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(KWCH Wichita) NewsFlash Supercell with confirmed tornado bearing down on Wichita as severe weather outbreak begins in plains states. Hang tight Tornado Alley farkers, it's gonna be a bumpy evening. LGT live streaming vid   (kwch.com) divider line 613
    More: NewsFlash, severe weather, tornadoes, outbreaks  
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7405 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 May 2013 at 6:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»


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2013-05-19 10:38:05 PM

Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]


i99.photobucket.com

Me 2 days after May 31, 1985 OH/PA outbreak.  Niles, OH.  Former skating rink

And I figured Ohioans hadn't forgotten  Xenia.yet.
 
2013-05-19 10:38:48 PM

Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]


Unless you're in SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up
 
2013-05-19 10:39:00 PM

Bunny Deville: tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: [pbs.twimg.com image 600x900]

Nice (As it crossed I-40)

It's only nice because it's not going through a city at that moment. That also looks very much like the one going through Cullman Alabama's suburbs in 2011 (it was being shown live) before the power went out when one of the Nuke plants power lines got hit.

Yeah. The phone call I got after that happened was not fun. " So you know you guys aren't gonna have power for as long as a month."


I was lucky and just decided to go to Georgia where they had power. That was a mess though. I got to see the damage in Guntersville and all along HWY 79 to Centre it was a mess hate to think what Gadsden was like that day. That was something I hope I don't see again, but probably will.
 
2013-05-19 10:40:03 PM

wxboy: 2.8 magnitude earthquake NE of Shawnee, about an hour ago.


Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-05-19 10:45:59 PM

RagnarD: Me 2 days after May 31, 1985 OH/PA outbreak.


I have a vision of that Frogger arcade game hopping through the debris to safety.
 
2013-05-19 10:46:07 PM

RagnarD: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

[i99.photobucket.com image 500x600]

Me 2 days after May 31, 1985 OH/PA outbreak.  Niles, OH.  Former skating rink

And I figured Ohioans hadn't forgotten  Xenia.yet.


Plug it in and get the high score
 
2013-05-19 10:46:57 PM
Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.
 
2013-05-19 10:49:09 PM

God-is-a-Taco: Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.


More sensitive recording equipment.
 
2013-05-19 10:50:05 PM

Mrtraveler01: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

Unless you're in SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up


The storm you are talking about was April 4th, 1974.

And no, we won't forget it. I can't, I have a scar on my shoulder from it, (well, the same storm line, twister #44 that day... the Xenia twister was #37 )

That outbreak started in Illinois on the 3rd, but by the end of the 4th there were tornadoes in 13 states and one Canadian province.

/The farm that my family lived on was hit hard that day, and to this day you can walk through the field and find pieces of wood and ceramic chunks of insulators from power lines.
 
2013-05-19 10:52:51 PM

Minarets: tinfoil-hat maggie: Minarets: Shiat.  Looks like we are up for another round tomorrow.

Sorry, best of luck and stay safe.

May not be as bad as today.  Severe storms w/ tornado potential.

Insurance verification card from Shawnee found in Tulsa.


50-60% chance for Central OK tomorrow according to...accuweather? NWS? Hell if I can remember. Whoever does that deal where they rate it on a 1-10 scale then tells you to multiply the 1-10 by ten. Today was a 6-7 for Central OK on that site, so keep your kit packed, your animal crates ready, your phones charged, and make sure you've got batteries for flashlights.
 
2013-05-19 10:55:22 PM

God-is-a-Taco: Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.


Well there's that but New Madrid is just farther east of there and 1-3 magnitude earthquakes are pretty common everywhere.
/Although it is interesting since there's an upper level low in the area.
 
2013-05-19 10:56:37 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: AbbeySomeone: ariseatex: Matthew Keene: God-is-a-Taco: Seattle has that problem as well, although it's mostly in regards to a tsunami from an offshore one.

I'd like to shake the hand of any tsunami that could make two right turns to get into Puget Sound to affect downtown Seattle.

It's much easier than you think.  The underwater geography is such that it would easily channel and amplify any tsunami that did come in.

There's also concern from an earthquake causing a Whidbey Island (or a similar Sound Island) rockfall creating a massive wave in itself.

/minored in rocks for jocks at UW-Seattle
//also, I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
///slashies come in threes

This and the fault line activity and volcanoes. Rainier is out my back window.
Path of the lahar, etc.

So were you saying earlier Rainer is getting twitchy? I sorta saw your earlier post but was watching immediate storm stuff. Or just at anytime it could?


Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...
 
2013-05-19 10:57:21 PM
THERE'S A SALE AT PENNY'S!
 
2013-05-19 11:00:56 PM

Thingster: God-is-a-Taco: Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.

More sensitive recording equipment.


I prefer my explanation... ;^)

BTW, can one even feel a 2.8?
 
2013-05-19 11:02:07 PM

Shadow Blasko: The farm that my family lived on was hit hard that day, and to this day you can walk through the field and find pieces of wood and ceramic chunks of insulators from power lines.


That's something I never thought about until I saw the damage at my Grandmothers house. That happened in '08 and you can walk the fields around where the house was and still find all kinds of bit's and pieces even though it's been swept for clean-up several times.
 
