Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Buzzfeed)   Chicken and ale theft. It's your Mugshot Roundup in the 1870s   (buzzfeed.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, mug shots  
•       •       •

9701 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 May 2013 at 1:35 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



86 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2013-05-20 04:44:35 AM  

suthrnrunt: bearded clamorer: [s3-ec.buzzfed.com image 442x628]

I know a narcoleptic cab driver that looks just like this guy

oh lord.... a narcoleptic cab driver.... how many time has he fallen asleep at the wheel?!


At least once.
Was in his cab with comedian Robert Schimmel in 2009 when the guy nodded off.
He blew through a red light and crossed 5 lanes of traffic before all the screaming woke him up.

/Good times
 
2013-05-20 05:11:26 AM  
There's also plenty of other interesting material on the Tyne & Wear Archives and Museum Flickr page linked at the beginning of the Buzzfeed article. The article only shows a small portion of the entries from the Criminals of 1871-1873 set. These are also worth a view:

Newcastle upon Tyne criminals of the 1930s
Alternative Modelling in the 1940's (not explicit, but possibly NSFW if your workplace is really prudish)
Fairground scenes
The Hoppings
Newcastle in the 1800's
Playing Tricks
 
2013-05-20 05:13:08 AM  

phalamir: Khazar-Khum: Considering the value of fabric at the time, plus the costs involved in making clothing/bedding/shoes, they were costing their victims serious money.

Not really.  Clothes weren't Walmart cheap, but neither were they luxury good either.  Cloth production was the engine that drove the Industrial Revolution, and by the 1870s, they were churning the stuff out pretty steadily.  For example, English cotton goods production was so large - and so cheap - that Bengal's native cloth industry totally collapsed, even as it was producing cotton for England.  It was cheaper to transport the cotton to England, turn it into clothes, and then transport those clothes back to Bengal, rather than trundle the cotton down the road.  And the British were systematically tax-raping the Bengali population at the same time, so these are not people awash in cash who are buying these clothes.

Sentencing was most likely fueled by "the lesser orders must be punish'ed for their crimes because they are of inferior stock, and only a sound thrashing can inform their weak minds, constitutions, and moral fiber"


That's only true for people higher up the social ladder than lower middle class.  If you were, say, the cobbler's wife, you could order a  pattern from a ladies' magazine and maybe even make it up on your sewing machine, if you were able to afford one. Or you could go to the Mercantile and order a dress, and when it arrived you had the local dressmaker alter it to fit you.  If you were a servant girl or a stablehand, you weren't going to be paid anywhere well enough to get new clothes any time you felt like it. There's a reason a 'new suit of clothes' was part of the contracts at the time. Even slaves had to be given new suits of clothes.

For centuries bed and table linens were  included in all household inventories. Castles, manor houses, palaces--all of them counted the house's 'linens' as major possessions.
 
2013-05-20 05:21:40 AM  

adamatari: I'm not sure whether these sentences are harsher or less harsh than today. Everybody goes to prison or gets hard labor, sure, but mostly it's over and done with pretty quickly. 14 days, 2 months, etc. Now they would probably all get a year of probation and a nasty fine. I think 14 days or a month is better than a long probation.

I'd have to know more details, but it certainly seems (mostly) very fair, more so than today.


Yeah prior to the war on drugs© and the for profit prisons ™ felonies where only stuff like rape, murder, arson, armed robbery, and rape.
 
2013-05-20 06:18:19 AM  

Oldiron_79: Yeah prior to the war on drugs© and the for profit prisons ™ felonies where only stuff like rape, murder, arson, armed robbery, and rape.


I'm only going off California laws, but only two of these appeared to have been convicted of felonies under our current system. Of course, I'm assuming the cash value of what was stolen in these incidents was less than $950 in 2013 dollars.

And for the record, Grand Theft has been a felony for a long, long time.

Very interesting article, though.
 
2013-05-20 06:49:57 AM  

Oldiron_79: felonies where only stuff like rape, murder, arson, armed robbery, and rape.


What about stampeding cattle through the Vatican?
 
2013-05-20 06:50:00 AM  
 "Nineteen-year-old David Barron was a cabinetmaker who was convicted and sentenced to six months' imprisonment for stealing champagne"

Don't steal from the rich!
 
2013-05-20 06:50:43 AM  

RobSeace: Oldiron_79: felonies where only stuff like rape, murder, arson, armed robbery, and rape.

What about stampeding cattle through the Vatican?


Kinky
 
2013-05-20 06:51:22 AM  

Basily Gourt:  "Nineteen-year-old David Barron was a cabinetmaker who was convicted and sentenced to six months' imprisonment for stealing champagne"

Don't steal from the rich!


The more things change the more they stay the same.
 
2013-05-20 07:13:09 AM  
Not a single drug bust. See how that works?
 
