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(KWCH Wichita) NewsFlash Supercell with confirmed tornado bearing down on Wichita as severe weather outbreak begins in plains states. Hang tight Tornado Alley farkers, it's gonna be a bumpy evening. LGT live streaming vid   (kwch.com) divider line 129
    More: NewsFlash, severe weather, tornadoes, outbreaks  
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7407 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 May 2013 at 6:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»


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Archived thread
2013-05-19 06:51:23 PM  
4 votes:
Why must people say "pray" in times of stress? They must know after the 3rd or 10th time that it doesn't farking work.
2013-05-19 11:27:15 PM  
2 votes:

Mrtraveler01: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

Unless you're in anywhere in the lower Ohio Valley including SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's Super Outbreak of April 1974 is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up


Minor corrections, as you were a bit lazy to look it up and, well, I live in the Ohio River Tornado Alleys and have relatives who live pretty much in that rough area of Ohio. :D

For those unaware--modern storm research acknowledges at least five major "Tornado Alleys", including not only the well-known "Traditional Tornado Alley" but smaller "tornado alleys" in Florida and North Carolina as well as (relevant to our interests re superoutbreaks) Dixie Alley (stretching across roughly the non-coastal parts of the former Confederacy) and Hoosier Alley (covering largely Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and the eastern half of Missouri).  Some researchers combine the Dixie and Hoosier Alleys (due to the fact there is some significant overlap in the Ohio Valley) and the Joplin, MO tornado occured in an area considered an "overlap" region between "Traditional Tornado Alley" and Hoosier Alley.

Of particular note, whilst Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley don't have quite the yearly volume of "Traditional Tornado Alley", there is a considerably larger-than-average rate of strong-to-violent tornadoes (EF3 and above) compared to "Traditional Tornado Alley", a higher percentage of killer tornadoes (though this may be partly due to mobile homes being more common in Dixie Alley in particular), and the area does have the tendency to throw out not only superoutbreaks with both derecho-spawned and supercell-spawned tornado activity (both the original 1974 Super Outbreak and the 2011 Mega Outbreak) had their primary regions of tornadogenesis in the Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley regions) but also tend to spawn some long-track tornadoes (the longest and most deadly tornado ever recorded in the US, the Tri-State Tornado, was a typical Hoosier Alley long-track tornado; researchers had wondered whether this was a true extra-long-track tornado (of EF5 levels of violence along most of its path) or a series of multiple touchdowns, but consensus is starting to lean back to the Tri-State Tornado just being an exceptionally bad Hoosier Alley long-tracker).

Cincy and Dayton are, much like Joplin (and much like Brandenburg and Louisville and a number of other cities in the Lower Ohio Valley) right on the overlap region between two areas of tornadogenesis (Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley (for those who consider them two different Tornado Alleys) for a lot of areas along the Ohio River, Traditional Tornado Alley and Hoosier Alley in the case of Joplin).  It's not a huge shocker that they tend to get a lot of tornadoes and some fairly nasty ones.

As for Xenia...yes, they got hit pretty bad in 1974, and part of why it's so historic is because measurements from there (and Brandenburg, which seems to get a part of it hoovered regularly in tornadic weather--particularly nastily in Super Outbreak the First) helped establish the Fujita Scale in estimates of tornadic wind speeds based on damage (needless to say, the EF scale tweaked things considerably, as it was found that the original F scale tended to overestimate wind speeds...of course, it took VORTEX teams to actually measure the wind speed in a tornado to find this out).  It was also the Super Outbreak where the destructive potentials of microbursts and derechos were found (yes, there was a lot of non-tornadic wind damage from that storm).  Have a few relatives that lived not hugely far from Xenia (up in Urbana) and even a good ten years after the storm there were still parts of Xenia that hadn't yet been rebuilt...

And whilst we're on the subject of the Midwest supposedly being safe from natural disasters--those of us who live in the Hoosier Alley/Dixie Alley confluence get ALL the natural disasters except for volcanoes (and the only reason we don't get THOSE is that the rift valley that created the New Madrid and Wabash fault zones was a failed rift...there's still enough of a hot-spot in the crust in the Ozarks to fuel the hot springs around a certain eponymous town in Arkansas, though).  Earthquakes?  Yup, two major fault zones overdue for major quakes (New Madrid being the more famous one, Wabash being potentially just as dangerous) which are the only ones outside of Alaska to have ever caused XII damage on the Modified Mercalli Scale (basically to earthquakes what the EF scale is to tornadoes, a way to measure damage) and which created a series of lakes in Kentucky and Tennessee and Missouri from what amounted to riverine tsunamis that actually changed the course of the Mississippi and lowest Ohio Rivers...oh, and even a seven-pointer would LEVEL this part of the country between the ground being karst (and thus able to transmit quake waves easily) and earthquake-resistant building codes generally being nonexistent before about fifteen years ago (and a whole lot of stuff has NOT been retrofitted...including at least some bridges).  Hurricanes?  Yes, we actually tend to get at least one hurricane a year up the Ohio River Valley at least at Category 1 strength, sometimes Category 2 (we don't get formal hurricane warnings, of course, but we do get the winds and the rain).  Floods?  Yup.  Wildfires?  Yes, sometimes, in drought years (a bit more common in Appalachia, but not unknown to get grass fires and forest fires even close to Louisville in a bad drought year).   Fukushima-style NuclearDisasterGeddon?  Hasn't happened YET, but it's fairly safe to say that Paducah is Well and Truly Farked when New Madrid and/or Wabash blow or if a tornado hits the Wrong Damn Plant, seeing as they've got the only national plant for uranium enrichment for nuclear reactors just outside of town (yes, whilst there are no nuclear plants in KY, we enrich all the fuel for them).  Bonus: It'd also be a nasty chemical disaster, as their enrichment facilities are basically centrifuges for uranium hexaflouride, and the groundwater around the plant is ALREADY contaminated with technetium-99 to the point the Department of Energy provides drinking and washing water to houses and businesses nearby at no cost.
2013-05-19 10:38:48 PM  
2 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]


Unless you're in SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up
2013-05-19 10:03:59 PM  
2 votes:
Amazing video from Carney, OK tornado earlier. Mile wide, but luckily it missed populated areas while at it's peak.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIwunOsX4W4
2013-05-19 09:56:40 PM  
2 votes:

mr lawson: sid244: http://radar.weather.gov/ridge/Conus/uppermissvly_loop.php

So is the giant swirl towards the left an EF9? (I know they don't exist, but it looks like it). Similar to a hurricane on land.

nope..just the center of your normal low presure


Plus the Enhanced Fujita scale only goes up to 5
2013-05-19 08:21:18 PM  
2 votes:
If people tried to hide under that overpass, others are looking for their dental records.
2013-05-19 07:45:42 PM  
2 votes:

Fark It: Oh shiat, Reed Timmer is on the phone.  He's the Jim Cantore of tornadoes, the shiat is hitting the fan.


Jim Cantore is with Reed Timmer.  I think we're dividing by 0 here.
2013-05-19 07:18:02 PM  
2 votes:
Obviously, the solution to this is to give more tax breaks to the rich, says Gov. Brownback every day.
2013-05-19 07:00:26 PM  
2 votes:

jfarkinB: iheartscotch: / last time this happenes the amateur weather spotters actually caused more damage then the twister

Man, it must suck when the spotters come through and then there's a twister, too. Must be a lot worse than either one alone.

/I know, still not as bad as when the grammar Nazis come through


I know your laughing, but the SCARIEST thing I have ever EVER seen in regards to severe weather was last February/March when the tornadoes came through Kentucky, and I was less than a THREE MILES from where I was living at the time.. and I saw a news crew on the corner.. and there was Jim Cantore.

