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(KWCH Wichita) NewsFlash Supercell with confirmed tornado bearing down on Wichita as severe weather outbreak begins in plains states. Hang tight Tornado Alley farkers, it's gonna be a bumpy evening. LGT live streaming vid   (kwch.com) divider line 613
    More: NewsFlash, severe weather, tornadoes, outbreaks  
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7405 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 May 2013 at 6:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»


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2013-05-19 08:40:54 PM  
 
2013-05-19 08:41:01 PM  

jimmyjackfunk: Well I have lived in Oklahoma all my life and have been in several twisters (scariest are at night) wife is from Connecticut and after 11 when the sky gets dark and she says go I am loading up the dogs cats and kids and hauling ass to a safe spot. After they are safe is when I pull out the camera looking for funnels.


We don't get as many as y'all but here in 'Bama we get plenty and the big outbreak in 2011, and smaller one in 2012 was enough. Oh and in 2011 we lost power about 5 pm before the storms had gotten to us. So had no radar and trying to listen to the radio to track storms is not fun.
 
2013-05-19 08:41:14 PM  

LlamaGirl: PacificaFitz: so you guys say the same as us regarding earthquakes, "chances are we will be fine"

Yep!

Earthquakes scare me. Never been in one, never want to be in one.


Tornados and hurricanes are brutal but have a small degree of predictability. EQ's, not so much. i have been blessed to have been in all of these situations as well as the eruption of St. Helens in '80.
Eyeballing Mt. Rainier out my back window right now and checking seismic report.

yarly
 
2013-05-19 08:41:42 PM  

ariseatex: Better screencap from facebook


Is that.. pumpkins?
 
2013-05-19 08:41:47 PM  

Aigoo: So, I'm sorry; you were saying about tornadoes and how good we have it?


You are not Mississippi who gets Tornadoes AND Hurricanes or something like that.

/If you want to avoid severe weather move to Maine, lived in northern Maine for 15 years other than the occasional blizzard now big weather problems and you can prepare for for blizzards.
 
2013-05-19 08:41:52 PM  

JungleBoogie: I know trailer park residents are typically of limited financial means, but getting a trailer in tornado alley should also involve getting a small underground room that folks can jump into in case of severe weather. A simple, watertight, pre-fabricated box that goes into a hole next to the trailer.


Most parks have shelter buildings on site - pretty sure it's required in most states.
 
2013-05-19 08:42:12 PM  
 
2013-05-19 08:42:22 PM  

Bunny Deville: ariseatex: Better screencap from facebook

Is that.. pumpkins?


Boxes.
 
2013-05-19 08:42:47 PM  
For those who don't remember May 3rd 1999, it was a record breaking day for tornadoes in OK. Here's the radar of the hook echo. I hope we never have another day like that again.

www.mindspring.com
 
2013-05-19 08:42:52 PM  

LlamaGirl: PacificaFitz: Here in Earthquake country we are shaking our heads wondering why people would want to live where this happens annually

Coz it's cheap and pretty and the people are nice.


And there's no farking serious earthquakes to speak of. Plus fewer douchebags.

/Apparently, Hawaii is the safest state for natural disasters. Who knew?
 
2013-05-19 08:43:00 PM  

jimmyjackfunk: tinfoil-hat maggie: jimmyjackfunk: tinfoil-hat maggie: Dilvias: Fatalities reported at trailer park.

Alright who the hell is stupid enough to stay in a trailer park on a day like today...oh, right.
/Hope the causalities are low.

To be fair back in 11 when it came through Chickasha, we got out but that 24 year old girl was trying to help her disabled mother out when theirs got pancaked. Not saying she was stupid or stubborn but her mom wasn't very mobile.

That is sad, and you're right there can be outlaying circumstances.
/Was really just hoping this would pass with damage but little to no injuries.

Well I have lived in Oklahoma all my life and have been in several twisters (scariest are at night) wife is from Connecticut and after 11 when the sky gets dark and she says go I am loading up the dogs cats and kids and hauling ass to a safe spot. After they are safe is when I pull out the camera looking for funnels.


I've been here all my life.

I've never hunkered down except for the May 3,1999 tornado. I was living in Stroud and it was absolutely terrifying. I was in the bathtub with the mattress over my head. Will never forget that night.
 
2013-05-19 08:43:01 PM  
Getting nasty in KC.
 
2013-05-19 08:43:14 PM  

JungleBoogie: I know trailer park residents are typically of limited financial means, but getting a trailer in tornado alley should also involve getting a small underground room that folks can jump into in case of severe weather. A simple, watertight, pre-fabricated box that goes into a hole next to the trailer.


