning winds. In other words cartoons and media have taken some creative liberties with what the middle of a tornado does. Thanks!

Tornados do suck.  The wall clouds where they form are a huge low pressure system and that cases an updraft that tends to go from about 3,000 feet up to about 30,000.  Hail bounces around in that from the updraft so the vertical winds happen to be high enough to counter gravity for things like grape fruit sized chunks of ice.  As those wall clouds get close to the ground, you can get the characteristic funnel and once that forms, the forces in it help reinforce the vertical air flow as cyclone helps drive air away from the low pressure point at the center.   The NWS skywarn web site has lots of useful on how they work.


Thanks! Do you know what it is like way above the tornado?
Does that suction dissipate above the clouds, or create a huge upwards force for miles upwards? would a plane flying at 40,000 feet, 10,000 ft above the top of the clouds be safe?
 
2013-05-20 08:52:51 PM

Tom_Slick: Shadow Blasko: Work boots, gloves, helmets, and something that can make a lot of noise, for each person.

Check, Check, nope, nope.  I am making a list.


May want to add a handheld cb radio. Cell towers will be down and if you are trapped it may be the only way to communicate.
 
2013-05-20 08:53:02 PM
BBC have put up a handful of photos of the damage and rescue efforts.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-22605020

That looks pretty farked up.
 
2013-05-20 08:53:03 PM

mrshowrules: wxboy: mrshowrules: wxboy: slackerboy: I haven't read the thread, but what we've been talking about here is, why the fark don't schools in a tornado zone have a saferoom?  Reinforced concrete, a couple of feet down.  ~75 people is what I've seen.  It doesn't have to be that big, you can cram them in for the hour or so before help gets there.  This country is retarded.

An average elementary school might have 200 or more students, and you can't just shove kids into a crawl space like sardines every time the sirens sound.  That would probably cause more problems than it solved.  Building something large enough to shelter everyone reasonably could double the cost of building, and in an era when education budgets are already tight, for the low low probability of an event both during school hours and strong enough to render current procedures inadequate.

Better building this then tanks the Pentagon doesn't need.  Infrastructure spending would be could for the economy right now.  Keeps people employed and it should be separate from the education budget.  Plus, you could easily justify this with the frequency of tornadoes in certain areas.

Forecasting now is at a point where schools could reasonably institute a no-school-today policy when these types of things are possible.  It's already been pointed out that this outbreak was predicted several days in advance.  Cancelling school a few days a year and making them up later would be way more cost-effective than building and retrofitting school buildings with storm shelters.

For many people, they can't afford to stay home from work or risk being laid off for doing so.  It comes back to economic drivers again.


And what happens if they cancel school & people stay home from and then nothing touches down? It'd be like canceling for a snowstorm & then it doesn't snow. People be mighty pissed about it. AND another unintended consequence is that the next time they try to shut down for severe weather, people won't believe them. "Well last time nothing happened....." It's a fine line to walk. I wouldn't want my hand on the big red [siren] button.
 
2013-05-20 08:53:14 PM

spidermilk: optikeye: Geeze their interviewing one guy that's home was destroyed and he's talking about how all his guns where in a gun safe and he only lost one gun. Seriously, WTF dude.

1. Your home is destroyed by a huge massive force and you miraculously survive- he is probably in a bit of a daze/shock.

2. People don't practice what they are going to say when their home is destroyed and the news want to interview them.

3. Give the guy a break his home was destroyed and he probably has no idea what friends and neighbors have or have not lost.


I don't think they were giving him a hard time .. It's just .. WTF do you do kinda thing.
 
2013-05-20 08:53:26 PM

wxboy: slackerboy: I haven't read the thread, but what we've been talking about here is, why the fark don't schools in a tornado zone have a saferoom?  Reinforced concrete, a couple of feet down.  ~75 people is what I've seen.  It doesn't have to be that big, you can cram them in for the hour or so before help gets there.  This country is retarded.

An average elementary school might have 200 or more students, and you can't just shove kids into a crawl space like sardines every time the sirens sound.  That would probably cause more problems than it solved.  Building something large enough to shelter everyone reasonably could double the cost of building, and in an era when education budgets are already tight, for the low low probability of an event both during school hours and strong enough to render current procedures inadequate.

That's a good point.  You can't cram the students into a safe room  every time there's a warning, but this time they had a bit of time to prepare.  I watched this develop , and it's killing me that they had nowhere safe to go, but they still had to have known that this was coming.  They evaced the older grades earlier to a church or something like that.  I'm just pissed about, this and not really trying to argue anything.  I just think it could have been avoided.

 
2013-05-20 08:54:09 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: DON.MAC: Uchiha_Cycliste: Okay. So if I understand correctly, debris can get sucked way up if the drafts are right but primarily its just fierce spinning winds. In other words cartoons and media have taken some creative liberties with what the middle of a tornado does. Thanks!

Tornados do suck.  The wall clouds where they form are a huge low pressure system and that cases an updraft that tends to go from about 3,000 feet up to about 30,000.  Hail bounces around in that from the updraft so the vertical winds happen to be high enough to counter gravity for things like grape fruit sized chunks of ice.  As those wall clouds get close to the ground, you can get the characteristic funnel and once that forms, the forces in it help reinforce the vertical air flow as cyclone helps drive air away from the low pressure point at the center.   The NWS skywarn web site has lots of useful on how they work.

Thanks! Do you know what it is like way above the tornado?
Does that suction dissipate above the clouds, or create a huge upwards force for miles upwards? would a plane flying at 40,000 feet, 10,000 ft above the top of the clouds be safe?


It would likely have some hellacious turbulence due to the updraft/downdraft. Planes don't fly through thunderstorms tall enough to produce q tornado, though.
 
2013-05-20 08:54:10 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: tinfoil-hat maggie: Uchiha_Cycliste: RatOmeter: Uchiha_Cycliste: Can I ask a stupid question?
Do tornadoes really have super strong sucking upwards forces like cartoons depict? Or are the winds just really strong spinning winds that sometimes happen to have debris make their way upwards?
Does the question make sense? Put another way, is the center of a tornado like a vacuum or just fierce spinning winds?

The center sucks, mostly because it's part of the structure that's making the horribly destructive winds that are rotating around it.  Those are the part that cause the destruction.

Thanks, and do you know if it always sucks, or only sometimes (in some tornadoes). Or does it always suck but sometimes not as strongly?!

The one that hit New Hope that I was talking about was only a EF! or EF2 the debris was from a convenience store.

That's just mind boggling. Assuming the debris traveled sideways at the same velocity it was falling, It had to have been sucked over 150K feet straight up!


A storm that spawns even a small tornado is 50'000 or so feet tall the ones today were bigger and if you could have seen the a pics of the supercells from afar they would have had the classic anvil head shape at the top of the storm which means they have gotten as tall as a storm can get.
 
2013-05-20 08:54:15 PM

Bunny Deville: Anyway, the moral of the story is that North Alabama is generally more prone to EF3 and above tornadoes than anywhere else on the planet, so we take that shiat seriously up here.


Jeez, didn't know that.  I've lived in several states that are prone and I've been through a few (luckily missed our house), but other than the Omaha tornado, they were relatively small.  You keep your head down and stay safe.
 
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