If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Inland Valley Daily Bulletin)   Defense lawyers argue with Court over sentencing rapist cop who committed suicide in jail: "I can't comprehend how you can go ahead and sentence someone who is dead"   (dailybulletin.com) divider line 122
    More: Strange, defense lawyers, Anthony Orban, rapists, superior courts, jail  
•       •       •

9529 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 May 2013 at 7:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



122 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-19 05:10:23 PM
Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?
 
2013-05-19 05:16:08 PM
This just in! Legal systems are not mechanisms of justice or bastions of reason.

News at 11.
 
2013-05-19 05:23:10 PM
There is no precedent for this?
 
2013-05-19 05:24:11 PM
If he's dead, what the fark difference does it make whether or not he's sentenced?
 
2013-05-19 05:28:52 PM
I think he should get the death penalty. Might as well make the punishment fit the outcome.
 
2013-05-19 05:32:33 PM
Just sentence him to time served.
 
2013-05-19 06:08:09 PM

VelcroFez: Just sentence him to time served.


Awesome.
 
2013-05-19 06:26:03 PM
Isn't that the Ken Lay defense?
 
2013-05-19 06:39:03 PM

Barfmaker: VelcroFez: Just sentence him to time served.

Awesome.


Aaaaand, the eh, the eh, that's all, folks!
 
2013-05-19 06:45:23 PM

NutWrench: Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?


I suppose it all depends on the terms of his police union pension, doesn't it?
 
2013-05-19 06:48:35 PM

Marcus Aurelius: NutWrench: Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?

I suppose it all depends on the terms of his police union pension, doesn't it?


I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

Still, it would be a dick move to try to rob his beneficiaries of any benefits just because this guy was an asshole.
 
2013-05-19 07:00:19 PM
By the time he's sentenced, he won't be appealing.
 
2013-05-19 07:13:50 PM

Relatively Obscure: If he's dead, what the fark difference does it make whether or not he's sentenced?


If she's dead, what the fark difference does it make if I stick my dick in her?

/or is this a bad analogy?
 
2013-05-19 07:16:45 PM

WhippingBoy: Relatively Obscure: If he's dead, what the fark difference does it make whether or not he's sentenced?

If she's dead, what the fark difference does it make if I stick my dick in her?

/or is this a bad analogy?


So, this turned into a snuff film thread?
 
2013-05-19 07:18:31 PM

jehovahs witness protection: By the time he's sentenced, he won't be appealing.


I'd wager he's pretty damned unappealing already.
 
2013-05-19 07:19:01 PM
So, does this mean that Lee Harvey Oswald DIDN'T shoot Kennedy, since LHO was never convicted let alone sentenced?
 
2013-05-19 07:22:26 PM

NewportBarGuy: Isn't that the Ken Lay defense?


Also known as the Aspen Pardon. Take one for the team, literally, to save your family.
 
2013-05-19 07:23:49 PM
In the immortal words of Saint Hillary Clinton, "what difference at this point does it make?"
 
2013-05-19 07:26:39 PM
if he gets life it going to get stinky
 
2013-05-19 07:27:24 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Marcus Aurelius: NutWrench: Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?

I suppose it all depends on the terms of his police union pension, doesn't it?

I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

Still, it would be a dick move to try to rob his beneficiaries of any benefits just because this guy was an asshole.


Which is why I'm really confused that the defense attorney doesn't want to move for a dismissal.  I would think a dismissal even at this stage would be as good as never having been convicted for pension purposes.
 
2013-05-19 07:27:29 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Still, it would be a dick move to try to rob his beneficiaries of any benefits just because this guy was an asshole.


How would beneficiaries be robbed?

They earned nothing themselves.
 
WGJ
2013-05-19 07:28:12 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Marcus Aurelius: NutWrench: Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?

I suppose it all depends on the terms of his police union pension, doesn't it?

I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

Still, it would be a dick move to try to rob his beneficiaries of any benefits just because this guy was an asshole.


If that were the case, no cops would get a pension.
 