After 2011 they tried to pass a law but to many insurance company lawyers started screaming "liability" so they left it up to individual towns. Chickasha passed an ordinance that trailer parks and apartment complexes had to either install storm shelters or notify all residents and potential residents there was none. Guess which route my place took.

/$50 dollar sign lots cheaper than installing a shelter
 
2013-05-19 08:44:02 PM  
A friend of my son has been sending him updates from Mustang, OK where she moved several months. She's alright, but obviously scare to death.
 
2013-05-19 08:45:06 PM  

7th Son of a 7th Son: For those who don't remember May 3rd 1999, it was a record breaking day for tornadoes in OK. Here's the radar of the hook echo. I hope we never have another day like that again.

[www.mindspring.com image 511x632]


The echo over Carney earlier looked eerily similar.  A less populated area than what you show, I believe, but still frightening to see on radar.
 
2013-05-19 08:45:44 PM  

JungleBoogie: I know trailer park residents are typically of limited financial means, but getting a trailer in tornado alley should also involve getting a small underground room that folks can jump into in case of severe weather. A simple, watertight, pre-fabricated box that goes into a hole next to the trailer.


Actually, the problem is more a case of people not taking warnings seriously enough to move to the (ample) shelters in the area. Tbh, in Oklahoma, we hear the sirens and check the news to see where it is first. I heard sirens three times in one hour today and not one time did I take shelter. Why? I checked the radar and had news 9 on and knew the sirens were for the north side of town, several miles away (got a great photo via text from a buddy, though--one formed directly above the apartments I used to live in). Later, heard sirens from Moore and Norman--again, a few miles away--and didn't take shelter than either because the reports indicated the storms weren't moving my direction.

Some people don't even bother to do that much--watch the reports. They don't move until they can see/hear the storms and by then, it's too late. Thing is, when you live here and see this all the time, it doesn't freak you the fark out. It's like "oh, cool... oh shiat! It's headed this way, dammit!"
 
2013-05-19 08:45:46 PM  

JungleBoogie: I know trailer park residents are typically of limited financial means, but getting a trailer in tornado alley should also involve getting a small underground room that folks can jump into in case of severe weather. A simple, watertight, pre-fabricated box that goes into a hole next to the trailer.


They have those they cost around 10 grand installed, the trailer didn't cost much more than that.
 
kth
2013-05-19 08:46:39 PM  
We just got 70 mph straight lines in warrensburg. Power flickers. Power lines in trees, which are now on fire.
 
2013-05-19 08:46:53 PM  
This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.
 
2013-05-19 08:47:46 PM  

Aigoo: meyerkev: aevorea: "Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.

You've got to put it in perspective.

Tornados wipe out EVERYTHING in their path which is about 1 half mile wide and 10 miles long.
Hurricanes wipe out EVERYTHING in the state of New Jersey (or Florida or the Carolinas, etc).
Earthquakes wipe out EVERYTHING within N miles of their epicenter (and occasionally trigger tsunamis which wipe out entire COUNTRIES on the other side of the ocean).
Floods wipe out EVERYTHING that's within their floodplain which can be miles wide and hundreds or thousands of miles long.
Every once in a while, a really, really, really bad thunderstorm will roll through and knock down some power lines, and drop a branch on some people's roofs.

The midwest has it pretty good as far as "OH SHIAT weather goes"

Tell that to the Oklahomans who got hit by the Piedmont tornado two years ago. That farker was a mile wide and traveled 70 miles across Oklahoma.

Tell that to Joplin.

Tell it to the folks in Shawnee today. That was about a half mile to a mile wide at times and traveled over 40 miles. I watched it form and watched it travel its entire path and am currently watching the coverage of the entire swath of homes it utterly obliviated and the truck it picked up off the highway, slammed down on another highway, and the one known fatality.

So, I'm sorry; you were saying about tornadoes and how good we have it?


Having experienced three of those four disasters (and having spent the better of the afternoon in the basement of the Wichita Public Library), I can see his point.  All three are potentially devastating.  I would mark earthquakes as the worst simply because of their randomness and hurricanes as the least worst because you typically get a few days warning.  While tornadoes can be devastating, they can also be nothing.  Just look at this thread's headline.  "Supercell with confirmed tornado bearing down on Wichita" and yet the city reported not one injury.  You rarely hear of a "super" earthquake or hurricane that ends up leaving nobody injured.
 
2013-05-19 08:48:05 PM  

SomeOkieGirl: jimmyjackfunk: tinfoil-hat maggie: jimmyjackfunk: tinfoil-hat maggie: Dilvias: Fatalities reported at trailer park.