2013-05-19 11:04:26 PM

Stone Meadow: Thingster: God-is-a-Taco: Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.

More sensitive recording equipment.

I prefer my explanation... ;^)

BTW, can one even feel a 2.8?


Sometimes if you're close. Remember east of the Rockies the soil has a different composition and carries more vibration further.
/Hope I said that right.
 
2013-05-19 11:05:10 PM

Aigoo: tinfoil-hat maggie: AbbeySomeone: ariseatex: Matthew Keene: God-is-a-Taco: Seattle has that problem as well, although it's mostly in regards to a tsunami from an offshore one.

I'd like to shake the hand of any tsunami that could make two right turns to get into Puget Sound to affect downtown Seattle.

It's much easier than you think.  The underwater geography is such that it would easily channel and amplify any tsunami that did come in.

There's also concern from an earthquake causing a Whidbey Island (or a similar Sound Island) rockfall creating a massive wave in itself.

/minored in rocks for jocks at UW-Seattle
//also, I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
///slashies come in threes

This and the fault line activity and volcanoes. Rainier is out my back window.
Path of the lahar, etc.

So were you saying earlier Rainer is getting twitchy? I sorta saw your earlier post but was watching immediate storm stuff. Or just at anytime it could?

Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...


IIRC, Rainier is overdue for a big eruption and has been for a while.

/And when that goes off, it'll  be St. Helens except close enough to wipe out Seattle from the Lahar flow.
//They've got a big map on the floor of the Visitors Center that basically boils down to: "These people are totally screwed and everyone else is only probably screwed."
///Mountain View near the Bay Area, so when the "Big One" hits, I'm trapped deep enough inside the Valley that getting out will be impossible.
 
2013-05-19 11:09:36 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Shadow Blasko: The farm that my family lived on was hit hard that day, and to this day you can walk through the field and find pieces of wood and ceramic chunks of insulators from power lines.

That's something I never thought about until I saw the damage at my Grandmothers house. That happened in '08 and you can walk the fields around where the house was and still find all kinds of bit's and pieces even though it's been swept for clean-up several times.


There were (and are again) a set of those big transmission main towers on the farm property. 4 of them were were hit by the tornado. So, there are something like 16 sets if insulators on each side, with 8 big ceramic disks on each insulator... Every time we plowed some of them would find their way to the surface.

The field was last plowed (when my grandfather sold the farm) in 98, and his big box of "tornado stuff" was still in the tool shed.

Amazing how long hubcaps will stay in a tree if no one cares to go up there and get them.
 
2013-05-19 11:11:18 PM

Aigoo: Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...


I mean I know it's an active volcano and if I lived nearby I would probably have learned a lot more vulcanology, but I mean like anything out of the norm, granted that doesn't mean anything. Just like a year or more ago there was a 5(?) magnitude on a fault near the New Madrid did that mean anything well it hasn't yet but it was different.
 
2013-05-19 11:11:36 PM

RagnarD: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

[i99.photobucket.com image 500x600]

Me 2 days after May 31, 1985 OH/PA outbreak.  Niles, OH.  Former skating rink


I was there too, probably the same age.
Disaster must follow me.
 
2013-05-19 11:13:14 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Aigoo: Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...

I mean I know it's an active volcano and if I lived nearby I would probably have learned a lot more vulcanology, but I mean like anything out of the norm, granted that doesn't mean anything. Just like a year or more ago there was a 5(?) magnitude on a fault near the New Madrid did that mean anything well it hasn't yet but it was different.


There is apparently a more dangerous fault line north of New Madrid that is called the Wasatch if I recall correctly.

Either way, when either one of them lets go it will be the end of Memphis and most of St Louis, and will cause massive damage as far away as Chicago and Columbus
 
2013-05-19 11:15:09 PM

God-is-a-Taco: [i.imgur.com image 539x324]

This is that weatherwoman I was talking about earlier. I think I have a crush on her.


This is Colleen Coyle from WFAA in Dallas. She could share my shelter any time.
i158.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-19 11:16:14 PM
How stupid would you have to be to turn into tornado alley?  Is it not clearly marked or something?
 
2013-05-19 11:22:58 PM

trappedspirit: How stupid would you have to be to turn into tornado alley?  Is it not clearly marked or something?


Even Mig Alley was clearly marked!

www.airforcemag.com
 
2013-05-19 11:27:15 PM

Mrtraveler01: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

Unless you're in anywhere in the lower Ohio Valley including SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's Super Outbreak of April 1974 is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up


Minor corrections, as you were a bit lazy to look it up and, well, I live in the Ohio River Tornado Alleys and have relatives who live pretty much in that rough area of Ohio. :D

For those unaware--modern storm research acknowledges at least five major "Tornado Alleys", including not only the well-known "Traditional Tornado Alley" but smaller "tornado alleys" in Florida and North Carolina as well as (relevant to our interests re superoutbreaks) Dixie Alley (stretching across roughly the non-coastal parts of the former Confederacy) and Hoosier Alley (covering largely Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and the eastern half of Missouri).  Some researchers combine the Dixie and Hoosier Alleys (due to the fact there is some significant overlap in the Ohio Valley) and the Joplin, MO tornado occured in an area considered an "overlap" region between "Traditional Tornado Alley" and Hoosier Alley.

