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(Mother Nature Network)   Does baking your own bread really save you some dough?   (mnn.com) divider line 34
    More: Interesting, baking, breads, gluten  
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737 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 19 May 2013 at 5:29 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-19 03:55:04 PM  
I'm baking brownies. Long night of drinking.
 
2013-05-19 05:01:33 PM  
Get a good sourdough starter and it won't matter if you're saving money after you taste it compared to the mass produced stuff the stores sell
 
2013-05-19 05:04:15 PM  

whyRpeoplesostupid: Get a good sourdough starter and it won't matter if you're saving money after you taste it compared to the mass produced stuff the stores sell


what's the prep time on something like that?
I am definitely interested in making my own bread.

/fyi, iPads are total shiat to type on
 
2013-05-19 05:09:59 PM  
Only if your time is worth nothing.
 
2013-05-19 05:15:27 PM  
Probably not... but the it makes the house smell amazing and I know exactly what 5 to 10 ingredients went into it.
 
2013-05-19 05:19:59 PM  
Not for the first 18 years.
 
2013-05-19 05:24:05 PM  

MadSkillz: whyRpeoplesostupid: Get a good sourdough starter and it won't matter if you're saving money after you taste it compared to the mass produced stuff the stores sell

what's the prep time on something like that?
I am definitely interested in making my own bread.

/fyi, iPads are total shiat to type on


I've never tried a sourdough, but baking a loaf of bread usually takes a few hours, though the bulk of that is just waiting for the dough to rise, and the bake tiself. The actual *work* of bread baking takes like 20 mins. The steps are basically this:

1) Get yeast ready with warm water and sugar
2) While yeast is proofing, put dry ingredients and half the flour in a bowl
3) Put wet ingredients into a bowl
4) Once yeast is ready, pour it into wet ingredients, then mix wet ingredients into dry ingredients
5) Stir in other half of flour in increments until you achieve "dough"
6) Knead dough
7) Put dough in warm, dry place in a covered, greased bowl to rise
8) Once risen, punch down dough, make loaves
9) Put loaves in warm, dry place in covered, greased pans to rise
10 Once risen, bake

The actual work is "yeast, mix, knead." The rest of it is just waiting around.

/Yeast is tricky. Follow the directions carefully.
 
2013-05-19 05:35:06 PM  
Baking your own bread will cause something to rise.

(Of course, it depends on the oven used.)
 
2013-05-19 05:36:18 PM  

MadSkillz: whyRpeoplesostupid: Get a good sourdough starter and it won't matter if you're saving money after you taste it compared to the mass produced stuff the stores sell

what's the prep time on something like that?
I am definitely interested in making my own bread.

/fyi, iPads are total shiat to type on


like BKITU said, actual work time is about 20 minutes. I got a sourdough starter and keep it in a crock in the fridge. I mix 1 cup starter (which is 1:1 water:yeast) into 5 cups flour (2 wheat 3 white) and 1 cup water (NO CHLORINATED WATER ALLOWED). 10 minutes kneading in the mixer and let it rise for 6 hours. Then knead it quickly by hand, cut in half, shape it into loaves and let it rise 1.5 to 2 hours and then bake it. You spend about 20 minutes working it, then the bake time for which you gotta hang for. The smell when it's rising and then when it's cooking is great.
 
2013-05-19 05:39:08 PM  

whyRpeoplesostupid: MadSkillz: whyRpeoplesostupid: Get a good sourdough starter and it won't matter if you're saving money after you taste it compared to the mass produced stuff the stores sell

what's the prep time on something like that?
I am definitely interested in making my own bread.

/fyi, iPads are total shiat to type on

like BKITU said, actual work time is about 20 minutes. I got a sourdough starter and keep it in a crock in the fridge. I mix 1 cup starter (which is 1:1 water:yeast) into 5 cups flour (2 wheat 3 white) and 1 cup water (NO CHLORINATED WATER ALLOWED). 10 minutes kneading in the mixer and let it rise for 6 hours. Then knead it quickly by hand, cut in half, shape it into loaves and let it rise 1.5 to 2 hours and then bake it. You spend about 20 minutes working it, then the bake time for which you gotta hang for. The smell when it's rising and then when it's cooking is great.


This recipe for normal bread indicates its sit around time is like 15 minutes. Is it just sourdough's thickness that gives rise to a 6 hr wait time?
 
