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(News.com.au)   Couple flying to Dakar learn what it's like to be airline baggage   (news.com.au) divider line 41
    More: Fail, Dakar, Dark Knight Returns, flight number, Turkish Airlines, airlines, Senegal  
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8956 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 May 2013 at 10:05 AM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-20 10:09:17 AM
Such a Classic Fail! Also inability of airline ck-in staff to read.  But yay woot for airline returning them to Istanbul free, plus granting 2 free economy tix for future trip. Hope they need not use them to get to intended destination --
 
2013-05-20 10:12:59 AM
Dulles, Dallas nod in understanding.
 
2013-05-20 10:17:01 AM
It happened to me, I wanted to go to Constantinople and ended up in intanbul instead.
 
2013-05-20 10:18:25 AM

Bermuda59: It happened to me, I wanted to go to Constantinople and ended up in intanbul instead.


Maybe you'll like it better that way.
 
2013-05-20 10:19:24 AM

Bermuda59: It happened to me, I wanted to go to Constantinople and ended up in intanbul

Istanbul   instead.
 
2013-05-20 10:20:10 AM
I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.
 
2013-05-20 10:24:22 AM

kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.


I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?
 
2013-05-20 10:28:47 AM
I remember a story about a guy that thought he was getting on the plane from LA to Oakland and instead got on the plane to Auckland.
 
2013-05-20 10:29:51 AM

FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?


My flight was Pan Am.

This one was Air New Zealand a number of years later:

http://www.apnewsarchive.com/1985/Oakland-vs-Auckland-Confusion-Land s- Student-In-New-Zealand/id-920201fe8b75595d9653367946039dc4
 
2013-05-20 10:30:14 AM

FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?


It was before passports.
 
2013-05-20 10:35:52 AM
If you fly to smaller airports, always good to check destination carefully

Fayetteville, AK - Fayetteville, NC
 
2013-05-20 10:39:40 AM
"When the flight attendant said we were heading to Dhaka, we believed that this was how you pronounced 'Dakar' with a Turkish accent."

Damn, I better check my tickets.  I'm flying to Pune.
 
2013-05-20 10:45:05 AM

kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.


wasn't this the plot to an episode of Full House? Michelle met a girl while they were at the airport and joined her aboard the plane because 'oakland' was just across the bridge...

Omg that show was bad. We allllll watched it but man in retrospect it was such a pile of crap.

Anyways -- this happened to my dad... We were flying from calgary to dallas to belize. Exept continental had overbooked the flight (at christmas no less and they had overbooked haaaard) and they had 7 seats left. We were a party of 8. So after the airline guy gives the voucher deal to the young couple infront of us (they were concerned about getting their luggage off the plane and the guy assured them their bags would be with them) we step up to the counter -- and i hear the airline guy guffaw to a coworker that he just lost their bags....

blah blah blah continental sucks blah blah i get threatend with arrest in the airport blah blah my dad agrees to take the next flight. Because they assure him they will actually fly him right to his destination no connections or anything.

Well they flew him to San Pedro Honduras instead of San Pedro Belize. San Pedro belize is a beautiful town on an island and its very nice. San Pedro Honduras looks like a war zone and my dad said on the way to the hotel the airline put him into as an apology there were no less than 5 checkstops guarded by heavily armed men.

Honduras is not belize. Even when belize was the british honduras it would have been an epic farkup.

Continental -- they are all asswipes. I was threraten with arrest twice and i never even raised my voice. Complaining apparently is an arrestable offense.
 
2013-05-20 10:51:58 AM
This is why i refuse to fly, especially to europe.  I'd rather just take the extra time off and drive there.
 
2013-05-20 11:07:38 AM
So, they wound up with a pair of free tickets to anywhere?  Sounds like a Win to me!  If I was in their shoes I would find a hotel in Istanbul, have a nice Turkish vacation, and then take those two free tickets and go to Senegal some other time.  Or, if I was feeling thrifty, find out which place is the most expensive to fly to and go there instead!
 