Of particular note, whilst Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley don't have quite the yearly volume of "Traditional Tornado Alley", there is a considerably larger-than-average rate of strong-to-violent tornadoes (EF3 and above) compared to "Traditional Tornado Alley", a higher percentage of killer tornadoes (though this may be partly due to mobile homes being more common in Dixie Alley in particular), and the area does have the tendency to throw out not only superoutbreaks with both derecho-spawned and supercell-spawned tornado activity (both the original 1974 Super Outbreak and the 2011 Mega Outbreak) had their primary regions of tornadogenesis in the Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley regions) but also tend to spawn some long-track tornadoes (the longest and most deadly tornado ever recorded in the US, the Tri-State Tornado, was a typical Hoosier Alley long-track tornado; researchers had wondered whether this was a true extra-long-track tornado (of EF5 levels of violence along most of its path) or a series of multiple touchdowns, but consensus is starting to lean back to the Tri-State Tornado just being an exceptionally bad Hoosier Alley long-tracker).

Cincy and Dayton are, much like Joplin (and much like Brandenburg and Louisville and a number of other cities in the Lower Ohio Valley) right on the overlap region between two areas of tornadogenesis (Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley (for those who consider them two different Tornado Alleys) for a lot of areas along the Ohio River, Traditional Tornado Alley and Hoosier Alley in the case of Joplin).  It's not a huge shocker that they tend to get a lot of tornadoes and some fairly nasty ones.

As for Xenia...yes, they got hit pretty bad in 1974, and part of why it's so historic is because measurements from there (and Brandenburg, which seems to get a part of it hoovered regularly in tornadic weather--particularly nastily in Super Outbreak the First) helped establish the Fujita Scale in estimates of tornadic wind speeds based on damage (needless to say, the EF scale tweaked things considerably, as it was found that the original F scale tended to overestimate wind speeds...of course, it took VORTEX teams to actually measure the wind speed in a tornado to find this out).  It was also the Super Outbreak where the destructive potentials of microbursts and derechos were found (yes, there was a lot of non-tornadic wind damage from that storm).  Have a few relatives that lived not hugely far from Xenia (up in Urbana) and even a good ten years after the storm there were still parts of Xenia that hadn't yet been rebuilt...

And whilst we're on the subject of the Midwest supposedly being safe from natural disasters--those of us who live in the Hoosier Alley/Dixie Alley confluence get ALL the natural disasters except for volcanoes (and the only reason we don't get THOSE is that the rift valley that created the New Madrid and Wabash fault zones was a failed rift...there's still enough of a hot-spot in the crust in the Ozarks to fuel the hot springs around a certain eponymous town in Arkansas, though).  Earthquakes?  Yup, two major fault zones overdue for major quakes (New Madrid being the more famous one, Wabash being potentially just as dangerous) which are the only ones outside of Alaska to have ever caused XII damage on the Modified Mercalli Scale (basically to earthquakes what the EF scale is to tornadoes, a way to measure damage) and which created a series of lakes in Kentucky and Tennessee and Missouri from what amounted to riverine tsunamis that actually changed the course of the Mississippi and lowest Ohio Rivers...oh, and even a seven-pointer would LEVEL this part of the country between the ground being karst (and thus able to transmit quake waves easily) and earthquake-resistant building codes generally being nonexistent before about fifteen years ago (and a whole lot of stuff has NOT been retrofitted...including at least some bridges).  Hurricanes?  Yes, we actually tend to get at least one hurricane a year up the Ohio River Valley at least at Category 1 strength, sometimes Category 2 (we don't get formal hurricane warnings, of course, but we do get the winds and the rain).  Floods?  Yup.  Wildfires?  Yes, sometimes, in drought years (a bit more common in Appalachia, but not unknown to get grass fires and forest fires even close to Louisville in a bad drought year).   Fukushima-style NuclearDisasterGeddon?  Hasn't happened YET, but it's fairly safe to say that Paducah is Well and Truly Farked when New Madrid and/or Wabash blow or if a tornado hits the Wrong Damn Plant, seeing as they've got the only national plant for uranium enrichment for nuclear reactors just outside of town (yes, whilst there are no nuclear plants in KY, we enrich all the fuel for them).  Bonus: It'd also be a nasty chemical disaster, as their enrichment facilities are basically centrifuges for uranium hexaflouride, and the groundwater around the plant is ALREADY contaminated with technetium-99 to the point the Department of Energy provides drinking and washing water to houses and businesses nearby at no cost.
 
2013-05-19 11:34:17 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: God-is-a-Taco: Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.

Well there's that but New Madrid is just farther east of there and 1-3 magnitude earthquakes are pretty common everywhere.
/Although it is interesting since there's an upper level low in the area.


This WOULD be an interesting corrolation...seeing as (and this is actually fairly rarely even mentioned in reports) Louisville, KY had not only EF4 tornadoes go through on 3 April 1974 but (shortly after the tornadic storms hit) actually had a 5.0 earthquake on the Richter scale (specifically, a quake along a fault in New Albany, Indiana known to be a part of the Wabash Fault system and known for throwing a 5-pointer about every ten years or so).  Actually caused some real concern of additional damage to the Louisville water treatment plant, as its containment tanks had already suffered tornado damage (and the combo of tornado and earthquake damage actually caused a water rationing order for a few days).