I'm not kidding either. I've seen things while storm chasing that would make any sane person crap themselves in horror, but seeing Jim Cantore in the same zip code as my mail box scared the hell out of me in a way I can not describe.

/I know this sounds like a joke, but i swear to god its true.
2013-05-19 06:53:46 PM  
2 votes:

Warthog: The camera crew on the live feed just blew through a red light.  Do they get to do that?


TWC pays the tickets.

/Part of the reason that assnozzle Reed Timmer and crew lost their ride with Discovery Channel was because they filmed themselves doing REALLY stupid crap like that... One time they blew past an ambulance, in a no passing zone, with the cameras rolling. That was pretty much the beginning of the end for them. (Or so I have been told)

//Also one of the big reasons I stopped chasing.
2013-05-19 06:43:52 PM  
2 votes:
"Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.
2013-05-19 06:40:49 PM  
2 votes:
They sent out a warning, but apparently everybody knows about it from the Queen of England to the hounds of hell.
2013-05-19 06:40:32 PM  
2 votes:
Ah, so now we get to hear why it's okay for Brownback to request federal aid, but it was bad for Christie to do it.

Should we start a betting pool on how long that takes?
2013-05-19 06:25:34 PM  
2 votes:

2xhelix: F4, a mile wide and still growing.  Damn that's a beast of a tornado!


For some reason, I always have a mental image of F4 as meaning F*CKF*CKF*CKF*CK!

/slightly appropriate, I guess
//stay safe, all in that area
2013-05-19 04:46:20 PM  
2 votes:
You know it's bad when NWS evacuates their station.  Hope my friends up there are riding it out ok.
2013-05-20 08:15:18 AM  
1 votes:
Moderate risk extended to TX/OK border. Hope Joplin makes it alright today.
www.spc.noaa.gov
2013-05-20 08:02:03 AM  
1 votes:

7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.

Yep, thats the Bridge Creek/Moore storm we have been talking about.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 600x450]

Thats what an EF5 does to your truck.

and now I see what I said was previously mentioned. :( I really should go to bed.

Nah.. its cool! We love it when we get to have fun conversations with people actually interested in the subject matter... v/s TROLLTROLLOLOLOLOBHENGAZIUMBRELLAGATE

LOL yeah that gets old fast. I've lived in OK all my life. Closest I've been to a tornado was on May 8th 1986. Edmond tornado. I will remember that night forever.

I've been in 7. Two of those before I was 12, and 4 of them on purpose...

Also managed to get my vehicle struck by lightning for the 2nd time last week.. and i wasn't even chasing, i was just driving home!

I was a very amateur chaser in the 90's, trained spotter now, and I just get lucky a bunch.

Growing up in a town that was hit by a F4 it just becomes part of who you are... and you either get scared of it, or you learn to grok it. I did the latter and it kinda set me up for life as one of those weathergeeks

I grew up in OKC/Edmond and I really wanted to be a storm chaser when I was a kid. Even went to one of "Those Terrible Twisters" shows with Gary England. Used to ride along with some amateur chasers around 2001 but never saw anything.


I still think the best old-style tornado documentary is The Day Of The Killer Tornadoes.

its about the 74 super outbreak.

you can find it on YouTube.
2013-05-20 08:01:13 AM  
1 votes:

ontariolightning: Why must people say "pray" in times of stress? They must know after the 3rd or 10th time that it doesn't farking work.


Because it provides comfort, and that should be good enough.  Why do people like you insist on getting online and arguing matters of faith?  You should know after the 3rd or 10th time that the people who do believe don't give a rat's ass about what you think.
2013-05-20 07:02:39 AM  
1 votes:
This thread sure got educational in a hurry.

Thanks gents.
2013-05-20 02:19:23 AM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: The Netherlands, interestingly, is also a bit of a spot of tornadogenesis in Europe (including some tornadoes that would be likely classified as EF-4 here in the States),


Italy has been getting some very photogenic tornadoes in the last two years.
2013-05-20 02:15:06 AM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: There is starting to be some cell integration with community based warning systems, but it's still not perfect--I've seen tornado warnings come across via the "emergency alert system MMS" some 45 minutes AFTER issuance by the NWS, about five minutes before it's meant to expire (and thus making it useless).


What kills me is that it was discussed with SPRINT and the NWS in 97 (97!!!!) but they didn't want to integrate because they feared it would lead to liability.

Heh, thats how I ended up in Norman talking to the NSSL and NWS about how it could be made to work for common carriers, and what would be required on either end.
That was when I met the chasers I got to tag along with (small world)

And yes, basically IPAWS.

The SPRINT engineers I talked to back in 1997 told me that they could make every phone in range of a tower SCREAM for 20 seconds, with EXISTING technology back then, as long as it had power, with almost no lag. Just a specific ping.

Did you know that Ohio is using EAS for freaking Amber alerts now? WAY TO MAKE PEOPLE IGNORE ALERTS AT 3AM!

Argh... So yeah, thats what I wanted to do was targeting EAS down to cell level and making multimedia information more accessible to seniors and at-risk persons in emergencies (Basically, make it as simple as possible, but more than enough info so it wasn't useless)
2013-05-20 01:43:50 AM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: (Bangladesh, in case you're curious, is about the only place in the world that has the level of tornadogenesis that exists in the Tornado Alleys in the US. They also pretty routinely get hundreds of people killed in a single tornado (because things like "tornado warnings" and "tornado shelters" just do not exist in Bangladesh) and at least one tornado has caused over 1300 deaths as recently as 1989. If the Jarrell tornado had hit in Dallas, it'd easily dwarf that death toll, sadly.)


I'm so so very terrified of EF4 or shiatting something like Bonnaroo or PENNSIC or a large Renaissance faire (where I spend a lot of weekends) that there is no word for it.

Thats why I really want to see CELLULAR TOWER BASED warning systems embedded in all devices, regardless of network subscription or service level, that can warn people DIRECTLY in the path of a storm in good time.

(Say hello to what would have been my thesis)
2013-05-20 01:37:23 AM  
1 votes:

7th Son of a 7th Son: I grew up in OKC/Edmond and I really wanted to be a storm chaser when I was a kid. Even went to one of "Those Terrible Twisters" shows with Gary England. Used to ride along with some amateur chasers around 2001 but never saw anything.


I really would have loved to get in with a REAL research team and do some chasing, but ... when it got popular it got stupid and polarized. I can't afford to (or have the education) to run with the big guys, and I simply WON'T make a bad situation worse by running with the commercial guys or the rogues/tornado tourism teams.

I'm glad to say that I was able to do it when it was more dangerous, but less insane.

OMG.. I'M A TORNADO HIPSTER!
2013-05-20 01:36:49 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: Unless I win the lottery (which, you know.. I cant afford to play) a 6 year degree in Emergency Management systems/Information Management is a non-starter

So you're a typical US American I know the feeling, so am I it's a crazy world. You seem quite smart and social so you shouldn't have problems in the job market, yea, yea there needs to be a market first.

Its funny, I have worked IT for 14 years, and just moved from Cincy to Columbus, and there are a farkton more jobs up here (at least.. more listings) than there were down there.

Now I just need to get one. For a few months. I'm moving to Florida this winter, so... then I get to start over


Best of luck : )
2013-05-20 01:34:27 AM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: ds_4815: Oddly enough, the old Fujita (F-scale) actually did go all the way to F12, equivalent to Mach 1. F5 was simply the naturally-assumed extreme end of the spectrum since nothing that would be considered F6 and above had ever been observed.

I think I recall reading (and it has been some time) that the Greensburg Tornado might well have been an F6 if the EF scale had not been in use at that time.