Alright who the hell is stupid enough to stay in a trailer park on a day like today...oh, right.
/Hope the causalities are low.

To be fair back in 11 when it came through Chickasha, we got out but that 24 year old girl was trying to help her disabled mother out when theirs got pancaked. Not saying she was stupid or stubborn but her mom wasn't very mobile.

That is sad, and you're right there can be outlaying circumstances.
/Was really just hoping this would pass with damage but little to no injuries.

Well I have lived in Oklahoma all my life and have been in several twisters (scariest are at night) wife is from Connecticut and after 11 when the sky gets dark and she says go I am loading up the dogs cats and kids and hauling ass to a safe spot. After they are safe is when I pull out the camera looking for funnels.

I've been here all my life.

I've never hunkered down except for the May 3,1999 tornado. I was living in Stroud and it was absolutely terrifying. I was in the bathtub with the mattress over my head. Will never forget that night.


That one kept me up until 2-3 in the Morning in Tulsa.  That storm produced a tornado in west Tulsa and the TV station was taking cover.  Crazy day.
 
2013-05-19 08:48:22 PM  

kth: We just got 70 mph straight lines in warrensburg. Power flickers. Power lines in trees, which are now on fire.


I'm assuming you're seeing this on TV & not out your window.  Unless your first reaction when watching a dangerous fire is to post about it on Fark.

/seriously, stay safe
 
2013-05-19 08:48:23 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: A friend of my son has been sending him updates from Mustang, OK where she moved several months. She's alright, but obviously scare to death.


Going through days like this can be scarey. It's a nasty lottery. really.
 
2013-05-19 08:48:47 PM  

rugman11: Aigoo: meyerkev: aevorea: "Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.

You've got to put it in perspective.

Tornados wipe out EVERYTHING in their path which is about 1 half mile wide and 10 miles long.
Hurricanes wipe out EVERYTHING in the state of New Jersey (or Florida or the Carolinas, etc).
Earthquakes wipe out EVERYTHING within N miles of their epicenter (and occasionally trigger tsunamis which wipe out entire COUNTRIES on the other side of the ocean).
Floods wipe out EVERYTHING that's within their floodplain which can be miles wide and hundreds or thousands of miles long.
Every once in a while, a really, really, really bad thunderstorm will roll through and knock down some power lines, and drop a branch on some people's roofs.

The midwest has it pretty good as far as "OH SHIAT weather goes"

Tell that to the Oklahomans who got hit by the Piedmont tornado two years ago. That farker was a mile wide and traveled 70 miles across Oklahoma.

Tell that to Joplin.

Tell it to the folks in Shawnee today. That was about a half mile to a mile wide at times and traveled over 40 miles. I watched it form and watched it travel its entire path and am currently watching the coverage of the entire swath of homes it utterly obliviated and the truck it picked up off the highway, slammed down on another highway, and the one known fatality.

So, I'm sorry; you were saying about tornadoes and how good we have it?

Having experienced three of those four disasters (and having spent the better of the afternoon in the basement of the Wichita Public Library), I can see his point.  All three are potentially devastating.  I would mark earthquakes as the worst simply because of their randomness and hurricanes as the least worst because you typically get a few days warning.  While tornadoes can be devastating, they can also be nothing.  Just look at this thread's headline.  "Supercell with confirmed tornado bearing down ...


Or at least it's not worth avoiding the Midwest just because of tornadoes.  Every area has its potential disaster, most of which are as bad (if not worse) than tornadoes.
 
2013-05-19 08:49:03 PM  

Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.


My brother lives in Cullman, there were some tense hours when we couldn't track him down.  The tornado made a turn one block before his neighborhood.
 
2013-05-19 08:49:39 PM  

Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.


man, i still have nightmare of that one.
/came close to being sucked into one
//f-0...but damn..
 
2013-05-19 08:50:28 PM  

ontariolightning: You havent been in a real blizzard if you can walk 5 feet in it.

So much this.  I will take a blizzard over tornadoes any day of the week.  If I am walking down the street during the middle of a blizzard I still stand a damned good chance of making it home alive.  Hell, if I am walking in a blizzard chances are that I am already within walking distance of my home and barring some freak accident I will make it home alive.  If I am walking down the street in the middle of a tornado, well, chances are I am not walking down the street any mo ...


Live in Chicago.  Grew up in Buffalo.  Lived in Finland.  I know what a real blizzard is.
 
2013-05-19 08:50:31 PM  

Tom_Slick: Aigoo: So, I'm sorry; you were saying about tornadoes and how good we have it?

You are not Mississippi who gets Tornadoes AND Hurricanes or something like that.