Heck, I didn't know about the Louisville quake after the tornado until I found an MP3 of archived footage from WHAS-AM recorded that day (where the earthquake was specifically mentioned)...

Frankly I'm hoping it's just coincidental; I'll freely admit that my personal Disaster Nightmare Fuel would be an EF4 or EF5 tornado followed shortly after by New Madrid or the Wabash Fault system throwing a seven- or eight-pointer. :P
 
2013-05-19 11:36:16 PM

Great Porn Dragon: Mrtraveler01: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

Unless you're in anywhere in the lower Ohio Valley including SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's Super Outbreak of April 1974 is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up

Minor corrections, as you were a bit lazy to look it up and, well, I live in the Ohio River Tornado Alleys and have relatives who live pretty much in that rough area of Ohio. :D

For those unaware--modern storm research acknowledges at least five major "Tornado Alleys", including not only the well-known "Traditional Tornado Alley" but smaller "tornado alleys" in Florida and North Carolina as well as (relevant to our interests re superoutbreaks) Dixie Alley (stretching across roughly the non-coastal parts of the former Confederacy) and Hoosier Alley (covering largely Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and the eastern half of Missouri).  Some researchers combine the Dixie and Hoosier Alleys (due to the fact there is some significant overlap in the Ohio Valley) and the Joplin, MO tornado occured in an area considered an "overlap" region between "Traditional Tornado Alley" and Hoosier Alley.

Of particular note, whilst Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley don't have quite the yearly volume of "Traditional Tornado Alley", there is a considerably larger-than-average rate of strong-to-violent tornadoes (EF3 and above) compared to "Traditional Tornado Alley", a higher percentage of killer tornadoes (though this may be partly due to mobile homes being more common in Dixie Alley in particular), and the area does have the tendency to throw out not only superoutbreaks with both derecho-spawned and supercell-spawned tornado activity (both the original 1974 Super Outbreak and the 2011 Mega Outbreak) had their primary regions of tornadogenesis in the Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley regions) but also tend to spawn some long-track tornadoes (the longest and most deadly tornado ever recorded in the US, the Tri-State Tornado, was a typical Hoosier Alley long-track tornado; researchers had wondered whether this was a true extra-long-track tornado (of EF5 levels of violence along most of its path) or a series of multiple touchdowns, but consensus is starting to lean back to the Tri-State Tornado just being an exceptionally bad Hoosier Alley long-tracker).

Cincy and Dayton are, much like Joplin (and much like Brandenburg and Louisville and a number of other cities in the Lower Ohio Valley) right on the overlap region between two areas of tornadogenesis (Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley (for those who consider them two different Tornado Alleys) for a lot of areas along the Ohio River, Traditional Tornado Alley and Hoosier Alley in the case of Joplin).  It's not a huge shocker that they tend to get a lot of tornadoes and some fairly nasty ones.

As for Xenia...yes, they got hit pretty bad in 1974, and part of why it's so historic is because measurements from there (and Brandenburg, which seems to get a part of it hoovered regularly in tornadic weather--particularly nastily in Super Outbreak the First) helped establish the Fujita Scale in estimates of tornadic wind speeds based on damage (needless to say, the EF scale tweaked things considerably, as it was found that the original F scale tended to overestimate wind speeds...of course, it took VORTEX teams to actually measure the wind speed in a tornado to find this out).  It was also the Super Outbreak where the destructive potentials of microbursts and derechos were found (yes, there was a lot of non-tornadic wind damage from that storm).  Have a few relatives that lived not hugely far from Xenia (up in Urbana) and even a good ten years after the storm there were still parts of Xenia that hadn't yet been rebuilt...

And whilst we're on the subject of the Midwest supposedly being safe from natural disasters--those of us who live in the Hoosier Alley/Dixie Alley confluence get ALL the natural disasters except for volcanoes (and the only reason we don't get THOSE is that the rift valley that created the New Madrid and Wabash fault zones was a failed rift...there's still enough of a hot-spot in the crust in the Ozarks to fuel the hot springs around a certain eponymous town in Arkansas, though).  Earthquakes?  Yup, two major fault zones overdue for major quakes (New Madrid being the more famous one, Wabash being potentially just as dangerous) which are the only ones outside of Alaska to have ever caused XII damage on the Modified Mercalli Scale (basically to earthquakes what the EF scale is to tornadoes, a way to measure damage) and which created a series of lakes in Kentucky and Tennessee and Missouri from what amounted to riverine tsunamis that actually changed the course of the Mississippi and lowest Ohio Rivers...oh, and even a seven-pointer would LEVEL this part of the country between the ground being karst (and thus able to transmit quake waves easily) and earthquake-resistant building codes generally being nonexistent before about fifteen years ago (and a whole lot of stuff has NOT been retrofitted...including at least some bridges).  Hurricanes?  Yes, we actually tend to get at least one hurricane a year up the Ohio River Valley at least at Category 1 strength, sometimes Category 2 (we don't get formal hurricane warnings, of course, but we do get the winds and the rain).  Floods?  Yup.  Wildfires?  Yes, sometimes, in drought years (a bit more common in Appalachia, but not unknown to get grass fires and forest fires even close to Louisville in a bad drought year).   Fukushima-style NuclearDisasterGeddon?  Hasn't happened YET, but it's fairly safe to say that Paducah is Well and Truly Farked when New Madrid and/or Wabash blow or if a tornado hits the Wrong Damn Plant, seeing as they've got the only national plant for uranium enrichment for nuclear reactors just outside of town (yes, whilst there are no nuclear plants in KY, we enrich all the fuel for them).  Bonus: It'd also be a nasty chemical disaster, as their enrichment facilities are basically centrifuges for uranium hexaflouride, and the groundwater around the plant is ALREADY contaminated with technetium-99 to the point the Department of Energy provides drinking and washing water to houses and businesses nearby at no cost.