2013-05-20 11:11:44 AM

jfivealive: This is why i refuse to fly, especially to europe.  I'd rather just take the extra time off and drive there.


Just caulk your wagon up and float it across.
 
2013-05-20 11:32:04 AM

MBooda: "When the flight attendant said we were heading to Dhaka, we believed that this was how you pronounced 'Dakar' with a Turkish accent."

Damn, I better check my tickets.  I'm flying to Pune.


Not exactly the same thing, but years ago I took a trip that involved flying to Newark, New Jersey, riding a bus to New York City, and then flying from New York City to Europe.  Every time I heard "Newark" I thought somebody was just slurring "New York."  It was only much later that I learned they were two different cities in different states.

In my defense, that "corridor" was so built-up even back think it's easy to think you're in a single city the entire time.
 
2013-05-20 11:35:24 AM
Dhaka just might be an upgrade from Dhakar
 
2013-05-20 11:46:18 AM
I know a guy who went to Seattle Washington, but wanted to go to Washington DC.
 
2013-05-20 11:47:35 AM

FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?


You don't need a passport to leave the US. You do when you land whenever you go, but yoi don't when you leave.

Which I find very very odd, I've flown around a lot, in Europe you get an entry and exit stamp, in Canada too, Mexico, Argentina, Taiwan, Egypt, etc... But not the US, If you're a Tourist you get a I-94 ticket on your way in (and a stamp) that you then turn in to the airline on your way out, but no official departure stamp from CBP
 
2013-05-20 11:51:32 AM

ciberido: Not exactly the same thing, but years ago I took a trip that involved flying to Newark, New Jersey, riding a bus to New York City, and then flying from New York City to Europe.  Every time I heard "Newark" I thought somebody was just slurring "New York."  It was only much later that I learned they were two different cities in different states.


To be fair if you search for NY flights it always includes Newark. And most of the time it's easier to get to into Newark than JFK or LaGuardia.
 
2013-05-20 11:55:37 AM
I flew from Dulles to Johannesberg a few years back on a South African Airways A340-300. It had a fuel stop in Dakar, Senegal on both the outbound and return flight. I can categorically state that wherever the airline sent them was a big step up from flying them to Dakar.

Apart from the insane heat even at 4am, the Escalade-sized mosquitos that invaded the plane, the bitter and awful bug spray they use in the cabin before closing the doors and all the densely-packed squalor beyond the airport perimeter, we did get to see that crazy, huge statue the North Koreans built there.
 
2013-05-20 12:18:54 PM

maq0r: FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?

You don't need a passport to leave the US. You do when you land whenever you go, but yoi don't when you leave.

Which I find very very odd, I've flown around a lot, in Europe you get an entry and exit stamp, in Canada too, Mexico, Argentina, Taiwan, Egypt, etc... But not the US, If you're a Tourist you get a I-94 ticket on your way in (and a stamp) that you then turn in to the airline on your way out, but no official departure stamp from CBP


But the airline checkin counter asks to see your passport.  I know plenty of people who were refused boarding tickets to international flights because they forget passports or they had expired.
 
2013-05-20 12:19:20 PM

FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?


Have you never flown internationally from the US?  There's no outbound immigration check.  The airline will check your passport (if you're inadmissible at your destination and they should have known it's a big fine), that's it.

Thus you have a passenger who is heading for Oakland.  They hear a call for a plane to Aukland and think it's theirs.  Back in the days before boarding passes were scanned it would be easy for the gate agent to not notice the wrong pass.  If the seat happened to be open it wouldn't be noticed on the flight, either.

Even these days you once in a while encounter a passenger on a wrong plane.  Even experienced fliers can occasionally be tripped up.
 
2013-05-20 12:22:46 PM
 "When the flight attendant said we were heading to Dhaka, we believed that this was how you pronounced 'Dakar' with a Turkish accent."

Hopefully they did not say it with a German accent

www.cityscouter.com
 
2013-05-20 12:54:57 PM

FrancoFile: maq0r: FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?