2013-05-20 07:17:33 AM  
None of you seem to remember that William Bell lived into this century and played Spock in J J Abrams' "Fringe"
 
2013-05-20 07:26:15 AM  
Stolen chicken and ale?

I thought this was a thread about the weekend arrest of a tea bag party gathering.

I was hoping to open the article and find out that the chicken was rescued before the overindulgence of stolen ale cause the participants to ravage said poultry.

Surprised that it was actually historical and informative and no chickens were harm (in a perverted way)
 
2013-05-20 07:57:31 AM  
s3-ec.buzzfed.com

This is but a minor setback. Whilst in prison, I shall use my time constructively. I shall complete my plans for a steam powered arachnid perhaps five stories tall and I shall use this infernal device to hold ransom the intercontinental railroad. A kingly ransom of five million dollars should set me well. I shall then relocate to the sandwich islands where I can impress the locals as a willing army devoted to my cause. Yes. I think that introducing them to the wonder drug cocaine should be advantageous to me. With the islands, firmly in my grip, I shall set up a coaling station. Lure the navies of the Pacific in to using my facilities and when the time is right, replace some of their coal with deadly explosives. Once at sea, their vessels shall be rendered from within with a great loss of life. My sea and land going arachnids piloted by my cocaine fueled soldiers shall rule the greatest ocean of the world. I shall lay waste to the great cities of the coast and all shall tremble before my might. Yes. Then mommy will like me better than daddy.
 
2013-05-20 08:24:57 AM  

Khazar-Khum: HotWingAgenda: Awful lot of people stealing clothes and bedsheets back then.  Looking at what they were wearing, I'm not surprised.

And yet, none were caught stealing soap.

They were probably stolen from either their employers, or their neighbors.  The girls are the right age to be employed as housekeepers for families of slightly better means, while the boys are about the right age to be employed as grooms, stablehands, and basic cleaners for a tradesman or shopkeeper.  Considering the value of fabric at the time, plus the costs involved in making clothing/bedding/shoes, they were costing their victims serious money. It's not like they swiped a T-shirt from Wal-mart.


===============

Yup.  Before the days of synthetics, modern looms, sewing machines, etc, clothing/footwear was very expensive.  When clothes became too worn wear,  the items were collected by "rag pickers" who recycled the stuff.
 
2013-05-20 08:27:02 AM  
s3-ec.buzzfed.com

In 1873, Robert Hardy was sentenced to four months for stealing ale. Upon leaving jail, Robert entered a treatment program from Ale Addiction. He completed the program and announced his sobriety to the evening papers. Many people wished him well and hoped that this new fangled 'treatment program' could have effect on the nation's ale addicts.

Robert got a job in a hemp rope factory. It wasn't glamorous work but it paid his bills. One year in to his sobriety, the newspapers ran an update on him. The reporter even tried to tempt him with a bottle of the finest ale but Robert bravely turned it down. His story and photo caught the eye of a young singer in the local opera company and they met. Their whirlwind romance made the front pages of the tabloids but they seemed happy and committed to each other. In spite of the opera singer's wealth, Robert refused to give up his job at the hemp factory.

On the anniversary of his three year sobriety, Robert announced that he and his beloved opera singer would become husband and wife. Their wedding was held at the grand cathedral and attended by everyone including railroad men. A white carriage with four white stallions and four of the darkest footmen whisked them away on their honeymoon.

It was scarcely six months later when the opera star announced she was leaving the stage. She said that her husband would be managing her career and that she would be touring the saloons of the great cities. Her voice would no longer sing opera but rather the music of the people. Robert said that he could continue to work at the hemp factory and manage her career. This, in spite the fact that he was now spending some 20 hours a day making rope.

The singer's debut at the finest saloon in town was attended by all members of the press. Their reports agreed upon the fact that the opera singer was far out of her league singing these plain and ordinary songs. Also, they reported that she dressed as a common harlot and that he ankles were visible for some of her performance causing women to faint and men to grow lecherous. Between the songs, she soapboxed about the evils of liquor, especially ale. This final act of folly enraged the saloon keepers. She was not invited back to finish her contract and the other saloons cancelled without payment.

Robert was enraged. He sued the saloons. He sued the lawyers who wrote the contracts. He even tried to sue the newspapers who reported these events. He and the former opera singer retreated to their mansion where Robert had mysterious laid up a great quantity of rope. Friends were turned away at the gate and the press was especially chased from the lands.

After a few months of this, Robert appeared alone from within the walls of the mansion. He announced that the opera singer was no more. That she had become deceased from consumption and he blamed the world for his loss. He also commissioned a photographer to enter the mansion and photograph the deceased. These photos he sold to the highest bidder.

Robert announced that he was going to write the greatest love song and dedicate it to his deceased. He also stunned the world by saying that he would sing it for his voice was as good if not better than his deceased wife's. But first, he needed to get back to the roots of his life. He went back to work at the hemp rope factory.