I did not know that I thought even the old Fujita scale only went to 5, and the new EF rating still only goes to 5 it just corresponds more to the destruction seen on the ground than estimated wind speeds by radar,

There's some rather interesting history re the (old) Fujita scale, and why we use the new EF scale (which actually is quite a bit more accurate)...

The old F scale, interestingly, was not originally developed at all for storms but (seriously) for measurement of damage from nuclear blast; the original version pretty much treated it as an extension of the Beaufort scale up to Mach 1.  The 1974 Super Outbreak was really the first time the Fujita scale had been used for civilian use in measuring general (non-blast-related) wind damage.  (It also went in theory all the way up to F12, but it was generally assumed that you'd never actually see anything beyond F5 levels of damage in something not involving Nuclear Farking Weapons.  Jarrell, TX is about the closest we've seen to where a tornado has tried its very, very best to keep up with the amount of destruction the blast from an A-bomb or H-bomb can cause.)

Around the time of the Moore tornado (and after a few other measurements not focusing on tornadoes--including, notably, Hurricane Andrew (which around that time was recognised as being actually a Category 5 hurricane instead of a Category 4--it actually got formally reclassified a few years back), some of the initial VORTEX Mobile Doppler measurements, and Cyclone Olivia in Australia which had a recorded wind gust well in ...


Wow, I learned something today, storta makes sense even though my brain want's to rebel against the idea, I mean in a nuke I wanna believe it's all straight line winds even with reading survivors reports about fire tornadoes and realizing winds don't always travel in straight lines.
/Sad story bro
2013-05-20 01:34:23 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.

Yep, thats the Bridge Creek/Moore storm we have been talking about.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 600x450]

Thats what an EF5 does to your truck.

and now I see what I said was previously mentioned. :( I really should go to bed.

Nah.. its cool! We love it when we get to have fun conversations with people actually interested in the subject matter... v/s TROLLTROLLOLOLOLOBHENGAZIUMBRELLAGATE

LOL yeah that gets old fast. I've lived in OK all my life. Closest I've been to a tornado was on May 8th 1986. Edmond tornado. I will remember that night forever.

I've been in 7. Two of those before I was 12, and 4 of them on purpose...

Also managed to get my vehicle struck by lightning for the 2nd time last week.. and i wasn't even chasing, i was just driving home!

I was a very amateur chaser in the 90's, trained spotter now, and I just get lucky a bunch.

Growing up in a town that was hit by a F4 it just becomes part of who you are... and you either get scared of it, or you learn to grok it. I did the latter and it kinda set me up for life as one of those weathergeeks


I grew up in OKC/Edmond and I really wanted to be a storm chaser when I was a kid. Even went to one of "Those Terrible Twisters" shows with Gary England. Used to ride along with some amateur chasers around 2001 but never saw anything.
2013-05-20 01:28:44 AM  
1 votes:

7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.

Yep, thats the Bridge Creek/Moore storm we have been talking about.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 600x450]

Thats what an EF5 does to your truck.

and now I see what I said was previously mentioned. :( I really should go to bed.

Nah.. its cool! We love it when we get to have fun conversations with people actually interested in the subject matter... v/s TROLLTROLLOLOLOLOBHENGAZIUMBRELLAGATE

LOL yeah that gets old fast. I've lived in OK all my life. Closest I've been to a tornado was on May 8th 1986. Edmond tornado. I will remember that night forever.


I've been in 7. Two of those before I was 12, and 4 of them on purpose...

Also managed to get my vehicle struck by lightning for the 2nd time last week.. and i wasn't even chasing, i was just driving home!

I was a very amateur chaser in the 90's, trained spotter now, and I just get lucky a bunch.

Growing up in a town that was hit by a F4 it just becomes part of who you are... and you either get scared of it, or you learn to grok it. I did the latter and it kinda set me up for life as one of those weathergeeks
2013-05-20 01:25:31 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.

Yep, thats the Bridge Creek/Moore storm we have been talking about.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 600x450]

Thats what an EF5 does to your truck.

and now I see what I said was previously mentioned. :( I really should go to bed.

Nah.. its cool! We love it when we get to have fun conversations with people actually interested in the subject matter... v/s TROLLTROLLOLOLOLOBHENGAZIUMBRELLAGATE


LOL yeah that gets old fast. I've lived in OK all my life. Closest I've been to a tornado was on May 8th 1986. Edmond tornado. I will remember that night forever.
2013-05-20 01:24:11 AM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: Unless I win the lottery (which, you know.. I cant afford to play) a 6 year degree in Emergency Management systems/Information Management is a non-starter

So you're a typical US American I know the feeling, so am I it's a crazy world. You seem quite smart and social so you shouldn't have problems in the job market, yea, yea there needs to be a market first.


Its funny, I have worked IT for 14 years, and just moved from Cincy to Columbus, and there are a farkton more jobs up here (at least.. more listings) than there were down there.

Now I just need to get one. For a few months. I'm moving to Florida this winter, so... then I get to start over
2013-05-20 01:22:25 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Unless I win the lottery (which, you know.. I cant afford to play) a 6 year degree in Emergency Management systems/Information Management is a non-starter


So you're a typical US American I know the feeling, so am I it's a crazy world. You seem quite smart and social so you shouldn't have problems in the job market, yea, yea there needs to be a market first.
2013-05-20 01:20:04 AM  
1 votes:

7th Son of a 7th Son: Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.

Yep, thats the Bridge Creek/Moore storm we have been talking about.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 600x450]

Thats what an EF5 does to your truck.

and now I see what I said was previously mentioned. :( I really should go to bed.


Nah.. its cool! We love it when we get to have fun conversations with people actually interested in the subject matter... v/s TROLLTROLLOLOLOLOBHENGAZIUMBRELLAGATE
2013-05-20 01:18:39 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: 7th Son of a 7th Son: The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.

Yep, thats the Bridge Creek/Moore storm we have been talking about.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 600x450]

Thats what an EF5 does to your truck.


and now I see what I said was previously mentioned. :( I really should go to bed.
2013-05-20 01:16:50 AM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: ds_4815: Oddly enough, the old Fujita (F-scale) actually did go all the way to F12, equivalent to Mach 1. F5 was simply the naturally-assumed extreme end of the spectrum since nothing that would be considered F6 and above had ever been observed.

I think I recall reading (and it has been some time) that the Greensburg Tornado might well have been an F6 if the EF scale had not been in use at that time.

I did not know that I thought even the old Fujita scale only went to 5, and the new EF rating still only goes to 5 it just corresponds more to the destruction seen on the ground than estimated wind speeds by radar,


There's some rather interesting history re the (old) Fujita scale, and why we use the new EF scale (which actually is quite a bit more accurate)...

The old F scale, interestingly, was not originally developed at all for storms but (seriously) for measurement of damage from nuclear blast; the original version pretty much treated it as an extension of the Beaufort scale up to Mach 1.  The 1974 Super Outbreak was really the first time the Fujita scale had been used for civilian use in measuring general (non-blast-related) wind damage.  (It also went in theory all the way up to F12, but it was generally assumed that you'd never actually see anything beyond F5 levels of damage in something not involving Nuclear Farking Weapons.  Jarrell, TX is about the closest we've seen to where a tornado has tried its very, very best to keep up with the amount of destruction the blast from an A-bomb or H-bomb can cause.)

Around the time of the Moore tornado (and after a few other measurements not focusing on tornadoes--including, notably, Hurricane Andrew (which around that time was recognised as being actually a Category 5 hurricane instead of a Category 4--it actually got formally reclassified a few years back), some of the initial VORTEX Mobile Doppler measurements, and Cyclone Olivia in Australia which had a recorded wind gust well into modern EF4 range) it was beginning to be recognised that there were two flaws in the Fujita scale.

