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(KOCO Oklahoma City) NewsFlash Large tornado on ground right now -in- OKC   (koco.com) divider line 1221
    More: NewsFlash, Steve McClain, tornado warning, OKC, Oklahoma, tornadoes  
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15545 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 May 2013 at 4:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»


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2013-05-20 05:27:44 PM

Di Atribe: LasersHurt: Can't we put up some kind of vertical structures to break up the ground speeds of tornados? I've seen all manner of things designed to break up waves, etc - surely a similar principle could be used to protect residential areas?

Sure. A 1,000 foot building will really do some damage on a 50,000 foot storm. AND put more people in one concentrated area! Great idea.


Who said building, with people in it?
 
GBB
2013-05-20 05:27:52 PM
Anyone listenting to the scanner, Signal-7 is a "dead body" according to most codebooks.   And they are talking about them on OKC scanner.
 
2013-05-20 05:28:03 PM

ariseatex: PowerSlacker: ohdoublereally: Dear Mrs. ohdoublereally, here's another frigging reason I don't want to move from San Diego to Oklahoma.

Why would anyone want to do that...ever?

Jobs.  There's a lot of meteorology jobs, both governmental and private, centered around Norman (just a few miles to the south).  That's the only reason I'd ever move to Oklahoma, to work there.


Her folks still live in OK, and there's a cell bearing down on their area. (Ada).
 
2013-05-20 05:28:10 PM

Di Atribe: LasersHurt: Can't we put up some kind of vertical structures to break up the ground speeds of tornados? I've seen all manner of things designed to break up waves, etc - surely a similar principle could be used to protect residential areas?

Sure. A 1,000 foot building will really do some damage on a 50,000 foot storm. AND put more people in one concentrated area! Great idea.


I know you guys are going nuts on LasersHurt, but I do remember seeing the beginning of a Weather Channel documentary propose the idea.  I can't find any corroborating information on it, though.
 
2013-05-20 05:28:25 PM

zappaisfrank: Before watching the TV coverage of this, I had no idea there was a town in Oklahoma called "Liberal"...

[i5.photobucket.com image 515x455]


It doesn't.  That's Kansas.
 
2013-05-20 05:28:27 PM
They need some big ass skiploaders or something to clear paths for Emergency crews just to get through
 
2013-05-20 05:28:41 PM
Worst tornado damage in history of the world. If it weren't an Oklahoma City reporter saying it, I wouldn't give it much credence.

But it is.
 
2013-05-20 05:28:57 PM
Horse Stables blown to shreds. Poor horses. (and other animals)

:(
 
2013-05-20 05:28:58 PM

thismomentinblackhistory: Has anyone suggested building something to break-up the tornados?

Because I'm sure the government would like to hear more about that not at all bald faced farking retarded idea.


You could build a weather control network, but the farking Q would just bypass it anyway
 
2013-05-20 05:28:59 PM

zappaisfrank: Before watching the TV coverage of this, I had no idea there was a town in Oklahoma called "Liberal"...

[i5.photobucket.com image 515x455]


That's actually Liberal, Kansas.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:13 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: MartinaMcSorley: Di Atribe: MartinaMcSorley: wxboy: Tornado Emergency for Moore and southern OKC.

Is there something very specific about the Moore area that causes more tornado activity there than other places?  *Is* there, in fact, more activity there than other places?  It seems to happen around Moore so, so often.

Tinker AFB was once hit by tornadoes twice in one week.

I believe that was some sort of record for most frequent repeat tornadic touchdowns. Today may be breaking that record. Geez.

And to answer your question, there are lots of places in OK that are hit repeatedly. There are infamous tornadoes from Edmond, Moore, Tuttle, and OKC proper. There's a reason that the meteorology department at OU is world-renowned.

