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(KOCO Oklahoma City) NewsFlash Large tornado on ground right now -in- OKC   (koco.com) divider line 1221
    More: NewsFlash, Steve McClain, tornado warning, OKC, Oklahoma, tornadoes  
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15547 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 May 2013 at 4:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»


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2013-05-20 05:47:01 PM

Popcorn Johnny: What's the link for the scanner feed?


the okc one, anyway


http://www.broadcastify.com/listen/ctid/2182
 
2013-05-20 05:47:15 PM
You know it'ss bad when they're reporting through tears. My god.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:18 PM
75 children in the classroom? That's a serious over crowding problem.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:25 PM

katfairy: According to some sources I've read, the average thunderstorm releases something on the order of twelve Hiroshima-sized nukes worth of energy every minute.  An  average thunderstorm.  Tornadoes?  I would imagine they would be a bit worse.


It is hard to convert Hiroshima-sized nukes to Libraries of Congress so I'll use something we all may be able to relate to - Watt-hours... Best I could come up with on the Googles for a strong thunderstorm puts it into the tera-watt-hour range - now to frame that it is NINE times the output of the PJM Interconnect for one hour - that's all the electricity consumed in most of DE, PA, OH, IN, KY, WV, VA, MD, DC, and NJ for one hour.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:29 PM

Andromeda: 75 kids trapped in debris at the school

I hope CNN is wrong


They are, of course.  Local news saying 75 people sheltering in place at the time the storm hit.  Some are out.  So some number less than 75 presumably trapped.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:33 PM

Andromeda: 75 kids trapped in debris at the school

I hope CNN is wrong


They probably aren't. They sent our asses to the hallway when we had drills. Few schools have meaningful subterranean space.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:43 PM

theurge14: This is not a repeat from 1999.


I was there 5/3/1999 ...  Now I'm in New Mexico.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:48 PM
I am getting a bad vibe, like we're going to see Jim McKay giving us the "worst of time" final report.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:50 PM

Almost Everybody Poops: Orr Farm is destroyed!


top 10 OKC tourist attraction...agriculture education and entertainment....site is down but I found this pic:


cdnb1.trekaroo.com
 
2013-05-20 05:47:52 PM
4 year old and 3 month old baby didn't make it :((
 
2013-05-20 05:47:52 PM
Mother of Christ
 
2013-05-20 05:47:55 PM

PowerSlacker: zappaisfrank: Before watching the TV coverage of this, I had no idea there was a town in Oklahoma called "Liberal"...

[i5.photobucket.com image 515x455]

That's actually Liberal, Kansas.


It's KS where Liberal lies just doesn't have the same ring.
 
2013-05-20 05:47:59 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: I'm only imagining these things being a few hundred to thousand feet. Less than record-breaking skyscrapers, though admittedly we're asking it to take an enormous amount of side-winds. You'd almost need a super-structure to help them strengthen each other, and at that point it's basically a giant dumb dome to kill everyone when it collapses.

Um, no the supercells that spawn tornadoes are 60,000+ ft tall and mountains although they can affect them they don't stop them. I live in an area that's had some bad tornadoes and has mountains.


Does nobody read the rest of the thread? I know the STORM is that tall, but you only need to disturb the bottom layer.

mr lawson: LasersHurt: jst3p: LasersHurt: But this idea that tornados are unstoppable, forever, by anything, at all, is ridiculous and I won't have it.

That isn't what you originally asked. Currently we can't build a vertical structure to break up the ground speed of a tornado, because ... we can't.

Well, that's a bit obvious. I guess I should have phrased it more to the effect of "is anyone currently researching the idea of breaking up the ground level winds of a tornado." I can't imagine it's TECHNICALLY impossible, just improbable or uneconomical.

well THAT's totally different.
Yes you can.
basically, one would have to build a sloping ring (think volcano) around a city and then put a dome on top.
as the tornado approaches the slope (example west to east track) air in front of the tornado would be pull down the slope until the vertical twister consumed itself. The result would be the back side to the tornado would  become parallel to the ground, until it reached the slope and the increase of pressure would dissipate it.
At least until it reached the east side of the slope where it would reform*.

*pulled out of my ass


I had imagined it as a group of specially shaped towers designed to push the wind into "random" directions in the bottom layer, breaking it up. My worry is they'd be so large, and so close together, that the towers would make up most of the cityscape.
 
2013-05-20 05:48:01 PM
Five year old boy and a baby :-(
 
2013-05-20 05:48:08 PM
4 year old child and 3 month old baby  died
 
2013-05-20 05:48:08 PM

LasersHurt: You don't need to stop the whole thing, just disturb the bottom-most part to lower wind speeds.