One was that (even accounting for the Well Constructed Homes that the Fujita scale made a VERY big assumption about) wind speeds tended to be overestimated by 30 to 40 percent (it turned out that it didn't require as high of wind speeds as we thought to cause "F4" and "F5" levels of damage).

The other flaw was...well...to put it bluntly, "Well Constructed Homes" of the type assumed by the original Fujita scale tend to be surprisingly uncommon.  It turns out that a lot of homes tended to have substandard construction in one way or another--weak bolts on the foundation, roof built without hurricane straps in high wind regions, cheap crappy wood in frame construction, and so on.

So after a lot of engineering studies and more research (both in wind tunnels and "in the field" including more mobile Doppler measurements and comparison with other types of wind damage in Category 4 and Category 5 hurricanes and the like), in 2007 we got the Enhanced Fujita Scale which not only tends to knock the wind speeds down but takes a lot more construction factors into account.  (Among other things, it does pretty expressly take into account that sometimes you will have crappy construction that makes a home more vulnerable to tornado damage, and includes factors to "tweak" for that instead of just treating all frame houses equally.  This is one reason why the EF scale is not directly comparable to the old F scale.)

They also pretty much (since this was more of a derivative scale and not a "How Good Does The H-Bomb Blow Shiat Up" scale adapted to measure "How Much The Tornado Farked Shiat Up"--more an explicitly designed "How Much The Tornado Farked Shiat Up When Accounting For Cheap-Ass Construction" scale) did away with anything above "EF-5"--partly because it was seen as Completely Irrelevant as nothing had EVER been classified "F6" that had Not Involved Nuclear Farking Weapons, and partly to establish a sense of parity with the Saffir-Simpson scale we use for measuring hurricane winds.

Cliff's Notes version: There used to be an F6-F12, but it never has been used in civvie use of the Fujita Scale (which actually was developed to measure destructiveness of one of the few things scarier than a violent tornado--unless the tornado hits the nuke plant, you don't usually have to worry about radiation sickness from a tornado).  When we fixed what we found was broken with the Fujita Scale, we just set five levels to it as that's all we'd ever used and it also fits well with the hurricane scale we use now.
2013-05-20 01:15:41 AM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: Great Porn Dragon: (Also, an attempt to list this as a world record measurement was shot down because apparently records require wind speeds measured at ground level--the mobile Doppler reading was some 100 feet in the tornado itself, and for obvious reasons an anenometer is not exactly going to survive an F5 tornado. :D)

That storm WAS pretty significant, however, because not only was it the first time wind speeds had been measured in a tornado but it also led to the general tweaks (in the engineering studies that followed) that led to the EF scale (which not only tweaks the speeds downwards but takes into account a lot of engineering info--such as the fact that there is apparently a lot of slipshod-enough construction out there to make homes tornadically vulnerable).

Nods nods and more nods.

I have read a veritable library on Moore/Bridge Creek, but not so much about Jarrell.

Every time I start reading now it makes me wanna go to school and get back on my career track, which is statistically impossible for me right now, so it just gets depressing.

Why if you don't mind me asking, although I would love to go into meteorology but really I'm to old to start into that,


I'm 40, I have $200,000 in medical debt, and I'm jobless again since my last contract completed with GE.

Right now I'm barely able to secure basic "food/place to sleep/clothing" essentials.

Unless I win the lottery (which, you know.. I cant afford to play) a 6 year degree in Emergency Management  systems/Information Management is a non-starter
2013-05-20 01:12:58 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: I do seem to remember accounts of similar occurrences near Tokyo with their subduction fault

Have you ever seen The Sinking Of Japan?

Great movie... especially if you like epic nightmare fuel.

I may have to see if I can find it, hmmmm.

It's on the Youtubes, and other places have it. Subtitles required, but wow .. Great disaster porn.


Cool thanks : )
Yes I do love disaster movies even if it is only to see how bad they can be : )
2013-05-20 01:10:44 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Great Porn Dragon: (Also, an attempt to list this as a world record measurement was shot down because apparently records require wind speeds measured at ground level--the mobile Doppler reading was some 100 feet in the tornado itself, and for obvious reasons an anenometer is not exactly going to survive an F5 tornado. :D)

That storm WAS pretty significant, however, because not only was it the first time wind speeds had been measured in a tornado but it also led to the general tweaks (in the engineering studies that followed) that led to the EF scale (which not only tweaks the speeds downwards but takes into account a lot of engineering info--such as the fact that there is apparently a lot of slipshod-enough construction out there to make homes tornadically vulnerable).

Nods nods and more nods.

I have read a veritable library on Moore/Bridge Creek, but not so much about Jarrell.

Every time I start reading now it makes me wanna go to school and get back on my career track, which is statistically impossible for me right now, so it just gets depressing.


Why if you don't mind me asking, although I would love to go into meteorology but really I'm to old to start into that,
2013-05-20 01:05:25 AM  
1 votes:

7th Son of a 7th Son: The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.


Yep, thats the Bridge Creek/Moore storm we have been talking about.

upload.wikimedia.org

Thats what an EF5 does to your truck.
2013-05-20 01:03:03 AM  
1 votes:
The May 3rd 1999 tornado had confirmed windspeeds of 318 mph. Holy freaking god that's fast.
2013-05-20 01:01:10 AM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: (Also, an attempt to list this as a world record measurement was shot down because apparently records require wind speeds measured at ground level--the mobile Doppler reading was some 100 feet in the tornado itself, and for obvious reasons an anenometer is not exactly going to survive an F5 tornado. :D)

That storm WAS pretty significant, however, because not only was it the first time wind speeds had been measured in a tornado but it also led to the general tweaks (in the engineering studies that followed) that led to the EF scale (which not only tweaks the speeds downwards but takes into account a lot of engineering info--such as the fact that there is apparently a lot of slipshod-enough construction out there to make homes tornadically vulnerable).


Nods nods and more nods.

I have read a veritable library on Moore/Bridge Creek, but not so much about Jarrell.

Every time I start reading now it makes me wanna go to school and get back on my career track, which is statistically impossible for me right now, so it just gets depressing.
2013-05-20 12:58:12 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Great Porn Dragon: but not the real Tornadic Nightmare Fuel that came out of Jarrell.

There is a part of me that really wishes we had the kind of photography and data transfer tech we have now back in 1974.

There was damage between Mason and Sharonville (Twister #44, the one that hit our farm) that was mindboggling. I know that they considered it a strong F4 when it hit the farm, but I personally know of two houses that were ripped from their foundations, with plumbing physically ripped out of the poured basement, and scoured asphalt. Those were on Sunburst drive less than 1/4 mile from the house.

Hell, our John Deere was thrown more than 3/4 of a mile.. But with the devastation in Xenia and Saylor Park... no one ever came to look. (I wish I had been old enough to remember the actual event, but I was only 1.. but my dad met Dr Fujita [or at least his team] up at WPAFB after the storms.


Well I know of houses taken completely of their foundations in EF4's but not sure about the scoured concrete. EF4's are unbelievable. I wish I could find my pics of what one did. EF5's are pretty much wipe the Earth clean not much left were it was.
2013-05-20 12:55:56 AM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: I do seem to remember accounts of similar occurrences near Tokyo with their subduction fault


Have you ever seen The Sinking Of Japan?

Great movie... especially if you like epic nightmare fuel.
2013-05-20 12:40:52 AM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: I myself would argue that probably the most dangerous fault system in the US isn't New Madrid or Wabash, though--try the Cascadia fault system along the coast of Washington and British Columbia (that one throws Fukushima/Boxing Day Tsunami level 9.0+ about every three hundred years or so, and is overdue; there's also some VERY real concern that when Cascadia blows (and pretty much wipes Seattle, Bellingham, and Vancouver off the map) that it could trigger ALL the Three Sisters and add Hot Lava Doom along with the Tsunami Doom and Earthquake Doom and Half-Of-Seattle-Sliding-Into-The-Freaking-Pacific-Because-Said-Half-Is -Built-On-Landfill-That-In-A-Quake-Turns-To-The-Consistency-Of-The-Ave rage-Passengers-Liquishiats-During-A-Rotavirus-Fueled-Carnival-Lines-P oop-Cruise Doom).