Yeah, it seems like the best meteorologists come from Oklahoma.  I guess I was just wondering if there is some sort of very local topography that makes some places more tornado-y than others.  Like, with earthquakes, places that are/were wetlands shake worse than places that are solid granite.  So, I was wondering if maybe hills or bodies of water could channel tornadoes into certain areas.  Honestly, though, from what I see of OKC, there isn't a hill in the whole state.  That place is flat, flat, flat!

It's the location. Big blob of cool air comes down from the north, smushes into a blob of moist, warm air from the Gulf. All along that line, you get storms and often tornadoes. That line just often happens to be in OK. I believe it also depends on the location of the jet stream.

I am not a meteorologist.

Watch out, Meeker. Apparently that's where it'shiatting next.


To answer the question:

I do have a meterologist degree.
 A ton of factors go into why tornadoes hit some areas more than others. You need warm moist air at the surface. usually a low level jet from the south, a warm dry air mass in the mid levels, and a upper air jet (where the plains fly.) Generally you also need shear: basically the top and bottom winds coming out of different directions and speeds.
Side note:: The dixie alley area tends to have stronger and more deadlier tornadoes than the tornado alley area believe it or not. Still tornado alley has the most amount, if your going for pure numbers.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:16 PM

LasersHurt: But this idea that tornados are unstoppable, forever, by anything, at all, is ridiculous and I won't have it.


That isn't what you originally asked. Currently we can't build a vertical structure to break up the ground speed of a tornado, because ... we can't.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:23 PM

Bontesla: Now That's What I Call a Taco!: The worst tornado damage in the history of the world, according to the KFOR reporter?!? 2 to 3 times larger area of devastation than May 3, 1999.

Dear God.

I feel like . . . that's a hard one to call. It just freaking happened. Doesn't seem particularly scientific?


I think his logic is that the May 3, 1999 tornado was the most expensive damage ever, and this one is twice or even three times the size. Your mileage for describing "worst" may vary.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:26 PM

ArtosRC: LasersHurt: Can't we put up some kind of vertical structures to break up the ground speeds of tornados? I've seen all manner of things designed to break up waves, etc - surely a similar principle could be used to protect residential areas?

Considering that the rotation extends upwards into the atmosphere for miles, no. Simply no way to apply such.


You only need to disturb the bottom of the rotation. A buffer layer of a few hundred to thousand feet would be enough to protect from the worst damage. It would still be a matter of enormous engineering, but I'm not suggesting stopping the entire tornado,  just breaking up the ground layer.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:32 PM

GBB: Anyone listenting to the scanner, Signal-7 is a "dead body" according to most codebooks.   And they are talking about them on OKC scanner.


Thank you. I heard "Signal-7" in conjunction with a downed building. No clue what that meant.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:34 PM
OKC Police scanner advising they need help with retrieving Signal Sevens: "Signal 7 -  DOA or dead body"
 
2013-05-20 05:29:42 PM

LasersHurt: Can't we put up some kind of vertical structures to break up the ground speeds of tornados? I've seen all manner of things designed to break up waves, etc - surely a similar principle could be used to protect residential areas?


I think the kinetic energy just makes that impossible.

Let's say a tornado is 1km wide, and 1km tall (this one may have been wider? But to simplify the math)

So that's a volume of .785 km^3, or 7.85*10^8 m^3. (note: This is a very rough estimate, and I realize I should TECHNICALLY do rotational kinetic energy, but this is easier and faster)

Assuming normal air density at 20*C and atmospheric pressure (1.2041 kg/m^3), that gives us a mass of 9.46*10^8 kg.

The tornado had a windspeed of 200mph (I think it may have gotten up to 225, someone said?). That's 89.4 meters/second.

Kinetic energy is .5*m*v^2

That gives us a kinetic energy of 3.78*10^12 joules, or 3.78 Terrajoules.

Little Boy released an energy of 67 TJ.

Basically: An *UNDERPOWERED* estimate gives this tornado 1/20th the energy of an atomic bomb.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:44 PM

star_topology: ontariolightning: Now That's What I Call a Taco!: The worst tornado damage in the history of the world, according to the KFOR reporter?!? 2 to 3 times larger area of devastation than May 3, 1999.