You. Can't. The funnel is the focus of rotation of a ten-mile high wall of rotation. It is the single point of the fastest winds and rotation of the storm. The power involved cannot be prevented by engineering, but only endured. There is no way- and I cannot stress that enough -to slow it down, to nudge it, or to disrupt it. Few buildings can withstand a strong (EF3, some EF4) tornadoes, and incredibly few can withstand anything stronger; it is a matter of endurance. Tornadoes cannot be impacted by anything other than the ingredients in the atmosphere that create the storm to begin with. If anything, that's where you begin. But since large-scale projects (read: hurricane seeding) haven't yielded meaningful results, it's unlikely that would even help.

You cannot stop a tornado; you can only hope that it misses you. This is not faith in the mystic, but rather a statement of fact.
 
2013-05-20 05:48:13 PM
How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?
 
2013-05-20 05:48:16 PM
30 were pulled out alive, they're unsure how many more are still in the rubble.
 
2013-05-20 05:48:30 PM

Now That's What I Call a Taco!: 75 kids could be buried under the debris at one of the schools

:-(


Local news was saying they've pulled 30 of those out alive so far.
 
2013-05-20 05:48:51 PM

ariseatex: PowerSlacker: ohdoublereally: Dear Mrs. ohdoublereally, here's another frigging reason I don't want to move from San Diego to Oklahoma.

Why would anyone want to do that...ever?

Jobs.  There's a lot of meteorology jobs, both governmental and private, centered around Norman (just a few miles to the south).  That's the only reason I'd ever move to Oklahoma, to work there.


Great schools.  Low(ish) cost of living.

RatOmeter: Di Atribe: MartinaMcSorley: Yeah, it seems like the best meteorologists come from Oklahoma. I guess I was just wondering if there is some sort of very local topography that makes some places more tornado-y than others. Like, with earthquakes, places that are/were wetlands shake worse than places that are solid granite. So, I was wondering if maybe hills or bodies of water could channel tornadoes into certain areas. Honestly, though, from what I see of OKC, there isn't a hill in the whole state. That place is flat, flat, flat!

There are some short-ish mountains just south of OKC. That may contribute to a bit of direction. But it's not a guarantee. Chickashaw took a hit last year, I believe. But  you're right, outside of those mountains, it is amazingly flat. Nothin between them & Canada but a barbed wire fence.

Actually, OK has 12 unique "eco regions" that correspond roughly to different types of geography.  Forests in the ESE, tall rolling green hills in part of the NE, planes, mesas, grassland, sand dunes - all sorts of terrain.


I have inlaws that live there.  I'd like to visit some time.  Not in tornado season, though.  Thanks to all the Farkers explaining tornadoes.
 
2013-05-20 05:48:55 PM

poe_zlaw: megalynn44: netizencain: do the elementary schools have basements in OKC?

The news is saying basements in OK are rare because the ground is rock, which means you have to use dynomite to blast out a basement.

Funny. I am in the underground business and have dug holes 55 ft deep, 100 ft across.  I wonder how these work. ;)[i73.photobucket.com image 600x800]


Not sure if serious, considering your name, but it's not that simple, considering the geography. If basements were possible, don't you think we'd all have one? You think you're the first person to have this idea?
 
2013-05-20 05:49:11 PM
That lady was telling Carl off. "Getting more information from her"
 
2013-05-20 05:49:18 PM

Almost Everybody Poops: 4 year old and 3 month old baby didn't make it :((


Totally didn't need to hear that. I'm sitting here in sunny Chicagoland with my son in daycare - and I'm gonna be hugging him tight once he gets home.
 
2013-05-20 05:49:31 PM

Gyrfalcon: Bye!


soporific: To paraphrase the great Tater Salad, "It's not THAT the wind is blowing, it's WHAT the wind is blowing."


Almost Everybody Poops: It'll respect your right to be swept off your feet.


I was hopeful for: qoH vuvbe' SuS.
 
2013-05-20 05:49:34 PM
pbs.twimg.com
 
2013-05-20 05:49:47 PM

netizencain: How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?


Someone who wants the children away from any glass windows?
 
2013-05-20 05:49:49 PM
A farmer let his horses loose "So they could have a chance," then jumped into a horse stall and survived under the debris.

"Just like the movie Twister" he said.
 
2013-05-20 05:50:05 PM

poe_zlaw: megalynn44: netizencain: do the elementary schools have basements in OKC?