You don't need a passport to leave the US. You do when you land whenever you go, but yoi don't when you leave.

Which I find very very odd, I've flown around a lot, in Europe you get an entry and exit stamp, in Canada too, Mexico, Argentina, Taiwan, Egypt, etc... But not the US, If you're a Tourist you get a I-94 ticket on your way in (and a stamp) that you then turn in to the airline on your way out, but no official departure stamp from CBP

But the airline checkin counter asks to see your passport.  I know plenty of people who were refused boarding tickets to international flights because they forget passports or they had expired.


It depends; for example, if you're a citizen and you check-in online, you can print your boarding pass and just go to the gate, also, some people use their passports as a form of ID while traveling within the US so it would also mean nothing (yes, there are people who don't drive nor get drivers licenses).
 
2013-05-20 12:58:28 PM

JohnCarter: If you fly to smaller airports, always good to check destination carefully

Fayetteville, AK - Fayetteville, NC


If you're looking for Fayetteville, AK... you will not be happy when you get off the plane in Fayetteville, NC of all places.
 
2013-05-20 01:22:01 PM

Robo Beat: jfivealive: This is why i refuse to fly, especially to europe.  I'd rather just take the extra time off and drive there.

Just caulk your wagon up and float it across.


www.prbuzz.com
 
2013-05-20 01:32:43 PM

Robo Beat: jfivealive: This is why i refuse to fly, especially to europe.  I'd rather just take the extra time off and drive there.

Just caulk your wagon up and float it across.


Inefficient.  No need to get anything wet.  Take the zero-friction gravity tunnel.  There in 42 minutes.

www.thebigquestions.com
 
2013-05-20 01:42:11 PM
DAKAAAAAH.
 
2013-05-20 01:42:46 PM

boarch: If you're looking for Fayetteville, AK... you will not be happy when you get off the plane in Fayetteville, NC of all places.


It may be a blessing in disguise to end up in North Carolina instead of Arkansas. Unless, of course, you were going to do business with Wal-Mart.

/btw, Arkansas is AR
//there is no Fayetteville in Alaska
 
2013-05-20 01:48:48 PM

boarch: JohnCarter: If you fly to smaller airports, always good to check destination carefully

Fayetteville, AK - Fayetteville, NC

If you're looking for Fayetteville, AK... you will not be happy when you get off the plane in Fayetteville, NC of all places.


I doubt anyone could be happy getting off a plane in any Fayetteville!
 
2013-05-20 02:21:34 PM

MBooda: "When the flight attendant said we were heading to Dhaka, we believed that this was how you pronounced 'Dakar' with a Turkish accent."

Damn, I better check my tickets.  I'm flying to Pune.


What a dirty city that is.
 
2013-05-20 02:26:04 PM
Yea, if you end up on the wrong flight it's your own fault.  People are astonishingly stupid sometimes.
 
2013-05-20 02:33:35 PM
I know that the airlines check your passports before you leave the US.
If they fly you somewhere and you are denied entrance its their job to get you back to the US, or so I have heard.
Before I was allowed to go to India they checked my passport for my Indian Visa.
I really don't get how the passengers let this happen.
I check my flights and verify its all correct, down to my seat. Been screwed over more than once.
This is a case of a customer being too passive IMO.
 
2013-05-20 03:28:11 PM

lemortede: I know that the airlines check your passports before you leave the US.
If they fly you somewhere and you are denied entrance its their job to get you back to the US, or so I have heard.
Before I was allowed to go to India they checked my passport for my Indian Visa.
I really don't get how the passengers let this happen.
I check my flights and verify its all correct, down to my seat. Been screwed over more than once.
This is a case of a customer being too passive IMO.


It depends, if they can assert you're a citizen they already know you don't need visas to go somewhere; for example, I went to Canada from the US in february, the person I was flying with is a citizen (I'm not) during online check in, the system asked this question and he checked "yes". He printed out the boarding pass and proceeded to the gate, no check done. Where as, I had to had my visa checked for a boarding pass to be printed.