(That last one, incidentially, is pretty much why everything from about Columbus west is farked when New Madrid and/or the Wabash Fault blows; karst land and areas with lots of rivers tend, shall we say, to liquefy in a good flood; a major earthquake would pretty much turn the Ohio Valley into a big farking jello bowl.)



I agree pretty much, Cascadia Subduction zone is the bigger risk and while it may seem far fetched to some with the volcanoes going off soon after I do seem to remember accounts of similar occurrences near Tokyo with their subduction fault and Mt. Fuji from a 100+ years ago, and you're very correct at least as far as my understanding goes Seattle much like San Francisco has lot's of places built on landfill that can liquidate in quakes. The US would lose some of it's greatest ports and all the high tech companies there.

Granted that is one of the fears of the New Madrid going is that it would sever trade between the eastern and western sections of the country if the bridges went and the Midwest might not be able to use the Mississippi river for some time.
2013-05-20 12:26:05 AM  
1 votes:

ds_4815: Oddly enough, the old Fujita (F-scale) actually did go all the way to F12, equivalent to Mach 1. F5 was simply the naturally-assumed extreme end of the spectrum since nothing that would be considered F6 and above had ever been observed.


I think I recall reading (and it has been some time) that the Greensburg Tornado might well have been an F6 if the EF scale had not been in use at that time.
2013-05-20 12:13:07 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: Granted it was just a passing fancy and looking at it closer could reveal more but December (I believe that's when the first New Madrid quake happened )

There were 4 Big quakes and many aftershocks greater than 7.0 (up to 8.0) over a period of weeks.

It really must have seemed like the end of days....


To my understanding that is what the inhabitant's near the epicenter(s) thought. I mean strange light's in the sky(see Tecumseh, and he took it as time to free his people, see Fort Mims, 1812 Cherokee uprising) , then the quakes, river flows backwards floods towns, more and more quakes sand geysers blasting into the air. And people wonder why this is called the bible belt (only half kidding)
2013-05-19 11:54:53 PM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: (That last one, incidentially, is pretty much why everything from about Columbus west is farked when New Madrid and/or the Wabash Fault blows; karst land and areas with lots of rivers tend, shall we say, to liquefy in a good flood; a major earthquake would pretty much turn the Ohio Valley into a big farking jello bowl.)


Yup yup...

People who don't live here just don't seem to understand how *different* the geology here is in regards to seismic wave propagation.

Hell, that 3.1 this week in Ottawa was felt very easily in Cincinnati. That's 750 miles... for a 3.1.

A 3.1 in California is barely noticeable more than 50 miles from the epicenter.
2013-05-19 11:52:53 PM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: Stone Meadow:

BTW, can one even feel a 2.8?

Sometimes if you're close. Remember east of the Rockies the soil has a different composition and carries more vibration further.
/Hope I said that right.


IIRC, the land on the Right Coast is more "solid" than the land out here in California so that the energy from an earthquake propagates more efficiently on the Eastern portion of the US.  Here in California, the land has been broken up so many times from previous earthquakes that the energy dissipates very quickly.  Unless the earthquake is especially massive, you have to be quite close to the epicenter to feel it here in California.  The same can't be said for a similarly-sized earthquake on the other coast; there, a single quake can be felt for hundreds of miles around.
2013-05-19 11:37:33 PM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: Aigoo: Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...

I mean I know it's an active volcano and if I lived nearby I would probably have learned a lot more vulcanology, but I mean like anything out of the norm, granted that doesn't mean anything. Just like a year or more ago there was a 5(?) magnitude on a fault near the New Madrid did that mean anything well it hasn't yet but it was different.

There is apparently a more dangerous fault line north of New Madrid that is called the Wasatch if I recall correctly.

Either way, when either one of them lets go it will be the end of Memphis and most of St Louis, and will cause massive damage as far away as Chicago and Columbus


Most of the towns and cities of the Mississippi River Valley will fair poorly due to the old brick construction, at least from what I hear some bridges and things are being retrofitted. If there's a big one along any of the old fault lines, and I'm guessing there are still some undiscovered ones.

Also to the California earthquake savey farkers do y'all have sand geysers during your earthquakes? Those were reported during the 1800's quakes.

Oh and Shadow Blasko my grandmothers house the walls remained up since it wasn't a direct hit but there were all kinds of bits and pieces stuck in one of the outer walls
/Granted lost most of the roof and the house actually twisted on it's foundation so it was totaled
//3 people lost their lives in that storm back in 2008 their houses were leveled to the foundation.
///Organically it was classified an EF3 but later upgraded to EF4
//amazing seeing the destruction along it's path
/I really do feel for the people today and what they now have to go through
2013-05-19 11:13:14 PM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: Aigoo: Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...

I mean I know it's an active volcano and if I lived nearby I would probably have learned a lot more vulcanology, but I mean like anything out of the norm, granted that doesn't mean anything. Just like a year or more ago there was a 5(?) magnitude on a fault near the New Madrid did that mean anything well it hasn't yet but it was different.


There is apparently a more dangerous fault line north of New Madrid that is called the Wasatch if I recall correctly.

Either way, when either one of them lets go it will be the end of Memphis and most of St Louis, and will cause massive damage as far away as Chicago and Columbus
2013-05-19 10:50:05 PM  
1 votes:

Mrtraveler01: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

Unless you're in SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up


The storm you are talking about was April 4th, 1974.

And no, we won't forget it. I can't, I have a scar on my shoulder from it, (well, the same storm line, twister #44 that day... the Xenia twister was #37 )

That outbreak started in Illinois on the 3rd, but by the end of the 4th there were tornadoes in 13 states and one Canadian province.

/The farm that my family lived on was hit hard that day, and to this day you can walk through the field and find pieces of wood and ceramic chunks of insulators from power lines.
2013-05-19 10:49:09 PM  
1 votes:

God-is-a-Taco: Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.


More sensitive recording equipment.
2013-05-19 10:46:57 PM  
1 votes:
Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.
2013-05-19 10:38:05 PM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]


i99.photobucket.com

Me 2 days after May 31, 1985 OH/PA outbreak.  Niles, OH.  Former skating rink

And I figured Ohioans hadn't forgotten  Xenia.yet.
2013-05-19 10:20:23 PM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: [pbs.twimg.com image 600x900]

Nice (As it crossed I-40)

It's only nice because it's not going through a city at that moment. That also looks very much like the one going through Cullman Alabama's suburbs in 2011 (it was being shown live) before the power went out when one of the Nuke plants power lines got hit.


Yeah. The phone call I got after that happened was not fun. " So you know you guys aren't gonna have power for as long as a month."
2013-05-19 10:13:31 PM  
1 votes:

aevorea: "Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.


I grew up in Oklahoma but now live in Los Angeles.  I much prefer tornadoes to earthquakes; at least with tornadoes, you get ample warnings to take shelter.  Can't say the same about earthquakes.
2013-05-19 10:05:50 PM  
1 votes:

Bunny Deville: tinfoil-hat maggie: Bunny Deville: He's in northern Lauderdale County. That thing was seriously headed right for him, we were both pretty freaked out. I had to track it for him because of course his satellite went out.

I started watching it when it was NW of Athens, my mom called wanted to know if it was safe to get on the road from where she was to home. And yea that's a problem with satellite also my internet connection can get fritzy with storms. That was the worst thing about the April 27th tornadoes the power going out and relying solely on radio. I felt like I was a teen again.