Though he claimed that his song was nearly complete, he never got the chance to sing it for his beloved. Just ten years after the death of his wife, the rope factory caught fire. Though there was ample time for egress, Robert stayed behind ensuring that all were safely away. He reportedly fought off efforts to extract him and died in the conflagration.

Officials who entered his mansion found the place destroyed from with in. All the art work was gone and there was no record of the music that he said he was writing. Officials assumed it burned up in the hemp rope factory. All that was discovered in the mansion was mattress afoul with the stains of a depraved man, photo magazines and a strange food item that appeared to be toasted tortillas broken in to triangles and dusted with distinct spices.
 
2013-05-20 08:30:38 AM  
s3-ec.buzzfed.com

Thirteen-year-old James Scullion was sentenced to 14 days' hard labor for stealing clothes. After this he was sent to Market Weighton Reformatory School for three years.

Upon development of this photograph, it was determined that James' pants were unbuttoned and his three years sentence at the reformatory was commuted to death.
 
2013-05-20 08:32:36 AM  

People_are_Idiots: I know I hate to be the one to point this out... don't they seem a bit... white?


============

They're mostly Irish.   Everyone knows the Irish ain't white.  Born troublemakers, everyone.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-20 08:39:35 AM  

phalamir: Khazar-Khum: Considering the value of fabric at the time, plus the costs involved in making clothing/bedding/shoes, they were costing their victims serious money.

Not really.  Clothes weren't Walmart cheap, but neither were they luxury good either.  Cloth production was the engine that drove the Industrial Revolution, and by the 1870s, they were churning the stuff out pretty steadily.  For example, English cotton goods production was so large - and so cheap - that Bengal's native cloth industry totally collapsed, even as it was producing cotton for England.  It was cheaper to transport the cotton to England, turn it into clothes, and then transport those clothes back to Bengal, rather than trundle the cotton down the road.  And the British were systematically tax-raping the Bengali population at the same time, so these are not people awash in cash who are buying these clothes.

Sentencing was most likely fueled by "the lesser orders must be punish'ed for their crimes because they are of inferior stock, and only a sound thrashing can inform their weak minds, constitutions, and moral fiber"


Take another look at these photos. In most of them the clothes they are wearing would be described as threadbare. The reason for that is because they could not afford nice clothes.
 
2013-05-20 08:42:08 AM  

s3-ec.buzzfed.com
wait..wot?

 
2013-05-20 08:43:02 AM  
s3-ec.buzzfed.com

Why is it that you do not love me? Is it because of my age? Many twelve year old girls are still of the marriageable stock. I can take your rages and your blows like a ten year old.

I follow you about the streets because I care for you. I stand outside your window so that I can but catch a glimpse of you before you retire for the night. I send you telegraphs in the hopes that you will tell the agent to reply in kind. A simple "I am well. Stop" from you would set my heart aflutter.

Perhaps there is another. The girl who cleans your chamber pot, perhaps? What does she have that I don't. Do you know that she discharges your waste in the fields behind your house yet tells you she disposes of it according to local laws? She is but a liar and a thief and should be sent from you post-haste!

None shall come between you and I, my betrothed. I shall have you or I shall perish in the fires that shall consume us both! It is not a threat. It is a promise that our love shall rise from the flames like the very Phoenix. Entwined forever and a day.

But I promise you this: Accept my love and we shall live in accord forever. I shall prepare your meals and tend to your clothes and make sure that you live your life as a proper gentleman. You may beat me with your cane and I shall not raise my hand in defense for I know you do this for a reason that is all your own. My life is yours.

Now go and contemplate upon what I've said here. Your heart shall make the right decision for I know it to be true. Also, note that I have sewn my name in to all of your clothing so that you will always know who I am.
 
2013-05-20 08:58:58 AM  

doglover: Nice sentences. It would be nice for America to learn some leniency like that.


Leniency?  You do know a month in a 19th century jail is not like a month in 21st century jail, right?  Those were the days of bread and water would be your meals, no running water for inmates and guards did not get in trouble for prisoner abuse.  They held strongly to the 'harsh punishment will mean they won't do it again' rehabilitation program.

Besides the difference between sentencings has to do with being polite while before the judge, even today.  Only it does help to have a well paid lawyer to do your politeness.
 
2013-05-20 09:02:47 AM  

lack of warmth: Leniency? You do know a month in a 19th century jail is not like a month in 21st century jail, right? Those were the days of bread and water would be your meals, no running water for inmates and guards did not get in trouble for prisoner abuse. They held strongly to the 'harsh punishment will mean they won't do it again' rehabilitation program.


That was more closer to the style of prisons of the Quakers, which meant 24 hour solitary confinement with zero time outside your cell, zero human contact as well. They had special ways to give you the food so even guards couldn't interact with you.