The news is saying basements in OK are rare because the ground is rock, which means you have to use dynomite to blast out a basement.

Funny. I am in the underground business and have dug holes 55 ft deep, 100 ft across.  I wonder how these work. ;)[i73.photobucket.com image 600x800]



Becuase adding 50K to the cost of a house is totally practical.
 
2013-05-20 05:50:22 PM

ArtosRC: LasersHurt: You don't need to stop the whole thing, just disturb the bottom-most part to lower wind speeds.

You. Can't. The funnel is the focus of rotation of a ten-mile high wall of rotation. It is the single point of the fastest winds and rotation of the storm. The power involved cannot be prevented by engineering, but only endured. There is no way- and I cannot stress that enough -to slow it down, to nudge it, or to disrupt it. Few buildings can withstand a strong (EF3, some EF4) tornadoes, and incredibly few can withstand anything stronger; it is a matter of endurance. Tornadoes cannot be impacted by anything other than the ingredients in the atmosphere that create the storm to begin with. If anything, that's where you begin. But since large-scale projects (read: hurricane seeding) haven't yielded meaningful results, it's unlikely that would even help.

You cannot stop a tornado; you can only hope that it misses you. This is not faith in the mystic, but rather a statement of fact.


Any fluid can have its movement disrupted. It's just a matter of how much you have to disturb it, and where you disturb it.  Never say never. "Not right now," well, that's another thing.
 
2013-05-20 05:50:35 PM

LeadFootSpiderMonkey: I dont have TF right now, so I can't post a TFD thread. We have family in Wagoner, Ok, the storms are headed there, I dont think they have a safe place to hunker down, any TFers in the area have a little extra room?????


Reposted in TFD. Good luck to your family!
 
2013-05-20 05:50:43 PM

netizencain: How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?


Only space in the building without windows?  It's not the safest place imaginable, but it's the safest place in the building.  If what I'm hearing about the water table preventing basement building, then the hallway is as safe as you can get.
 
2013-05-20 05:50:50 PM

Di Atribe: poe_zlaw: megalynn44: netizencain: do the elementary schools have basements in OKC?

The news is saying basements in OK are rare because the ground is rock, which means you have to use dynomite to blast out a basement.

Funny. I am in the underground business and have dug holes 55 ft deep, 100 ft across.  I wonder how these work. ;)[i73.photobucket.com image 600x800]

Not sure if serious, considering your name, but it's not that simple, considering the geography. If basements were possible, don't you think we'd all have one? You think you're the first person to have this idea?


They're pretty much always possible.  You can even dig one down into the water table.  It's what is affordable.  Excavation is more expensive than just uilding a concrete pad and throwing some sticks on top of it.
 
2013-05-20 05:51:12 PM

netizencain: How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?


School Administrators (also school board and other various governmental yahoos) who can't afford to do the additions to make it safe.
 
2013-05-20 05:51:20 PM

mikaloyd: They need some big ass skiploaders or something to clear paths for Emergency crews just to get through


They might need to check the wreckage for survivors first, though.  You wouldn't want to just plow though someone trapped in a car or trapped under debris.  Ugh.
 
2013-05-20 05:51:22 PM

Dusk-You-n-Me: [pbs.twimg.com image 768x1024]


Needs the "objects in mirror are larger than they appear" text.
 
2013-05-20 05:51:23 PM

ArtosRC: Jesus, the tornado outside of White Bead/Pauls Valley is as massive as the Moore tornado.


On the KOCO feed, when it came into view on the reporter's stream you could hear audible gasps in the background in the newsroom.
 
2013-05-20 05:51:43 PM
fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net
 
2013-05-20 05:52:14 PM
I just got online and have been looking at what is happening and holy freekn cow.

All I can do is pray for you guys for whatever you think that is worth, being up in the northwest.

Stay safe OK farkers.
 
2013-05-20 05:52:17 PM

ringersol: ArtosRC: "This is a force of nature. It cannot be stopped."

Neither can hurricanes. But as it turns out, there are man-made structures that we can put in their path that are wildly 'profitable' in reducing storm damage and improving outcomes.


Tornadoes are not hurricanes. And the man-made structures you are talking about deal with waves/water. Not wind. Tornadoes are wind. And faster and stronger winds than hurricanes.
 
2013-05-20 05:52:20 PM

ariseatex: netizencain: How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?

Only space in the building without windows?  It's not the safest place imaginable, but it's the safest place in the building.  If what I'm hearing about the water table preventing basement building, then the hallway is as safe as you can get.