You forgot the VX nerve gas storage and destruction facilty in Richmond KY.
 
2013-05-19 11:37:33 PM

Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: Aigoo: Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...

I mean I know it's an active volcano and if I lived nearby I would probably have learned a lot more vulcanology, but I mean like anything out of the norm, granted that doesn't mean anything. Just like a year or more ago there was a 5(?) magnitude on a fault near the New Madrid did that mean anything well it hasn't yet but it was different.

There is apparently a more dangerous fault line north of New Madrid that is called the Wasatch if I recall correctly.

Either way, when either one of them lets go it will be the end of Memphis and most of St Louis, and will cause massive damage as far away as Chicago and Columbus


Most of the towns and cities of the Mississippi River Valley will fair poorly due to the old brick construction, at least from what I hear some bridges and things are being retrofitted. If there's a big one along any of the old fault lines, and I'm guessing there are still some undiscovered ones.

Also to the California earthquake savey farkers do y'all have sand geysers during your earthquakes? Those were reported during the 1800's quakes.

Oh and Shadow Blasko my grandmothers house the walls remained up since it wasn't a direct hit but there were all kinds of bits and pieces stuck in one of the outer walls
/Granted lost most of the roof and the house actually twisted on it's foundation so it was totaled
//3 people lost their lives in that storm back in 2008 their houses were leveled to the foundation.
///Organically it was classified an EF3 but later upgraded to EF4
//amazing seeing the destruction along it's path
/I really do feel for the people today and what they now have to go through
 
2013-05-19 11:43:23 PM

Great Porn Dragon: Mrtraveler01: Shadow Blasko: Begoggle: [24.media.tumblr.com image 400x258]

Meanwhile in Ohio...

/Moved from Norman, OK the day after the F4 hit in 2003

Totally safe here

[i.imgur.com image 287x261]

Unless you're in anywhere in the lower Ohio Valley including SW Ohio near Dayton or Cincinnati. Then you're screwed.

/Tornado in Xenia, OH back in the 1960's Super Outbreak of April 1974 is still considered historic by meteorologists
//Although to be fair, I think the outbreak started in Indiana which does get its share of tornadoes.
///too lazy to look it up

Minor corrections, as you were a bit lazy to look it up and, well, I live in the Ohio River Tornado Alleys and have relatives who live pretty much in that rough area of Ohio. :D

For those unaware--modern storm research acknowledges at least five major "Tornado Alleys", including not only the well-known "Traditional Tornado Alley" but smaller "tornado alleys" in Florida and North Carolina as well as (relevant to our interests re superoutbreaks) Dixie Alley (stretching across roughly the non-coastal parts of the former Confederacy) and Hoosier Alley (covering largely Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and the eastern half of Missouri).  Some researchers combine the Dixie and Hoosier Alleys (due to the fact there is some significant overlap in the Ohio Valley) and the Joplin, MO tornado occured in an area considered an "overlap" region between "Traditional Tornado Alley" and Hoosier Alley.

Of particular note, whilst Hoosier Alley and Dixie Alley don't have quite the yearly volume of "Traditional Tornado Alley", there is a considerably larger-than-average rate of strong-to-violent tornadoes (EF3 and above) compared to "Traditional Tornado Alley", a higher percentage of killer tornadoes (though this may be partly due to mobile homes being more common in Dixie Alley in particular), and the area does have the tendency to throw out not only superoutbreaks with both derecho-spawned and supercell-spawned tornado activ ...


There is nothing minor about these corrections...
 
2013-05-19 11:47:49 PM

Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: Aigoo: Rainier was twitchy years ago when I lived there...

I mean I know it's an active volcano and if I lived nearby I would probably have learned a lot more vulcanology, but I mean like anything out of the norm, granted that doesn't mean anything. Just like a year or more ago there was a 5(?) magnitude on a fault near the New Madrid did that mean anything well it hasn't yet but it was different.

There is apparently a more dangerous fault line north of New Madrid that is called the Wasatch if I recall correctly.