Oh, this was a different one. You're talking about the one that went up into TN. My friend posted pics of that one on Facebook when it was near Athens. I was supposed to drive up to Fayetteville that day for powerball tickets, I'm glad I didn't. Got caught on that same stretch of road two years ago in a microburst... lightning truck a power line and it fell on the car and scared the shiat out of us, then we were nearly killed by a flying rack of ferns. I kept screaming for my friend to pull the fark over and her husband kept screaming at her to drive faster. I ended up calling my husband and telling him that I was about to die and that I loved him and the kids.


So was it awkward between u and ur friends husband afterwards?
2013-05-19 09:54:52 PM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: Bunny Deville: He's in northern Lauderdale County. That thing was seriously headed right for him, we were both pretty freaked out. I had to track it for him because of course his satellite went out.

I started watching it when it was NW of Athens, my mom called wanted to know if it was safe to get on the road from where she was to home. And yea that's a problem with satellite also my internet connection can get fritzy with storms. That was the worst thing about the April 27th tornadoes the power going out and relying solely on radio. I felt like I was a teen again.


Oh, this was a different one. You're talking about the one that went up into TN. My friend posted pics of that one on Facebook when it was near Athens. I was supposed to drive up to Fayetteville that day for powerball tickets, I'm glad I didn't. Got caught on that same stretch of road two years ago in a microburst... lightning truck a power line and it fell on the car and scared the shiat out of us, then we were nearly killed by a flying rack of ferns. I kept screaming for my friend to pull the fark over and her husband kept screaming at her to drive faster. I ended up calling my husband and telling him that I was about to die and that I loved him and the kids.
2013-05-19 09:52:25 PM  
1 votes:

God-is-a-Taco: "East of Norman" according to the weatherman:


Not saying it's fake but that almost looks like a bunch of individual hailstones stuck together
2013-05-19 09:47:19 PM  
1 votes:

sid244: http://radar.weather.gov/ridge/Conus/uppermissvly_loop.php

So is the giant swirl towards the left an EF9? (I know they don't exist, but it looks like it). Similar to a hurricane on land.


nope..just the center of your normal low presure
2013-05-19 09:46:05 PM  
1 votes:

Tom_Slick: God-is-a-Taco: "East of Norman" according to the weatherman:

[i.imgur.com image 713x396]

Holy shiatballs


Damn that is like a cauliflower.
2013-05-19 09:46:05 PM  
1 votes:
Yikes! We just flew over those storm cells. It was bumpy but wouldn't have guessed there were tornados. Hope my next flight doesn't get caught up in this weather.
2013-05-19 09:40:05 PM  
1 votes:
http://radar.weather.gov/ridge/Conus/uppermissvly_loop.php

So is the giant swirl towards the left an EF9? (I know they don't exist, but it looks like it). Similar to a hurricane on land.
2013-05-19 09:33:46 PM  
1 votes:

UnspokenVoice: Tom_Slick: Aigoo: So, I'm sorry; you were saying about tornadoes and how good we have it?

You are not Mississippi who gets Tornadoes AND Hurricanes or something like that.

/If you want to avoid severe weather move to Maine, lived in northern Maine for 15 years other than the occasional blizzard now big weather problems and you can prepare for for blizzards.

Believe it or not, that was a prime consideration for my retiring here.



When he got home, he asked his wife, Tabitha, "Why are we still here?" Here, as in frigid Maine.
Until then, he says, "we never really came to terms with the idea that we were rich." When they did, they headed to the west coast of Florida ("surprisingly funky," King says). At first they rented, then bought a winter home, near Sarasota.

--- Stephen King
2013-05-19 09:30:52 PM  
1 votes:
Currently in Indiana visiting relatives. Looks like the severe stuff wont make it this far east but we might be drivimg through some stuff on the way back down slug tomorrow. Everyone stay safe
2013-05-19 09:16:57 PM  
1 votes:

Matthew Keene: God-is-a-Taco: Seattle has that problem as well, although it's mostly in regards to a tsunami from an offshore one.

I'd like to shake the hand of any tsunami that could make two right turns to get into Puget Sound to affect downtown Seattle.


It's much easier than you think.  The underwater geography is such that it would easily channel and amplify any tsunami that did come in.

There's also concern from an earthquake causing a Whidbey Island (or a similar Sound Island) rockfall creating a massive wave in itself.

/minored in rocks for jocks at UW-Seattle
//also, I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
///slashies come in threes
2013-05-19 09:13:06 PM  
1 votes:

Random Name Generator: Day 2 moderate for tomorrow: including Tulsa, E. OK, Springfield MO, and Joplin.


Because that's all Joplin needs right now.

TWC reporting multiple fatalities in Shawnee.
2013-05-19 09:11:44 PM  
1 votes:
Day 2 moderate for tomorrow: including Tulsa, E. OK, Springfield MO, and Joplin.
i.imgur.com
2013-05-19 09:07:28 PM  
1 votes:

ariseatex: Bunny Deville: Ariseatex, are you seeing this huge rotation in the middle of the storm near Welty? I'm thinking either it's nothing or it's gonna be huge.

That was huge, but it's weakening.  I'm not ruling out reformation, though, on that one.


I hope they're keeping their eye on it. I can just see that one spitting out a mile wide F4 or something.

Also, I do hope this crap isn't headed my way next. The other day I had to track for my dad because there was a little one headed right for his house. He saw the funnel cloud and got 2 inches of rain in 20 minutes.
kth
2013-05-19 08:51:48 PM  
1 votes:

ariseatex: kth: We just got 70 mph straight lines in warrensburg. Power flickers. Power lines in trees, which are now on fire.

I'm assuming you're seeing this on TV & not out your window.  Unless your first reaction when watching a dangerous fire is to post about it on Fark.

/seriously, stay safe


Scanner feed. If there was a fire I would not be playing with my phone.
2013-05-19 08:50:28 PM  
1 votes:

ontariolightning: You havent been in a real blizzard if you can walk 5 feet in it.

So much this.  I will take a blizzard over tornadoes any day of the week.  If I am walking down the street during the middle of a blizzard I still stand a damned good chance of making it home alive.  Hell, if I am walking in a blizzard chances are that I am already within walking distance of my home and barring some freak accident I will make it home alive.  If I am walking down the street in the middle of a tornado, well, chances are I am not walking down the street any mo ...


Live in Chicago.  Grew up in Buffalo.  Lived in Finland.  I know what a real blizzard is.
2013-05-19 08:46:53 PM  
1 votes:
This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.
2013-05-19 08:36:19 PM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: I understand the human interest part of it... but why are they concentrating on the trailer park that was destroyed when there are still places that are directly under threat?


At least that met is trying to get the message through to Welty...but now we're back to the trailer park.

DAMMIT, go back to telling Welty to take shelter. Ten minutes is...potentially lifesaving lead time. They need to NOT SHUT UP about Welty.
2013-05-19 08:33:03 PM  
1 votes:
I understand the human interest part of it... but why are they concentrating on the trailer park that was destroyed when there are still places that are directly under threat?
2013-05-19 08:31:23 PM  
1 votes:
You havent been in a real blizzard if you can walk 5 feet in it.

 

So much this.  I will take a blizzard over tornadoes any day of the week.  If I am walking down the street during the middle of a blizzard I still stand a damned good chance of making it home alive.  Hell, if I am walking in a blizzard chances are that I am already within walking distance of my home and barring some freak accident I will make it home alive.  If I am walking down the street in the middle of a tornado, well, chances are I am not walking down the street any mo ...
2013-05-19 08:28:36 PM  
1 votes:

make me some tea: Goddamn Norman, OK again. That place is like ground zero for these things.


Clearly, you have never heard of Moore, OK...

