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(BBC)   Begun the mega-ships sea trade battles have   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 3
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4571 clicks; posted to Business » on 20 May 2013 at 9:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-20 04:52:06 PM  
1 votes:

HotIgneous Intruder: I love those huge ships.
Someday I will own one.
And fill it with sex slaves.


If you shift "And" to line 2, you have a haiku.
2013-05-20 12:18:45 PM  
1 votes:

JasonOfOrillia: Wasn't there dramatic oversupply of shipping capacity 4 years ago?  And now Maersk is getting more ships?


It's the marine circle of life. A bigger, albeit slower, ship is more fuel efficient, as long as it has a terminus at either end big enough to load and off-load efficiently (as in "pull up the mile-long train beside the dock and crane RFID-equipped containers onto freight cars directly".

The result is that yesterday's 800-1000 footers are made redundant, and are cut to bits on Indian beaches to make tomorrow's Tatas.

/tatas.
2013-05-20 12:01:39 PM  
1 votes:

JasonOfOrillia: Wasn't there dramatic oversupply of shipping capacity 4 years ago?  And now Maersk is getting more ships?


In 2008 the bottom fell out of the shipping market, and a lot of ships got scrapped.  In 2011 Maresk made record profits as the ships rebounded.  Part of the change was a recovery in demand, but part of the change was also a move towards "slow steaming."  The "Triple E" class ships referenced in this article have a design speed of 16 knots, whereas the "E" class ships that were the previous size queens of the Maresk line were designed to cruse at 25 knows.

Slowing down dramatically reduces the cost of fuel per ton shipped, but also reduces the amount of trips a ship can make in a year creating an effective reduction in effective annual capacity.
 
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