Yep. The water table is too high for a basement here, too. The schools are also specially built to be able to withstand most tornadoes, especially since we had an elementary school taken out in 89. That said, people need to understand that an F5 is a different deal.
 
2013-05-20 05:52:35 PM

uncleacid: The Weather Channel is like, what a terrible tragedy but our ratings are going through the roof.


I can't actually get weather information relevent to me on there. They're too busy milking the scenes of carnage to say something like "hey, there's a tornado a few dozen miles from you" (which there is, heh)
As much as I hate the monopoly that is Cox Cable, I do like their emergency service bulletin things that cuts the TV feed to give the tornado warning.
 
2013-05-20 05:52:50 PM
LasersHurt:Never say never. "Not right now," well, that's another thing.

Appropriate. Modern technology has no way to combat such.
 
2013-05-20 05:53:03 PM

netizencain: How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?


When you don't have a below-ground shelter, an interior hallway is the safe zone. It's away from exterior walls (which contain windows). And it's (usually) a narrow enough roof area that the roof (if it is damaged) won't fall in and crush the people under it. Ideally.
 
2013-05-20 05:53:05 PM
i706.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-20 05:53:12 PM

Di Atribe: poe_zlaw: megalynn44: netizencain: do the elementary schools have basements in OKC?

The news is saying basements in OK are rare because the ground is rock, which means you have to use dynomite to blast out a basement.

Funny. I am in the underground business and have dug holes 55 ft deep, 100 ft across.  I wonder how these work. ;)[i73.photobucket.com image 600x800]

Not sure if serious, considering your name, but it's not that simple, considering the geography. If basements were possible, don't you think we'd all have one? You think you're the first person to have this idea?


They're possible, you just have to be willing to build one. We carved a damn fortress into Cheyenne Mountain, for fark's sake.

They should be built into the price of a home. This thing where people get killed and they find the corpse 1/2 a mile away from the home because they didn't have anywhere to go is getting really old. Especially when it's a kid.
 
2013-05-20 05:53:22 PM

netizencain: How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?


Can't or won't dig a basement.
Bathrooms are tiny.
Hallway has less flying glass than the windowed classroom.
It's still stupid though.

/Elementary had large stone bathrooms that could fit the entire school.
//Middle school had bupkis.
///High school had basement for about 400 kids and the other 1100 just had to suffer (Personally, I'd run to the band hall and the internal soundproof, windowless stone/concrete band practice rooms).
////Michigan though, so it was less of a consideration.
 
2013-05-20 05:53:26 PM

ArtosRC: LasersHurt: You don't need to stop the whole thing, just disturb the bottom-most part to lower wind speeds.

You. Can't. The funnel is the focus of rotation of a ten-mile high wall of rotation. It is the single point of the fastest winds and rotation of the storm. The power involved cannot be prevented by engineering, but only endured. There is no way- and I cannot stress that enough -to slow it down, to nudge it, or to disrupt it. Few buildings can withstand a strong (EF3, some EF4) tornadoes, and incredibly few can withstand anything stronger; it is a matter of endurance. Tornadoes cannot be impacted by anything other than the ingredients in the atmosphere that create the storm to begin with. If anything, that's where you begin. But since large-scale projects (read: hurricane seeding) haven't yielded meaningful results, it's unlikely that would even help.

You cannot stop a tornado; you can only hope that it misses you. This is not faith in the mystic, but rather a statement of fact.


Well, said I've seen tornadoes drop on top of mountains and keep down the slopes to continue on.
 
2013-05-20 05:53:29 PM
Poor Horses
 
2013-05-20 05:53:37 PM

LasersHurt: Felgraf: LasersHurt: Can't we put up some kind of vertical structures to break up the ground speeds of tornados? I've seen all manner of things designed to break up waves, etc - surely a similar principle could be used to protect residential areas?

I think the kinetic energy just makes that impossible.

The idea I had was just to disturb the bottom layer of the wind, not stop or disrupt the entire storm.


They're all one and the same.  Tornadoes are a rotating cloud that is the natural result of intense atmospheric convection conditions within a storm.

The only way to disrupt a tornado is to disrupt the storm that forms it.
 
2013-05-20 05:53:44 PM

netizencain: How the fark is a 'hallway' a safe zone in a school in tornado alley?  Who the fark approves that?


I dunno, you got a better idea? You seem to be the expert.

You get to an interior room. A hallway is often in the interior of a building. Do you need me to explain it to you? Do you need my credentials as to how I know that?
 
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