Either way, when either one of them lets go it will be the end of Memphis and most of St Louis, and will cause massive damage as far away as Chicago and Columbus


Wabash Fault system, of which parts extend into Indiana (the fault system in New Albany that causes a 5-pointer about every ten years in the Louisville metro is considered basically the easternmost extension of that fault system)--and it's considered more dangerous because it's part of the same failed rift that birthed New Madrid but we know a lot less about it (as I understand it, seismologists are just now starting to really study the seismic history of the Wabash Fault system seeing as it was really only recognised as a threat a few years back).

I myself would argue that probably the most dangerous fault system in the US isn't New Madrid or Wabash, though--try the Cascadia fault system along the coast of Washington and British Columbia (that one throws Fukushima/Boxing Day Tsunami level 9.0+ about every three hundred years or so, and is overdue; there's also some VERY real concern that when Cascadia blows (and pretty much wipes Seattle, Bellingham, and Vancouver off the map) that it could trigger ALL the Three Sisters and add Hot Lava Doom along with the Tsunami Doom and Earthquake Doom and Half-Of-Seattle-Sliding-Into-The-Freaking-Pacific-Because-Said-Half-Is -Built-On-Landfill-That-In-A-Quake-Turns-To-The-Consistency-Of-The-Ave rage-Passengers-Liquishiats-During-A-Rotavirus-Fueled-Carnival-Lines-P oop-Cruise Doom).

(That last one, incidentially, is pretty much why everything from about Columbus west is farked when New Madrid and/or the Wabash Fault blows; karst land and areas with lots of rivers tend, shall we say, to liquefy in a good flood; a major earthquake would pretty much turn the Ohio Valley into a big farking jello bowl.)
 
2013-05-19 11:50:59 PM

Shadow Blasko: You forgot the VX nerve gas storage and destruction facilty in Richmond KY.


...yes, I did forget the VX (and other flavours of nerve gas and blistering agents) at the Bluegrass Repository in Richmond, thanks for reminding me of another of the 31 Flavours of Farked we really are here :D  (And yes, there HAVE been some real legitimate scares regarding the threat of a tornado strike to said chemical weapons storage and destruction facility.   Let's just say if a tornado hits it, a goodly chunk of the Lexington metro area gets to experience the human version of Raid bug spray. :P)
 
2013-05-19 11:52:53 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Stone Meadow:

BTW, can one even feel a 2.8?

Sometimes if you're close. Remember east of the Rockies the soil has a different composition and carries more vibration further.
/Hope I said that right.


IIRC, the land on the Right Coast is more "solid" than the land out here in California so that the energy from an earthquake propagates more efficiently on the Eastern portion of the US.  Here in California, the land has been broken up so many times from previous earthquakes that the energy dissipates very quickly.  Unless the earthquake is especially massive, you have to be quite close to the epicenter to feel it here in California.  The same can't be said for a similarly-sized earthquake on the other coast; there, a single quake can be felt for hundreds of miles around.
 
2013-05-19 11:54:53 PM

Great Porn Dragon: (That last one, incidentially, is pretty much why everything from about Columbus west is farked when New Madrid and/or the Wabash Fault blows; karst land and areas with lots of rivers tend, shall we say, to liquefy in a good flood; a major earthquake would pretty much turn the Ohio Valley into a big farking jello bowl.)


Yup yup...

People who don't live here just don't seem to understand how *different* the geology here is in regards to seismic wave propagation.

Hell, that 3.1 this week in Ottawa was felt very easily in Cincinnati. That's 750 miles... for a 3.1.

A 3.1 in California is barely noticeable more than 50 miles from the epicenter.
 
2013-05-19 11:56:34 PM

Great Porn Dragon: tinfoil-hat maggie: God-is-a-Taco: Stone Meadow:
Tornadoes? Earthquakes? You guys are farked...it's been nice knowing you!

Minor earthquakes aren't very rare any more. Fracking.

Well there's that but New Madrid is just farther east of there and 1-3 magnitude earthquakes are pretty common everywhere.
/Although it is interesting since there's an upper level low in the area.

This WOULD be an interesting corrolation...seeing as (and this is actually fairly rarely even mentioned in reports) Louisville, KY had not only EF4 tornadoes go through on 3 April 1974 but (shortly after the tornadic storms hit) actually had a 5.0 earthquake on the Richter scale (specifically, a quake along a fault in New Albany, Indiana known to be a part of the Wabash Fault system and known for throwing a 5-pointer about every ten years or so).  Actually caused some real concern of additional damage to the Louisville water treatment plant, as its containment tanks had already suffered tornado damage (and the combo of tornado and earthquake damage actually caused a water rationing order for a few days).

Heck, I didn't know about the Louisville quake after the tornado until I found an MP3 of archived footage from WHAS-AM recorded that day (where the earthquake was specifically mentioned)...

Frankly I'm hoping it's just coincidental; I'll freely admit that my personal Disaster Nightmare Fuel would be an EF4 or EF5 tornado followed shortly after by New Madrid or the Wabash Fault system throwing a seven- or eight-pointer. :P


That's pretty interesting and an odd coincidence, which I feel it should be called unless more data point's towards correlation. Although I have wondered about such things I got into reading about New Madrid again at one point looking for unusual weather, but all I found was accounts of Tecumseh seeing strange light's in the sky ( generally attributed to earthquake light's. but data on that part of the country at that time was sparse but it doesn't seem that there was abnormal rainfall or stormy weather. Granted it was just a passing fancy and looking at it closer could reveal more but December (I believe that's when the first New Madrid quake happened ) while it can have tornado's isn't known for them, granted plenty of other low pressure systems going on without the tornadoes.