/If you want to avoid severe weather move to Maine, lived in northern Maine for 15 years other than the occasional blizzard now big weather problems and you can prepare for for blizzards.


Not complaining. I've been in every kind of natural event there is--including blizzards--except volcanic eruption (though I've lived on volcano evac routes). I'm simply pointing out that, no, the midwest doesn't have it "good" and that the loss of one's home and, especially, the loss of life is a tragedy. It doesn't matter how long the event lasts, destruction is destruction. I thought the original poster of the comment was a bit of a douche, considering the destruction of today's storms and the fact that there are entire neighborhoods destroyed and one confirmed death so far.
 
2013-05-19 08:51:22 PM  
They... they dropped me on my head. I can't help it.
 
2013-05-19 08:51:41 PM  
Aigoo:
So, I'm sorry; you were saying about tornadoes and how good we have it?

I'm back from windy weather (that was a weird "burst" of strong wind far away from the main storm..)

We do have it lucky. The odds of your house getting hit by a tornado of sufficient strength to harm or kill you are extremely small.
If you don't worry about getting hit by a meteorite on your drive to work, you shouldn't worry about a tornado hitting your very small location in an area the size of Tornado Alley.

Of course, we have earthquakes now because of fracking. Thanks, energy industry!
 
2013-05-19 08:51:47 PM  

Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.


Been wanting one myself, In Hunstville as well, I miss Dan Satterfeild. I think hes in OKC working for NWS now, he should be getting all kinds of excited.
 
kth
2013-05-19 08:51:48 PM  

ariseatex: kth: We just got 70 mph straight lines in warrensburg. Power flickers. Power lines in trees, which are now on fire.

I'm assuming you're seeing this on TV & not out your window.  Unless your first reaction when watching a dangerous fire is to post about it on Fark.

/seriously, stay safe


Scanner feed. If there was a fire I would not be playing with my phone.
 
2013-05-19 08:52:04 PM  

Tom_Slick: Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.

My brother lives in Cullman, there were some tense hours when we couldn't track him down.  The tornado made a turn one block before his neighborhood.


Yeah, we had one right down the street from our apartment. Of course, 1% of the land in AL was affected by a tornado that day, which is rather staggering. It's only 1%, but it's 1% of a pretty big area.

/we moved to a neighborhood that hasn't had one in recorded history
 
2013-05-19 08:52:07 PM  
Did ... did they just ignore a live shot of a tornado on the ground to go to a "wow look at the devastation in Carney" shot?
 
2013-05-19 08:52:38 PM  

kth: We just got 70 mph straight lines in warrensburg. Power flickers. Power lines in trees, which are now on fire.


yikes be careful!
 
2013-05-19 08:52:40 PM  

mr lawson: Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.

man, i still have nightmare of that one.
/came close to being sucked into one
//f-0...but damn..


Yikes :/
 
2013-05-19 08:53:14 PM  

tinfoil-hat maggie: Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.

Been wanting one myself, In Hunstville as well, I miss Dan Satterfeild. I think hes in OKC working for NWS now, he should be getting all kinds of excited.


He's in Delmarva now, but he still tracks stuff here and in OKC. I miss him too.
 
2013-05-19 08:53:28 PM  

rugman11: Aigoo: meyerkev: aevorea: "Let's move out to the Midwest," the boyfriend says. "Tornadoes aren't that bad," he says.

Yeah. F*ck that noise.

You've got to put it in perspective.

Tornados wipe out EVERYTHING in their path which is about 1 half mile wide and 10 miles long.
Hurricanes wipe out EVERYTHING in the state of New Jersey (or Florida or the Carolinas, etc).
Earthquakes wipe out EVERYTHING within N miles of their epicenter (and occasionally trigger tsunamis which wipe out entire COUNTRIES on the other side of the ocean).
Floods wipe out EVERYTHING that's within their floodplain which can be miles wide and hundreds or thousands of miles long.
Every once in a while, a really, really, really bad thunderstorm will roll through and knock down some power lines, and drop a branch on some people's roofs.

The midwest has it pretty good as far as "OH SHIAT weather goes"

Tell that to the Oklahomans who got hit by the Piedmont tornado two years ago. That farker was a mile wide and traveled 70 miles across Oklahoma.

Tell that to Joplin.

Tell it to the folks in Shawnee today. That was about a half mile to a mile wide at times and traveled over 40 miles. I watched it form and watched it travel its entire path and am currently watching the coverage of the entire swath of homes it utterly obliviated and the truck it picked up off the highway, slammed down on another highway, and the one known fatality.

So, I'm sorry; you were saying about tornadoes and how good we have it?