2013-05-19 05:52:38 PM  
Here's a fun fact:

The English word "Lady" comes from Old English hlæfdige (Unsure of pronunciation, maybe close to "Ha-laugh-die-ye"). The first part, hlæf, means "loaf". The second part means "kneader". Therefore a "Lady" was a "loaf kneader", or one who makes the bread.
 
2013-05-19 06:12:54 PM  

cman: Here's a fun fact:

The English word "Lady" comes from Old English hlæfdige (Unsure of pronunciation, maybe close to "Ha-laugh-die-ye"). The first part, hlæf, means "loaf". The second part means "kneader". Therefore a "Lady" was a "loaf kneader", or one who makes the bread.


Merriam-Webster says you are correct. Here, have a cookie.
 
2013-05-19 06:32:03 PM  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBCtrLksd1I">https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=kBCtrLksd1I
 
2013-05-19 06:59:14 PM  

MadSkillz: whyRpeoplesostupid: MadSkillz: whyRpeoplesostupid: Get a good sourdough starter and it won't matter if you're saving money after you taste it compared to the mass produced stuff the stores sell

what's the prep time on something like that?
I am definitely interested in making my own bread.

/fyi, iPads are total shiat to type on

like BKITU said, actual work time is about 20 minutes. I got a sourdough starter and keep it in a crock in the fridge. I mix 1 cup starter (which is 1:1 water:yeast) into 5 cups flour (2 wheat 3 white) and 1 cup water (NO CHLORINATED WATER ALLOWED). 10 minutes kneading in the mixer and let it rise for 6 hours. Then knead it quickly by hand, cut in half, shape it into loaves and let it rise 1.5 to 2 hours and then bake it. You spend about 20 minutes working it, then the bake time for which you gotta hang for. The smell when it's rising and then when it's cooking is great.

This recipe for normal bread indicates its sit around time is like 15 minutes. Is it just sourdough's thickness that gives rise to a 6 hr wait time?




When i do it that way, it comes out like regular bread. To get a true sourdough you'd make a sponge, let it work for like 12 hours then use that to make the dough and let that rise for a good 6 hours, mist it with water and cook it at like 500 on a baking stone for 40 minutes and get a thick crunchy crust.

To make REAL sourdough you have to get some SanFrancisco sourdough yeast. Yeasts are different all over the World and cause bread to taste different. Apparently France and San fran have some great bread yeast (wines too). I bought a sourdough starter from King Arthur more than 15 years ago and still have the culture but it's all yeasts from MY location now and tastes totally different than it used to.


yeast is one of those things people take for granted, it gives us a lot of wonderful food and drink. They do their work for us in one final giant party-feasting on the carbs w/ hedonistic sex creating millions of burping, farting bacteria that selflessly give their lives so we may have wine and cheese on sourdough
 
2013-05-19 07:22:23 PM  
I do mine in the food processor. Don't have to knead it as much. (I don't have a stand mixer)

Use Barley Malt syrup instead of sugar for an interesting taste.

I buy bread for sandwiches that costs $0.89, so no it saves me nothing but I do it because it is interesting.
 
2013-05-19 07:34:54 PM  
Who bakes their own bread to save money?  You bake your own 1) to have really good, fresh bread to eat; 2) because there's something incredibly satisfying about the whole process; 3) so the family can fight over who gets the privilege of eating the heels.
 
2013-05-19 07:35:33 PM  
I'm probably one of the only people on the planet that actually uses a bread machine...

everyone has one, and you can always find them at yard sales.

it's the only way to make home made bread... economically  but I only really use it just to crank out some basic bread or if I am experimenting. Like when I was developing a recipe for the chocolate porter pumpernickel bread that they are now serving up in the breweries pub with the muscles that are steamed with lager, garlic and butter...

you crank out a few variations of the recipe until you get what you like, then transpose that to a production batch that is done by hand in the traditional way..

Kinda like a pilot house in a brewery...
 
2013-05-19 08:58:13 PM  

Warchild: cman: Here's a fun fact:

The English word "Lady" comes from Old English hlæfdige (Unsure of pronunciation, maybe close to "Ha-laugh-die-ye"). The first part, hlæf, means "loaf". The second part means "kneader". Therefore a "Lady" was a "loaf kneader", or one who makes the bread.

Merriam-Webster says you are correct. Here, have a cookie.


Oddly enough, I made a loaf of bread earlier today.  Coincidence??
 
2013-05-19 10:15:49 PM  

whyRpeoplesostupid: . I mix 1 cup starter (which is 1:1 water:yeast)


Oddly enough, the sourdough starter I use is 1:1 flour/water infected with yeast and lacobacteria from the last batch.