Dear God.

Worse than Bangladesh?

Who knows? What I do know is this: The world outside the US doesn't count.


I still think the Tri State tor would be considerably more destructive than this.
 
2013-05-20 05:29:51 PM
I assume the National Guard's been activated...not that they can get in to help if they're not in already.
 
2013-05-20 05:30:08 PM

awalkingecho: It seems that entire cities don't even slow them. What do you propose?


Actually, big cities kind of do slow down the smaller tornadoes, not big EF-4 or 5s.  Big cities make 'heat islands' that tend make tornadoes skid around to one side or the other.
 
2013-05-20 05:30:12 PM

PowerSlacker: zappaisfrank: Before watching the TV coverage of this, I had no idea there was a town in Oklahoma called "Liberal"...

[i5.photobucket.com image 515x455]

That's actually Liberal, Kansas.


Which is a pretty ironic name these days
 
2013-05-20 05:30:22 PM

awalkingecho: LasersHurt: jst3p: You have no idea how much power you are talking about.

Yes, I do.

You're talking about the rotating power of many, many nuclear blasts, strong enough to stick pieces of straw and hay 3 inches deep in solid, living trees.

There is no technology to break that up, that it would not simply go up and over and proceed along the way.


Even if you could break up the twister; a storm that bad could spawn a new one.

/ you'd have to break up the rotation in the whole storm somehow
 
2013-05-20 05:30:23 PM
2.25 MILES WIDE?? mother of...
 
2013-05-20 05:30:27 PM

JerseyTim: [pbs.twimg.com image 636x365]


That looks like Sim City after you use the "demolish" tool. :/
 
2013-05-20 05:30:30 PM
Has anyone heard from Omarion yet?
 
2013-05-20 05:30:37 PM

zappaisfrank: Before watching the TV coverage of this, I had no idea there was a town in Oklahoma called "Liberal"...

[i5.photobucket.com image 515x455]


Probably because it's in Kansas.
 
2013-05-20 05:30:43 PM

ontariolightning: If i live in OK I'ma have a basement pr I won't live there


The thing is, a lot of homes built right after the War in the Midwest often don't have basements. They don't have strong rooms, either. People have nowhere to go.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:03 PM
Goddamn it, neither CNN International or BBC has picked up the channel yet (connection too slow for the live feed).

I have to go to bed soon as it's getting near midnight here and I hate going to bed as tragedy unfolds back home in the USA...
 
2013-05-20 05:31:12 PM

jst3p: LasersHurt: But this idea that tornados are unstoppable, forever, by anything, at all, is ridiculous and I won't have it.

That isn't what you originally asked. Currently we can't build a vertical structure to break up the ground speed of a tornado, because ... we can't.


Well, that's a bit obvious. I guess I should have phrased it more to the effect of "is anyone currently researching the idea of breaking up the ground level winds of a tornado." I can't imagine it's TECHNICALLY impossible, just improbable or uneconomical.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:16 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: Another huge hook echo in the radar....this is not close to being over.


I didn't think it was, looking at the readings there was a lot of energy still left. this will go on well into the evening.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:28 PM
And the next one just dropped. Meeker, get the fark under cover!
 
2013-05-20 05:31:30 PM
 tornado almost on the ground at meeker
 
2013-05-20 05:31:30 PM

gameshowhost: 2.25 MILES WIDE?? mother of...


That's what I thought I heard.

Son of a biatch.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:32 PM

ohdoublereally: ariseatex: PowerSlacker: ohdoublereally: Dear Mrs. ohdoublereally, here's another frigging reason I don't want to move from San Diego to Oklahoma.

Why would anyone want to do that...ever?

Jobs.  There's a lot of meteorology jobs, both governmental and private, centered around Norman (just a few miles to the south).  That's the only reason I'd ever move to Oklahoma, to work there.