/Sorry getting a bit tipsy : )
 
2013-05-19 11:56:52 PM

Great Porn Dragon: Shadow Blasko: You forgot the VX nerve gas storage and destruction facilty in Richmond KY.

...yes, I did forget the VX (and other flavours of nerve gas and blistering agents) at the Bluegrass Repository in Richmond, thanks for reminding me of another of the 31 Flavours of Farked we really are here :D  (And yes, there HAVE been some real legitimate scares regarding the threat of a tornado strike to said chemical weapons storage and destruction facility.   Let's just say if a tornado hits it, a goodly chunk of the Lexington metro area gets to experience the human version of Raid bug spray. :P)


Yeah... I'm quite surprised that there has not been a "Sy-Fy" movie ala "Atomic Twister" about what would happen if an EF5 went through that area.
 
2013-05-20 12:01:38 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Granted it was just a passing fancy and looking at it closer could reveal more but December (I believe that's when the first New Madrid quake happened )


There were 4 Big quakes and many aftershocks greater than 7.0 (up to 8.0) over a period of weeks.

It really must have seemed like the end of days....
 
2013-05-20 12:02:56 AM
And a message I'd like to generally send on behalf of Traditional Tornado Alley resident Farkers to $DEITY/$HAARP_Weather_Machine_Ctl/$Bored_Geek_In_11_Dimensional_Space_ Playing_4D_SimCity:

img.fark.net
 
2013-05-20 12:03:09 AM

FizixJunkee: tinfoil-hat maggie: Stone Meadow:

BTW, can one even feel a 2.8?

Sometimes if you're close. Remember east of the Rockies the soil has a different composition and carries more vibration further.
/Hope I said that right.

IIRC, the land on the Right Coast is more "solid" than the land out here in California so that the energy from an earthquake propagates more efficiently on the Eastern portion of the US.  Here in California, the land has been broken up so many times from previous earthquakes that the energy dissipates very quickly.  Unless the earthquake is especially massive, you have to be quite close to the epicenter to feel it here in California.  The same can't be said for a similarly-sized earthquake on the other coast; there, a single quake can be felt for hundreds of miles around.


Thank you for saying it better than I did.
 
2013-05-20 12:03:16 AM

shower_in_my_socks: SCUBA_Archer: Is there such thing as an F5?

My keyboard goes all the way to F12.


Oddly enough, the old Fujita (F-scale) actually did go all the way to F12, equivalent to Mach 1. F5 was simply the naturally-assumed extreme end of the spectrum since nothing that would be considered F6 and above had ever been observed.

i.imgur.com

For the nerds: the closest Kansas sounding this afternoon showed some impressive CAPE values near 5000 and 0-3km helicity around 250. Had a screenshot of the radar/storm velocity from the Wichita storm but got erased from my desktop somehow.
 
2013-05-20 12:08:00 AM

Shadow Blasko: Great Porn Dragon: (That last one, incidentially, is pretty much why everything from about Columbus west is farked when New Madrid and/or the Wabash Fault blows; karst land and areas with lots of rivers tend, shall we say, to liquefy in a good flood; a major earthquake would pretty much turn the Ohio Valley into a big farking jello bowl.)

Yup yup...

People who don't live here just don't seem to understand how *different* the geology here is in regards to seismic wave propagation.

Hell, that 3.1 this week in Ottawa was felt very easily in Cincinnati. That's 750 miles... for a 3.1.

A 3.1 in California is barely noticeable more than 50 miles from the epicenter.


I can confirm this.  Apparently, there have been dozens of 2-3 magnitude earthquakes more or less underneath my house, and I haven't felt anything since I moved to CA 4.5 months ago.

/My sister's in Ottawa.  I should probably say "Congrats on feeling an earthquake before your brother"
 
2013-05-20 12:13:07 AM

Shadow Blasko: tinfoil-hat maggie: Granted it was just a passing fancy and looking at it closer could reveal more but December (I believe that's when the first New Madrid quake happened )

There were 4 Big quakes and many aftershocks greater than 7.0 (up to 8.0) over a period of weeks.

It really must have seemed like the end of days....


To my understanding that is what the inhabitant's near the epicenter(s) thought. I mean strange light's in the sky(see Tecumseh, and he took it as time to free his people, see Fort Mims, 1812 Cherokee uprising) , then the quakes, river flows backwards floods towns, more and more quakes sand geysers blasting into the air. And people wonder why this is called the bible belt (only half kidding)
 
2013-05-20 12:14:14 AM
Move to where the tornadoes aren't and the food is.

/problem solved
 
2013-05-20 12:14:22 AM

Great Porn Dragon: And a message I'd like to generally send on behalf of Traditional Tornado Alley resident Farkers to $DEITY/$HAARP_Weather_Machine_Ctl/$Bored_Geek_In_11_Dimensional_Space_ Playing_4D_SimCity:

[img.fark.net image 275x142]


Thank you the last 2 years were enough.
 
