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(NW Florida Daily News)   While Congress goes back and forth over how to solve the nation's financial problems, four specialized mechanics in Florida are quietly saving the Air Force millions each year   (nwfdailynews.com) divider line 53
    More: Spiffy, air forces, Air Force millions, air conditioning units, replacement costs  
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13053 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 May 2013 at 9:41 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-21 09:06:12 AM  

dv-ous: So... what you're saying is that the "throw it out and start over" mentality that saves time and money in the consumer electronics space, in fact  doesn't apply to highly durable, custom made or limited-production run military hardware?

Ehrmagerd!


Medical equipment is also mostly "throw it out and start over". A piece of equipment I've worked on had a plug-in motor drive IC go bad, that if the IC had been available would have cost maybe $10. Instead, a $2000 board had to be replaced. Your health care costs in a nutshell.
 
2013-05-21 09:17:40 AM  

WordyGrrl: humanshrapnel: I'm ok with this as long as they're not working on flight critical hardware.

/dnrtfa

Avionics stuff has to go through a lot of testing, especially repaired or re-worked parts, before it gets slapped on a plane. Traceability's also a big thing, and if there's an investigation, they can almost go back to where the metal for the little wavy washer on Post 3 of 4 was mined.

/Used to make fans for avionics cooling systems.
//But I can't fix my own $20 Wal-Mart standing fan because it's designed specifically to NOT to be take-apart-able or repairable.


My kitchen vent fan is over 50 years old. When I bought the house 24 years ago, it was just sitting there humming when you turned it on. I took it out, disassembled it, cleaned and relubed it. It's been working perfectly and quietly ever since.
 
2013-05-21 06:50:11 PM  

MarkEC: My kitchen vent fan is over 50 years old. When I bought the house 24 years ago, it was just sitting there humming when you turned it on. I took it out, disassembled it, cleaned and relubed it. It's been working perfectly and quietly ever since.


Ain't it a damn shame that we don't build 'em like we used to? Guess it's just too profitable to make disposable stuff than it is to make a durable item that you'd recommend to all your friends.
 
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