Penance style punishment, which is why we get the word penitentiary when referring to prisons.
 
2013-05-20 09:07:59 AM  
HotWingAgenda
Awful lot of people stealing clothes and bedsheets back then. Looking at what they were wearing, I'm not surprised.

And yet, none were caught stealing soap.


Also opportunity I guess - people didn't hang soap out to dry.
 
2013-05-20 09:08:17 AM  
Quite a few Roberts and Williams.
 
2013-05-20 09:13:28 AM  

squibbits: Not a single drug bust. See how that works?


Umm, what about the tobacco and ale?  I have heard a lot of arguments about the harming effects of tobacco and alcohol compared to marijuana, so it maybe a long shot but if things went differently we would see those two offenses as the 19th century version of drug related busts of the time.  I know some folks back then did view tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and opium use as all being equally harmful.

So, it could be said that stealing substances for the sake of indulging vices would be the same as a drug crime.  It was seen that way back then, the view changed only because the courts outlawed some and not others.  Some folks see vices as vices regardless of what the courts say.
 
2013-05-20 09:45:13 AM  

Harry Freakstorm: [s3-ec.buzzfed.com image 456x632]

This is but a minor setback. Whilst in prison, I shall use my time constructively. I shall complete my plans for a steam powered arachnid perhaps five stories tall and I shall use this infernal device to hold ransom the intercontinental railroad. A kingly ransom of five million dollars should set me well. I shall then relocate to the sandwich islands where I can impress the locals as a willing army devoted to my cause. Yes. I think that introducing them to the wonder drug cocaine should be advantageous to me. With the islands, firmly in my grip, I shall set up a coaling station. Lure the navies of the Pacific in to using my facilities and when the time is right, replace some of their coal with deadly explosives. Once at sea, their vessels shall be rendered from within with a great loss of life. My sea and land going arachnids piloted by my cocaine fueled soldiers shall rule the greatest ocean of the world. I shall lay waste to the great cities of the coast and all shall tremble before my might. Yes. Then mommy will like me better than daddy.



So, you watched Wild Wild West this weekend, too?

Wonderfully written as always.
 
2013-05-20 09:48:00 AM  
#4 is a spittin image of a young Brian Peppers.
 
2013-05-20 10:22:40 AM  
What ever happened to Steak and Ale, I wonder?
 
2013-05-20 10:54:42 AM  

Harry Freakstorm: [s3-ec.buzzfed.com image 456x632]

This is but a minor setback. Whilst in prison, I shall use my time constructively. I shall complete my plans for a steam powered arachnid perhaps five stories tall and I shall use this infernal device to hold ransom the intercontinental railroad. A kingly ransom of five million dollars should set me well. I shall then relocate to the sandwich islands where I can impress the locals as a willing army devoted to my cause. Yes. I think that introducing them to the wonder drug cocaine should be advantageous to me. With the islands, firmly in my grip, I shall set up a coaling station. Lure the navies of the Pacific in to using my facilities and when the time is right, replace some of their coal with deadly explosives. Once at sea, their vessels shall be rendered from within with a great loss of life. My sea and land going arachnids piloted by my cocaine fueled soldiers shall rule the greatest ocean of the world. I shall lay waste to the great cities of the coast and all shall tremble before my might. Yes. Then mommy will like me better than daddy.


Did anyone else read this in Stewie Griffin's voice?
 
2013-05-20 11:09:31 AM  

IdBeCrazyIf: lack of warmth: Leniency? You do know a month in a 19th century jail is not like a month in 21st century jail, right? Those were the days of bread and water would be your meals, no running water for inmates and guards did not get in trouble for prisoner abuse. They held strongly to the 'harsh punishment will mean they won't do it again' rehabilitation program.

That was more closer to the style of prisons of the Quakers, which meant 24 hour solitary confinement with zero time outside your cell, zero human contact as well. They had special ways to give you the food so even guards couldn't interact with you.

Penance style punishment, which is why we get the word penitentiary when referring to prisons.


Butt how was the sex?
 
2013-05-20 12:58:06 PM  

Harry Freakstorm: much wonderful nonsense


Bravo, bravo! Encore!
 
2013-05-20 12:58:28 PM  

miss diminutive: Four months for stealing ale? How long does he get for sacking Winterfell?


VERY nice.
 
2013-05-20 01:45:03 PM  
Whole lot of failed history majors in this thrad, lol
 
2013-05-20 02:07:10 PM  
Those kids had some really crappy lawyers.
 
2013-05-20 06:46:37 PM  

Fissile: When clothes became too worn wear, the items were collected by "rag pickers"


Which these days are known as Tweakers.
 
2013-05-20 07:32:49 PM  
Which one of these cawksarkers stole the dope, Wu?
 
Displayed 36 of 86 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report