2013-05-19 07:31:53 PM
But, but, paperwork must be finished.
Can't just write "he dead" on the paperwork and expect everyone to ignore that the sentencing wasn't completed.

/We must have paperwork order, otherwise you'd get some crazy shiat like the President pardoning people at the end of his term in violation of what the Judge decreed. /s
 
2013-05-19 07:34:46 PM
Seems like a waste of resources to sentence him...
 
2013-05-19 07:41:42 PM
TuteTibiImperes:

I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

It's my understanding that committing suicide invalidates most, if not all, life insurance policies.  Not sure if it would affect pension/retirement though.
 
2013-05-19 07:43:21 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Marcus Aurelius: NutWrench: Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?

I suppose it all depends on the terms of his police union pension, doesn't it?

I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

Still, it would be a dick move to try to rob his beneficiaries of any benefits just because this guy was an asshole.


What about any restitution he might be order to pay to his victim? I could see his survivors not wanting to lose anything out of his estate, but that debt should still be recognized.
 
2013-05-19 07:47:18 PM
If there's moving forward with sentencing is meaningless, why would the defense have a problem with it?
 
2013-05-19 07:50:48 PM
They should let the victims take turns sodomizong the corpse with found objects
 
2013-05-19 07:51:17 PM
"I can't comprehend how you can go ahead and sentence someone who is dead,"

Why do people insist on inserting things like this into a sentence?
 
2013-05-19 07:52:39 PM
TFA:"I'm a little disappointed that it got postponed again," she said after the hearing. "I really just want it to be over. "

The rapist is dead.  How much more "over" could it possibly be?
 
2013-05-19 07:53:34 PM

NutWrench: Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?


If you don't have the sentencing, he is free of any restitution, still has pension rights, etc.  Remember Ken Lay (Enron).
 
2013-05-19 07:53:51 PM

HandleWithCare: TuteTibiImperes:

I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

It's my understanding that committing suicide invalidates most, if not all, life insurance policies.  Not sure if it would affect pension/retirement though.


Usually not pensions.  What would cause problems is not being in service long enough to vest the benefit.

And it isn't quite true that suicide voids most life insurance policies.  Most have a time limit the policy has to be in force for (usually 2-4 years) to prevent fraudulent purchase.  But once you are past that limitation, the benefit is generally paid no matter how you die.
 
2013-05-19 07:54:05 PM

JesseL: If there's moving forward with sentencing is meaningless, why would the defense have a problem with it?


Probably because the case was on the calendar & the defense lawyer had to show up.  Once present, why not point out the absurdity of the situation?
 
2013-05-19 07:58:38 PM
images.bridgemanart.com
 
2013-05-19 08:01:13 PM

madgonad: TuteTibiImperes: Still, it would be a dick move to try to rob his beneficiaries of any benefits just because this guy was an asshole.

How would beneficiaries be robbed?

They earned nothing themselves.


Yeah, fark inheritance, too. Learn to be boostrappy you verminous spawn!
 
2013-05-19 08:01:18 PM
No ham sandwich indictments on the docket, I take?
 
2013-05-19 08:03:30 PM
Case Dismissed. EOS
 
2013-05-19 08:04:57 PM

HandleWithCare: TuteTibiImperes:

I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

It's my understanding that committing suicide invalidates most, if not all, life insurance policies.  Not sure if it would affect pension/retirement though.


Only during the time period that the suicide clause is in effect, anywhere from 1 to 5 years (3 is the most common). As far as pension, his term of service and any termination clauses would affect that. If he wasn't on the force long enough or the fact that he committed felony rape while on the job would be issues, not a suicide.
 
2013-05-19 08:05:57 PM
Maybe judges don't get paid if there's no sentence.
 
2013-05-19 08:08:48 PM
The dirtbag is dead. A sentence is moot.

As for public servant pensions, when you're convicted of a crime you generally lose your pension and any benefits. That especially goes for felonies. There's no benefits to sue for.

/26 years til I retire with a pension
 
2013-05-19 08:10:23 PM
HandleWithCare:  It's my understanding that committing suicide invalidates most, if not all, life insurance policies.  Not sure if it would affect pension/retirement though.