Her folks still live in OK, and there's a cell bearing down on their area. (Ada).


I'm in Ada - I hope we get skipped but we're due for a big one.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:35 PM
Tornado on the ground.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:43 PM
Anyone have an ETA on when the next wave is supposed to hit? I heard more severe weather on the way.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:48 PM

LasersHurt: I can't imagine that it wouldn't take some pretty ambitious engineering. But this idea that tornados are unstoppable, forever, by anything, at all, is ridiculous and I won't have it.


i get where you are coming from..i do.
however, the material sciences come into play.
Both the height needed and the mass required to deflected the energy rules all most all material.
after a certain height, even steel can not hold up it's own weight.
 
2013-05-20 05:31:54 PM

zappaisfrank: Before watching the TV coverage of this, I had no idea there was a town in Oklahoma called "Liberal"...


See that big black line? That's a state line. Liberal is in Kansas. It's a shiat hole
 
2013-05-20 05:32:16 PM

zappaisfrank: Before watching the TV coverage of this, I had no idea there was a town in Oklahoma called "Liberal"...

[i5.photobucket.com image 515x455]


I guess the Tea Party won?

/jk
//that is just friggen aweful
 
2013-05-20 05:32:18 PM
Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) voted against aid for Hurricane Sandy.  What do you bet he's ALL OVER aid for this?
 
2013-05-20 05:32:22 PM

Felgraf: LasersHurt: Can't we put up some kind of vertical structures to break up the ground speeds of tornados? I've seen all manner of things designed to break up waves, etc - surely a similar principle could be used to protect residential areas?

I think the kinetic energy just makes that impossible.


The idea I had was just to disturb the bottom layer of the wind, not stop or disrupt the entire storm.
 
2013-05-20 05:32:42 PM

soporific: Tornado on the ground.


Lookin like a fool with your tornado on the ground?
 
2013-05-20 05:33:05 PM
No calls or texts are going through, so I've stopped trying. Did get hold of my other sister (she lives a bit away from this area). Her electricity was out, but no damage.

If my other sister still has a house, it probably doesn't have electricity.

The footage of the damaged cars on the highway is troubling. Kinda looks like people got trapped in the path of the tornado as they sat on (I assume) I-35.
 
2013-05-20 05:33:18 PM
Get back in your cloud meeker tornado. We dont need more tornadoes today
 
2013-05-20 05:33:28 PM
"Multiple gas leaks" off of Western.
 
2013-05-20 05:33:32 PM
Good luck releasing information via the Internet now, school administration....
 
2013-05-20 05:33:32 PM
"[prayg]"????
 
2013-05-20 05:33:36 PM
My parents moved my family from Norman, OK to Minnesota when I was 5. We figured there wouldn't be any tornadoes and there would be more snow, which would be awesome! Turns out we were wrong on both counts considering that 15" of snow on May 2nd is NOT "awesome" and we still have to deal with these from time to time.

Still, I think MN is better than OK when it comes to tornado season; we have fewer of them and everyone up here has a basement.
On the other hand, MN has lutefisk, while the worst you can accuse OK of is a mild okra fixation. Maybe I should move back.
 
2013-05-20 05:33:48 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: It's the location. Big blob of cool air comes down from the north, smushes into a blob of moist, warm air from the Gulf. All along that line, you get storms and often tornadoes. That line just often happens to be in OK. I believe it also depends on the location of the jet stream.

I am not a meteorologist.

Watch out, Meeker. Apparently that's where it'shiatting next.


You may not be a meteorologist, but you've got a better handle on it than most people.

/smushes
//smuuuuuuuuuush
 
2013-05-20 05:34:04 PM

Mutable_Beaver: Headed right for Moore High School, and they can't evacuate.  Holy shiat!


If the tornado has already formed, evacuation from a building with sturdy interior hallways is usually the last thing you'd want to do.  Getting everybody away from the windows and into duck-and-cover position is about all there's time for, and it's worlds better than being outdoors.
 
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