/live in S OKC
//too goddamn close to Moore
///siren serenade all afternoon, but safe. Wish Shawnee was as well :(
2013-05-19 08:28:01 PM  
1 votes:
Wow  www.fbastard.com
2013-05-19 08:26:55 PM  
1 votes:
I hope those boxes are not from amazon...
2013-05-19 08:24:05 PM  
1 votes:

7th Son of a 7th Son: South Tulsa here, doesn't look like anything major's going to hit us.


So far, everything is dying as it crosses the river (like always).  Tulsa may not get any rain at all.
2013-05-19 08:23:44 PM  
1 votes:

phrawgh: One question. When did Oklahoma legalize gay marriage and marijuana?


you got it backwards; Stoops and Weiss insulted Nicky Sataan.
2013-05-19 08:20:24 PM  
1 votes:

Minarets: http://kfor.com/on-air/live-streaming/

KFOR is possibly about to have a spotter drive through the damage path in Shawnee


They do have the right vehicles for the job:

i42.tinypic.com
2013-05-19 08:19:57 PM  
1 votes:
DUMBASS must have been watching RFD eat the original action area and the it reformed over his head. Dude they teach that shiat in Skywarn class. what the serious fark,
2013-05-19 08:19:15 PM  
1 votes:

Dilvias: Fatalities reported at trailer park.


Alright who the hell is stupid enough to stay in a trailer park on a day like today...oh, right.
/Hope the causalities are low.
2013-05-19 08:15:43 PM  
1 votes:
Winona County MN is now Tor warned.

http://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=mpx&wwa=tornado% 2 0warning">http://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=mpx&ww a=tornado%2 0warning
kth
2013-05-19 08:14:56 PM  
1 votes:
Uh oh. TWC just showed us.  That's not a good sign. KC area.
2013-05-19 08:14:54 PM  
1 votes:
Wow that mobile home park got slammed
2013-05-19 08:12:03 PM  
1 votes:

AverageAmericanGuy: Because Topeka needs one real bad.


June, 1966, Topeka.
upload.wikimedia.org
2013-05-19 08:05:45 PM  
1 votes:

AverageAmericanGuy: Dear God,

Please send that tornado a bit northeastern and hit Topeka instead.


So... um... I have to ask: if there is a God, and if he has total control over the weather, and chooses to exercise it, and he can hear your prayers, and chooses to give you what you want ... why wouldn't you ask for no tornado?
2013-05-19 08:04:32 PM  
1 votes:
THE OFFICIAL STATE BIRD OF KANSAS

4.bp.blogspot.com
2013-05-19 07:59:19 PM  
1 votes:

Epiphany: thisisyourbrainonFark: Epiphany: /this shiat will pre-empt the Celebrity Apprentice finale, damn't.

Truly an unspeakable tragedy.

Did I mention it's ALL STAR Celebrity Apprentice?

/just trying to tell some jokes, bad weather in this area of the country freaks me out


Sad thing is there was a Twitter outrage when The Bachelor got preempted for severe weather. Mostly a bunch of preppies pissed off that they were missing the season finale
2013-05-19 07:58:50 PM  
1 votes:
Most malls in tornado alley have shelters.  Also, their construction is a little more substantial than your typical stick house or mobile home.  Little to no windows, steel and concrete construction.  A 30 year old Sears might be the best place to ride one of these out.
2013-05-19 07:56:33 PM  
1 votes:

LlamaGirl: PacificaFitz: Here in Earthquake country we are shaking our heads wondering why people would want to live where this happens annually

Coz it's cheap and pretty and the people are nice.


but your entire lives get disrupted EVERY YEAR
2013-05-19 07:56:11 PM  
1 votes:
reports of multiple people ejected in cars off of I-40.. trauma units being called.
2013-05-19 07:53:23 PM  
1 votes:
Here in Earthquake country we are shaking our heads wondering why people would want to live where this happens annually
2013-05-19 07:52:06 PM  
1 votes:

Fark It: The only upside is that most mall stores are going to close around 6:00 on Sunday, and those that are open are going to be emptying out around this time.  If this was Saturday at around 2:00 it would be a lot worse....


Mayfest (Tulsa art festival thing) was also prematurely ended today due to the forecasts.
I imagine any complaints people had from it are gone by now.
2013-05-19 07:51:24 PM  
1 votes:
I just want to repeat, Reed Timmer and Jim Cantore are in the same vehicle, that pretty guaranteeing violent tornadoes today.
2013-05-19 07:50:00 PM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Multiple Vortices now..  Wow thats a monster.


My ex is on the telly?
2013-05-19 07:49:57 PM  
1 votes:
The only upside is that most mall stores are going to close around 6:00 on Sunday, and those that are open are going to be emptying out around this time.  If this was Saturday at around 2:00 it would be a lot worse....
2013-05-19 07:48:52 PM  
1 votes:
As a showing of solidarity I'll be F5ing this thread all evening.
2013-05-19 07:46:54 PM  
1 votes:

dletter: Shawnee, OK is about 30k, so, a decent size town.

The news 4 stream is announcing it is heading straight towards the "Shawnee Mall", about a 1/4-1/2 mile wide.   

Hope they have a good underground basement/parking garage there.


If they're shopping on the Sabbath, it is God's will.
2013-05-19 07:46:29 PM  
1 votes:
MSNBC just broke into regular programming with coverage of a tornado heading toward a mall in eastern OK. Shawnee I believe.
2013-05-19 07:44:44 PM  
1 votes:
Oh shiat, Reed Timmer is on the phone.  He's the Jim Cantore of tornadoes, the shiat is hitting the fan.
2013-05-19 07:38:20 PM  
1 votes:

Epiphany: mr intrepid: I remember we were traveling across country and stopped in Kansas for the night.  Eating dinner at a restaurant during a torrential downpour, we heard a tornado warning on the radio.  Waitress told us to pay it no mind.
A few minutes later, the wind kicked up and started going HORIZONTAL.

Got real quiet in there.

Oh yeah, we get Tornado watches and shiat all the time in Kansas. Even Tornado Warnings quite a bit throughout the summer. After hearing them so much you stop caring as much most of the time. Well normal, well adjusted people do. I'm all like "Beer, Basement, NOW"

I hope all the Oklahoma Farkers are ok, they look like there is a ridiculous amount of shiat there.


I used to get very nonchalant about tornado warnings because the issued them all of the time.  However, forecasting has greatly improved in the last 10 years and now that radar is much more precise, when they issue a tornado warning, it usually means that storm can or will produce a tornado at any minute.  I take them much more serious than I did 5-10 years ago.
2013-05-19 07:36:39 PM  
1 votes:

mrswood: the_rhino: Hopefully it will kill some retarded psycho Christians and tea tards.

That's terrible and not nice.


Hes the same jerkoff laughing about the casualty's from the tornadoes in Granbury this week. Everyone knows hes a soggy bag of dicks. Just ignore him.
2013-05-19 07:35:20 PM  
1 votes:

Current Resident: Mister Peejay: This. And I live in the safest part of the Midwest. We get no tornadoes, hurricanes (the tail of Sandy whipped us with some 60mph winds), earthquakes greater than about a 3.0, it doesn't get hotter than 100 or colder than 10... Not much rain, not much snow, not terribly much sun...

But on the other hand, it's Ohio...


I know, right?  There's literally no downsides.
2013-05-19 07:33:39 PM  
1 votes:

Matthew Keene: God-is-a-Taco: [i.imgur.com image 539x324]

This is that weatherwoman I was talking about earlier. I think I have a crush on her.

Yeah, I could see me enjoying an evening with her, me handcuffed and her booted foot on my neck.