2013-05-20 12:17:05 AM

ds_4815: shower_in_my_socks: SCUBA_Archer: Is there such thing as an F5?

My keyboard goes all the way to F12.

Oddly enough, the old Fujita (F-scale) actually did go all the way to F12, equivalent to Mach 1. F5 was simply the naturally-assumed extreme end of the spectrum since nothing that would be considered F6 and above had ever been observed.

[i.imgur.com image 426x558]

For the nerds: the closest Kansas sounding this afternoon showed some impressive CAPE values near 5000 and 0-3km helicity around 250. Had a screenshot of the radar/storm velocity from the Wichita storm but got erased from my desktop somehow.


Not a nerd, but that was interesting.
 
2013-05-20 12:21:14 AM

trappedspirit: Move to where the tornadoes aren't and the food is.

/problem solved


Ummmm....

Error in parsing for values "food" where value equals "is"
 
2013-05-20 12:26:05 AM

ds_4815: Oddly enough, the old Fujita (F-scale) actually did go all the way to F12, equivalent to Mach 1. F5 was simply the naturally-assumed extreme end of the spectrum since nothing that would be considered F6 and above had ever been observed.


I think I recall reading (and it has been some time) that the Greensburg Tornado might well have been an F6 if the EF scale had not been in use at that time.
 
2013-05-20 12:30:02 AM

ds_4815: Oddly enough, the old Fujita (F-scale) actually did go all the way to F12, equivalent to Mach 1. F5 was simply the naturally-assumed extreme end of the spectrum since nothing that would be considered F6 and above had ever been observed.


Yup--it was generally considered anything so extreme as to cause F6-level damage couldn't be determined just because F5 damage was that extreme.

To my knowledge, there is really only one tornado I've seen reports on that storm researchers even ha-ha-only-serious have stated "If there were an F6 tornado, these would qualify"--the Jarrell, TX tornado of 1997--and that was due to some pretty extreme reports of damage even for an F5 (cattle dismembered and even reports of cattle being eviscerated by winds, dogs actually skinned by the storm, reports of people being blown from the few basements in houses in that area and of house foundations being partially destroyed, actual full-on soil and sod removal to a depth of 18 inches, even cars being caught being so utterly destroyed that they were completely macerated and ground to small unrecognisable bits and in fact twelve vehicles were never found, such severe destruction of human remains that rescuers initially could not tell the difference between the remains of dead humans and dead animals, and so on).

Even with the extreme levels of damage with the Jarrell tornado (which frankly may well have even been unsurvivable even in a regular basement without a fortified tornado safe room--the Jarrell tornado actually managed to make the Joplin killer tornado look tame in comparison, and had it struck in a major metropolitan area instead of a sparsely populated suburb it would have caused a death toll that would easily exceed the Tri-State Twister and would reach well into the thousands of dead) it ultimately "only" received an F5 rating.  (Again, this is likely because of both Jarrell not being a major metro area AND a general reluctance to rate above F5 (officially encoded in the EF scale revision); now, if the Jarrell tornado had hit, say, downtown Dallas and completely razed a skyscraper or ten (and the Jarrell tornado DID completely raze very well-built concrete construction homes bolted to foundations and bedrock; at least one home completely "razed and wiped clean" by the Jarrell storm had walls two feet thick, hence the general judgement by storm experts that the Jarrell tornado was literally unsurvivable in anything short of a full-on underground nuclear bunker) that would probably safely have met the old "F6" criteria.)
 
2013-05-20 12:30:20 AM
Crap.. no . it was the Bridge Creek tornado.. not Greensburg.
 
2013-05-20 12:34:09 AM

Great Porn Dragon: To my knowledge, there is really only one tornado I've seen reports on that storm researchers even ha-ha-only-serious have stated "If there were an F6 tornado, these would qualify"--the Jarrell, TX tornado of 1997--and that was due to some pretty extreme reports of damage even for an F5 (cattle dismembered and even reports of cattle being eviscerated by winds, dogs actually skinned by the storm, reports of people being blown from the few basements in houses in that area and of house foundations being partially destroyed, actual full-on soil and sod removal to a depth of 18 inches, even cars being caught being so utterly destroyed that they were completely macerated and ground to small unrecognisable bits and in fact twelve vehicles were never found, such severe destruction of human remains that rescuers initially could not tell the difference between the remains of dead humans and dead animals, and so on).


You know, I used to think a lot of those old reports of horrifically mangled animals remains were just stories until after the Crittenden tornado last year.

I found a horse with other parts literally driven through it. What looked to be a strong leg bone had completely penetrated the horses cranial cavity. It was gruesome to say the least.
 
2013-05-20 12:35:55 AM

Great Porn Dragon: To my knowledge, there is really only one tornado I've seen reports on that storm researchers even ha-ha-only-serious have stated "If there were an F6 tornado, these would qualify"--the Jarrell, TX tornado of 1997--and that was due to some pretty extreme reports of damage even for an F5 (


And that kills my previous statement of "What if" F6 tornadoes.

Didn't Bridge Creek have 300MPH+ verified wind speeds?
 
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