Having experienced three of those four disasters (and having spent the better of the afternoon in the basement of the Wichita Public Library), I can see his point.  All three are potentially devastating.  I would mark earthquakes as the worst simply because of their randomness and hurricanes as the least worst because you typically get a few days warning.  While tornadoes can be devastating, they can also be nothing.  Just look at this thread's headline.  "Supercell with confirmed tornado bearing down ...


True enough. And I admit, experiencing my first earthquake while driving scared the shiat out of me lol
 
2013-05-19 08:54:11 PM  
Allegedly the Welty cell is weakening maybe a little?
 
2013-05-19 08:55:25 PM  

Bunny Deville: tinfoil-hat maggie: Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.

Been wanting one myself, In Hunstville as well, I miss Dan Satterfeild. I think hes in OKC working for NWS now, he should be getting all kinds of excited.

He's in Delmarva now, but he still tracks stuff here and in OKC. I miss him too.


Oh cool, I learned so much about storms from watching him over the years.
 
2013-05-19 08:55:28 PM  

Mock26: ontariolightning: You havent been in a real blizzard if you can walk 5 feet in it.

So much this.  I will take a blizzard over tornadoes any day of the week.  If I am walking down the street during the middle of a blizzard I still stand a damned good chance of making it home alive.  Hell, if I am walking in a blizzard chances are that I am already within walking distance of my home and barring some freak accident I will make it home alive.  If I am walking down the street in the middle of a tornado, well, chances are I am not walking down the street any mo ...

Live in Chicago.  Grew up in Buffalo.  Lived in Finland.  I know what a real blizzard is.


People die in blizzards because they go outside. You could go outside to your car and get turned around and walk away from your house and freeze to death. It happens all of the time.
 
2013-05-19 08:55:34 PM  

ravenlore: Allegedly the Welty cell is weakening maybe a little?


That's what it looks like right now.   Earlier the storm relative velocity was showing bright red and bright green.  Now its different shades of green, so much less circulation, but it is still there.
 
2013-05-19 08:55:40 PM  

Bunny Deville: It's only 1%, but it's 1% of a pretty big area.


Per Wikipedia Alabama is 52,419 square miles, that mean 524 square miles were hit by tornadoes in some very populated areas of the state.  That is a lot.
 
2013-05-19 08:56:32 PM  

tinfoil-hat maggie: Bunny Deville: tinfoil-hat maggie: Bunny Deville: This situation is making me think of the April 27th tornadoes here in Alabama.

We're all sitting around talking about how maybe a real underground shelter would be a good investment.

Been wanting one myself, In Hunstville as well, I miss Dan Satterfeild. I think hes in OKC working for NWS now, he should be getting all kinds of excited.

He's in Delmarva now, but he still tracks stuff here and in OKC. I miss him too.

Oh cool, I learned so much about storms from watching him over the years.


Follow him on Facebook, he posts all sorts of science leaks.

I just wish he was still on WHNT so I could hear him talk about fraidy holes and frog stranglers.
 
2013-05-19 08:57:00 PM  
Getting seriously creeped out hearing "I-40" again and again, given that we live maybe half a mile north of I-40 -- fortunately for us, about 1200 miles east.

/don't know that our house-of-sticks would hold up much better than a trailer under that kind of wind
 
2013-05-19 08:57:13 PM  

LlamaGirl: PacificaFitz: so you guys say the same as us regarding earthquakes, "chances are we will be fine"

Yep!

Earthquakes scare me. Never been in one, never want to be in one.


Living in San Francisco Bay area I've felt the earth move more times than I can count.  The only one of note was 89 and I was just a kid, the thing about earthquakes is the first emotion is panic/fear and then when you realize the world didn't end there's a feeling of excitement.  We build for the big one now so there isn't much fear of them.
 
2013-05-19 08:58:10 PM  
"Any fatalities?"

"Confirm one. Repeat. Confirm one."

- Scanner feed.
 
2013-05-19 08:58:11 PM  
Do we have another feed for where the storms are at now?
 
2013-05-19 08:58:16 PM  
I know that the guy who owns the property our park is on came out to survey the damage but was more interested in the trailers he owned (we are buying not renting) and actually made the statement "there is no way a god damn tornado did all of this" of course he was from the left coast and only experienced the typical California stuff. The park manager had to get him out of harms way cause I think some folks were ready to form a lynch
mob
 
2013-05-19 08:59:34 PM  

Minarets: ravenlore: Allegedly the Welty cell is weakening maybe a little?

That's what it looks like right now.   Earlier the storm relative velocity was showing bright red and bright green.  Now its different shades of green, so much less circulation, but it is still there.


Yeah, it's not so far away from the radar site to blame rangefolding...
 
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