Your "understanding" is wrong.  Google for "life insurance 2 year rule " and you'll get plenty of explanation.
 
2013-05-19 08:12:57 PM
Please don't give him life. Please don't give him life. Please don't give him....JESUS H. CHRIST, IT'S A ZOMBIE!
 
2013-05-19 08:13:37 PM

JesseL: If there's moving forward with sentencing is meaningless, why would the defense have a problem with it?


That was my first thought.  And my guess is that the victim or the victims family will have some kind of claim on the criminals estate, assuming the court shows a conviction and sentence, and the criminals lawyer is still fighting to keep that from getting paid out.  It's possible that there is something related to his pension or whatever, also.

Regardless, he's a kidnapper and rapist, and I don't give a flying fark about him or his family or his lawyer.  Give him whatever sentence you would have given, tell the lawyer to go fark himself, and move on to the next case.
 
2013-05-19 08:13:52 PM

rockforever: [images.bridgemanart.com image 400x265]


We're done.
 
2013-05-19 08:16:22 PM

Marcus Aurelius: I'd wager he's pretty damned unappealing already.


I'd wager you're right. And with a name like Marcus Aurelius, I'm sure you'd like a mention to Damnatio memoriae thrown out, which was a punishment sometimes given to the dead.
 
2013-05-19 08:19:32 PM
What we have here are a judge and victim who feel it's important to "send a message" to other potential rapists.

Maybe the victim has a bet on how seriously the judge takes her rape.
 
2013-05-19 08:19:41 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Marcus Aurelius: NutWrench: Sentencing happens after conviction, right? What's the point of deciding what kind of punishment is appropriate for a dead person?

I suppose it all depends on the terms of his police union pension, doesn't it?

I was wondering something along those lines - if his pension/retirement/life-insurance benefits would somehow depend on how he was sentenced, but it seems more likely that those would depend on conviction rather than a sentence.

Still, it would be a dick move to try to rob his beneficiaries of any benefits just because this guy was an asshole.


I'm not sure how benefits work in that system, but... wouldn't there be some kind of a case for the victim to get his pension if she sued civilly? After all, that pension is technically "his" money, regardless of whether or not he is alive, and is paid to beneficiaries because he is no longer alive to receive it. So if the victim sued his estate in civil court for damages (which, in today's ridiculously litigious society, is a distinct possibility), wouldn't that money go to her until the damages awarded were paid in full? Could that be why the defense attorney is pushing to get the sentencing dropped? (Personally, I agree: how the holy fark do you sentence a dead person--it's pretty farking stupid. I'm just asking a legitimate question because I'm curious to know if #1 the convicted cop keeps the benefits and #2 if the victim would have a shot in hell of getting them awarded to her if she did sue)
 
2013-05-19 08:23:08 PM
The judge is being retarded. The charges can't be dismissed as he is already convicted; a conviction ends the guilt phase of the trial. Sentencing can't go forward because there is no longer anyone to sentence. The proper legal term for what follows is an "administrative closure." This happens in civil cases when one side files a case and then fails to prosecute it within the time frame as required by the rules of civil procedures. So all the judge needs to do is order the case closed. It really is simple.
 
2013-05-19 08:25:33 PM

JuggleGeek: That was my first thought. And my guess is that the victim or the victims family will have some kind of claim on the criminals estate, assuming the court shows a conviction and sentence, and the criminals lawyer is still fighting to keep that from getting paid out. It's possible that there is something related to his pension or whatever, also.


All that is needed is the conviction. The sentence is irrelevant.
 
2013-05-19 08:26:27 PM

sheep snorter: But, but, paperwork must be finished.
Can't just write "he dead" on the paperwork and expect everyone to ignore that the sentencing wasn't completed.

/We must have paperwork order, otherwise you'd get some crazy shiat like the President pardoning people at the end of his term in violation of what the Judge decreed. /s


You know who else were fanatics about paper work?

/Sorry couldn't resist.
 
Displayed 50 of 122 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report