The Weather Dominatrix?  I think that's only on TWC After Hours.
2013-05-19 07:32:48 PM  
1 votes:

mr intrepid: I remember we were traveling across country and stopped in Kansas for the night.  Eating dinner at a restaurant during a torrential downpour, we heard a tornado warning on the radio.  Waitress told us to pay it no mind.
A few minutes later, the wind kicked up and started going HORIZONTAL.

Got real quiet in there.


Man, horizontal wind?! That's like rain following  down.
2013-05-19 07:31:46 PM  
1 votes:

God-is-a-Taco: [i.imgur.com image 539x324]

This is that weatherwoman I was talking about earlier. I think I have a crush on her.


Yeah, I could see me enjoying an evening with her, me handcuffed and her booted foot on my neck.
2013-05-19 07:28:48 PM  
1 votes:

spidermilk: meyerkev: aevorea: "Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.

You've got to put it in perspective.

Tornados wipe out EVERYTHING in their path which is about 1 half mile wide and 10 miles long.
Hurricanes wipe out EVERYTHING in the state of New Jersey (or Florida or the Carolinas, etc).
Earthquakes wipe out EVERYTHING within N miles of their epicenter (and occasionally trigger tsunamis which wipe out entire COUNTRIES on the other side of the ocean).
Floods wipe out EVERYTHING that's within their floodplain which can be miles wide and hundreds or thousands of miles long.
Every once in a while, a really, really, really bad thunderstorm will roll through and knock down some power lines, and drop a branch on some people's roofs.

The midwest has it pretty good as far as "OH SHIAT weather goes"

Exactly. I live in the midwest and to be frank, tornadoes are scary but a big blizzard that knocks out power or a heat wave where people lose power is far more deadly.


Only because of our density.  Cram 7 million on an island a a few people will die if you have a light rain storm.

The difference is, if you are healthy and prepared, It's hard to die in a blizzard.  Don't drive.  Have food and water.  Stay warm.  Don't burn shiat inside to stay warm without proper ventilation.

But if a tornado decides to pick you up and dump your remains nd the remains of your house a half mile away, then there's nothing you can d.
2013-05-19 07:23:42 PM  
1 votes:

Matthew Keene: Large tornado just east of Norman, OK. Live coverage with Gary England on KWTV.  England, and James Spahn are weather GODS!!!

http://www.news9.com/Global/category.asp?C=207228&BannerId=988

Getting worse by the minute in that area.


That thing is MASSIVE
2013-05-19 07:22:12 PM  
1 votes:

JungleBoogie: And by "bumpy", subby means "terrifying and lethally dangerous."


As opposed to "Lethally Safe?"
2013-05-19 07:10:45 PM  
1 votes:
Large tornado just east of Norman, OK. Live coverage with Gary England on KWTV.  England, and James Spahn are weather GODS!!!

http://www.news9.com/Global/category.asp?C=207228&BannerId=988

Getting worse by the minute in that area.
2013-05-19 07:10:23 PM  
1 votes:

meyerkev: aevorea: "Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.

You've got to put it in perspective.

Tornados wipe out EVERYTHING in their path which is about 1 half mile wide and 10 miles long.
Hurricanes wipe out EVERYTHING in the state of New Jersey (or Florida or the Carolinas, etc).
Earthquakes wipe out EVERYTHING within N miles of their epicenter (and occasionally trigger tsunamis which wipe out entire COUNTRIES on the other side of the ocean).
Floods wipe out EVERYTHING that's within their floodplain which can be miles wide and hundreds or thousands of miles long.
Every once in a while, a really, really, really bad thunderstorm will roll through and knock down some power lines, and drop a branch on some people's roofs.

The midwest has it pretty good as far as "OH SHIAT weather goes"


Exactly. I live in the midwest and to be frank, tornadoes are scary but a big blizzard that knocks out power or a heat wave where people lose power is far more deadly.

Of course I refuse to live in a house without a basement. Be safe Kansas-ians and Oklahomans. Tip from my Bridgeton family who had some neighbors get their homes destroyed a few years ago: When you go downstairs, grab your purse or wallet. Because if your home is destroyed and you have no ID, no nothing, it can be difficult to prove who you are to get your insurance benefits (or even if the police want to make sure those are your house ruins you are rooting around in). Plus if you can keep important documents (or copies of them) down there anyway... (if your basement is safe from flooding) that will help too.
2013-05-19 07:02:11 PM  
1 votes:
i.imgur.com

Dayum. Best wishes to all affected farkers. You guys be careful.
2013-05-19 06:58:51 PM  
1 votes:

aevorea: "Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.


You've got to put it in perspective.

Tornados wipe out EVERYTHING in their path which is about 1 half mile wide and 10 miles long.
Hurricanes wipe out EVERYTHING in the state of New Jersey (or Florida or the Carolinas, etc).
Earthquakes wipe out EVERYTHING within N miles of their epicenter (and occasionally trigger tsunamis which wipe out entire COUNTRIES on the other side of the ocean).
Floods wipe out EVERYTHING that's within their floodplain which can be miles wide and hundreds or thousands of miles long.
Every once in a while, a really, really, really bad thunderstorm will roll through and knock down some power lines, and drop a branch on some people's roofs.

The midwest has it pretty good as far as "OH SHIAT weather goes"
2013-05-19 06:53:09 PM  
1 votes:
g-ecx.images-amazon.com
2013-05-19 06:52:10 PM  
1 votes:

cheap_thoughts: This is my poor kitty Hank who rode the storm outside. He's all wet :-(


Is his face going to stay all blurry, or will he get better? :)
2013-05-19 06:49:58 PM  
1 votes:
The camera crew on the live feed just blew through a red light.  Do they get to do that?
2013-05-19 06:46:10 PM  
1 votes:

SCUBA_Archer: Is there such thing as an F5?


My keyboard goes all the way to F12.
2013-05-19 06:43:11 PM  
1 votes:
Goddamnit.

We have an office in Wichita. Every time they shut down, their traffic gets routed to us.

/Yeah, selfish bastard. Going to hell.
2013-05-19 06:42:28 PM  
1 votes:
Doooooom!!

Or the start of tornado season.

But, mostly doooooooom.

/ last time this happenes the amateur weather spotters actually caused more damage then the twister
2013-05-19 06:42:24 PM  
1 votes:
s22.postimg.org
2013-05-19 06:41:18 PM  
1 votes:
God hates the FARK out of red states.

/seriously, be safe and get the fark underground or hold a mattress over your head or do whatever the fark you do in a place where storms knock down buildings
2013-05-19 06:38:52 PM  
1 votes:
This is news to me! I'm currently in Wichita and it's sunny!

/you're about 2 hours late
2013-05-19 06:38:25 PM  
1 votes:
The safest* place during a tornado is outside, in the middle of a field.


* Definition of safest may be twisted.
2013-05-19 06:38:14 PM  
1 votes:
It's not fun loading screaming animals into an underground tornado shelter. The storm passed over our house but the clouds definitely looked weird.
2013-05-19 06:33:25 PM  
1 votes:
If you ever get caught in the path of a tornado, drive your car on top of the highest hill possible, provided that it is under a bridge and attached to the outermost room in your house.  This will keep you safe if you are in the path of a tornado.
2013-05-19 06:28:47 PM  
1 votes:
i40.tinypic.com
2013-05-19 05:59:25 PM  
1 votes:

2xhelix: OKC news has a helicopter tracking a 1/2 mile wide and growing tornado now. http://kfor.com/on-air/live-streaming/


Weather Channel is showing that, and Cantore is with Reed Timmer following it.
2013-05-19 05:56:56 PM  
1 votes:
OKC news has a helicopter tracking a 1/2 mile wide and growing tornado now. http://kfor.com/on-air/live-streaming/
2013-05-19 05:18:01 PM  
1 votes:
North OKC and Edmond getting hit now too
 
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