Also, like I mentioned, a LOT of people use passports as a valid form of ID when traveling INSIDE the US. Not everybody has a driver license, so for example, a visually impaired person would use a passport instead of a drivers license as a form of ID to travel, going just fine through all the checks.
 
2013-05-20 03:37:03 PM

Loren: FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?

Have you never flown internationally from the US?  There's no outbound immigration check.  The airline will check your passport (if you're inadmissible at your destination and they should have known it's a big fine), that's it.

Thus you have a passenger who is heading for Oakland.  They hear a call for a plane to Aukland and think it's theirs.  Back in the days before boarding passes were scanned it would be easy for the gate agent to not notice the wrong pass.  If the seat happened to be open it wouldn't be noticed on the flight, either.

Even these days you once in a while encounter a passenger on a wrong plane.  Even experienced fliers can occasionally be tripped up.


I've flown internationally at least 150 times in the last 20 years.  If you're a transferring passenger, still in the international no-mans-land, then this kind of screwup can happen.  If you're starting at a US airport and going international, the checkin desk is going to look at your passport.  I've stood at or near the desk a half-dozen times while colleagues and random strangers were turned away because of passport issues.  Some random American intending on taking a shuttle flight from LA to Oakland is not going to have her passport on her.
 
2013-05-20 04:06:52 PM

FrancoFile: Loren: FrancoFile: kpaxoid: I was on a flight from LAX to Auckland, NZ once.  A large elderly woman became concerned about two hours into the flight.  She wanted to know why it was taking so long to get to Oakland.

This was before the TSA as we now know it.

I call bullshiat.  She had her passport with her?

Have you never flown internationally from the US?  There's no outbound immigration check.  The airline will check your passport (if you're inadmissible at your destination and they should have known it's a big fine), that's it.

Thus you have a passenger who is heading for Oakland.  They hear a call for a plane to Aukland and think it's theirs.  Back in the days before boarding passes were scanned it would be easy for the gate agent to not notice the wrong pass.  If the seat happened to be open it wouldn't be noticed on the flight, either.

Even these days you once in a while encounter a passenger on a wrong plane.  Even experienced fliers can occasionally be tripped up.

I've flown internationally at least 150 times in the last 20 years.  If you're a transferring passenger, still in the international no-mans-land, then this kind of screwup can happen.  If you're starting at a US airport and going international, the checkin desk is going to look at your passport.  I've stood at or near the desk a half-dozen times while colleagues and random strangers were turned away because of passport issues.  Some random American intending on taking a shuttle flight from LA to Oakland is not going to have her passport on her.


This is not applicable if the person uses their passport as a form of ID for air travel (including within the US) which is VERY common. I know someone at work who had their license suspended and uses his passport when he needs to travel nationally.
 
2013-05-20 08:00:33 PM

FrancoFile: I've flown internationally at least 150 times in the last 20 years. If you're a transferring passenger, still in the international no-mans-land, then this kind of screwup can happen. If you're starting at a US airport and going international, the checkin desk is going to look at your passport. I've stood at or near the desk a half-dozen times while colleagues and random strangers were turned away because of passport issues. Some random American intending on taking a shuttle flight from LA to Oakland is not going to have her passport on her.


You misunderstand.  I'm saying she checked in for a domestic flight and accidentally boarded an international one.  If the wrong boarding pass isn't caught at the gate or on the plane this could happen.

maq0r: This is not applicable if the person uses their passport as a form of ID for air travel (including within the US) which is VERY common. I know someone at work who had their license suspended and uses his passport when he needs to travel nationally.


And when we travel internationally we use our passports even for the domestic leg.
 
2013-05-20 09:36:32 PM
Yeah, is not uncommon for people in cities like New York, Boston, Washington and even San Francisco (this would include this woman)  to not have a driver's license and use a passport as form of ID when traveling.
 
2013-05-21 01:25:27 AM
There is only one way to get to Dakar.

media.icmn.cz
 
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