Why do I make bread when I'm on a low carb diet?   Mostly because I don't want my pet yeast culture to die after the effort of keeping it alive.

Where did I get the initial culture?  SASE to here.

500g starter. 2 cups flour, 1.5 teaspoons yeast (bread machine cheating)  3tbl  sugar.  2tsp salt, 100 ml H2O, the the order recommended by bread machine

replenish the culture container with 250g flour, 250ml water.
 
2013-05-19 10:19:23 PM  
oops, forgot 3 tbl oil!
 
2013-05-19 10:22:33 PM  
Does baking your own bread really save you some dough?

Nough.
 
2013-05-19 10:24:10 PM  

Xanadone: Who bakes their own bread to save money?  You bake your own 1) to have really good, fresh bread to eat; 2) because there's something incredibly satisfying about the whole process; 3) so the family can fight over who gets the privilege of eating the heels.


I bake it, I get the heels. BF knows this and keeps the last bit for me.
 
2013-05-19 11:23:17 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: I'm probably one of the only people on the planet that actually uses a bread machine...

everyone has one, and you can always find them at yard sales.

it's the only way to make home made bread... economically  but I only really use it just to crank out some basic bread or if I am experimenting. Like when I was developing a recipe for the chocolate porter pumpernickel bread that they are now serving up in the breweries pub with the muscles that are steamed with lager, garlic and butter...

you crank out a few variations of the recipe until you get what you like, then transpose that to a production batch that is done by hand in the traditional way..

Kinda like a pilot house in a brewery...


We use our bread machine weekly to make pizza dough. Throw all the ingredients in it in the afternoon and start it on the dough setting (no bake) and then forget about it until it's time to make dinner.
 
2013-05-19 11:28:09 PM  
Meh, I get bread for a dollar a loaf at Super America, so I wouldn't be saving money by baking.
 
2013-05-19 11:34:19 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: I'm probably one of the only people on the planet that actually uses a bread machine...

everyone has one, and you can always find them at yard sales.

it's the only way to make home made bread... economically  but I only really use it just to crank out some basic bread or if I am experimenting. Like when I was developing a recipe for the chocolate porter pumpernickel bread that they are now serving up in the breweries pub with the muscles that are steamed with lager, garlic and butter...

you crank out a few variations of the recipe until you get what you like, then transpose that to a production batch that is done by hand in the traditional way..

Kinda like a pilot house in a brewery...


My bread machine gets a workout during the summer when the kids are here.  They love making new breads.  I just don't let them bake it in the machine.  The little paddle ruins the loaf.
 
2013-05-19 11:53:30 PM  

whyRpeoplesostupid: Get a good sourdough starter and it won't matter if you're saving money after you taste it compared to the mass produced stuff the stores sell


Tried it.

First two loaves were great.

Then, it got too sour, even though I was doing what I was supposed to do to keep it at a low sour level.  No one would eat the bread after a while.
 
2013-05-20 12:12:16 AM  
The problem I have with home baked bread is it isn't fortified. Yeast, water, salt and flour do amazing things; there is nothing lovelier than melting butter on warm, fresh-baked bread. But there isn't a lot of nutrients in white flour and consequently most of the breads we buy are fortified in someway with vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

But I do love baking bread.
 
2013-05-20 12:41:25 AM  

cman: Here's a fun fact:

The English word "Lady" comes from Old English hlæfdige (Unsure of pronunciation, maybe close to "Ha-laugh-die-ye"). The first part, hlæf, means "loaf". The second part means "kneader". Therefore a "Lady" was a "loaf kneader", or one who makes the bread.



i.ebayimg.com

HEY LOAF KNEADER!!!
 
2013-05-20 04:33:31 AM  

TheShavingofOccam123: The problem I have with home baked bread is it isn't fortified. Yeast, water, salt and flour do amazing things; there is nothing lovelier than melting butter on warm, fresh-baked bread. But there isn't a lot of nutrients in white flour and consequently most of the breads we buy are fortified in someway with vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

But I do love baking bread.


some breads are fortified because the processing beats the goodness out of the ingredients (or so i am told). i never thought of a loaf of bread as a large part of my daily needed intake of good stuff.

-- last time i tried to bake bread i learned an ugly lesson about old ingredients. bought new yeast but the powdered milk was so old it changed what it was supposed to look like. found this out later from Mrs, who knows what the heck she is doing. sad day, no yummy bread.
 
2013-05-20 07:37:58 AM  
$4 a loaf for normal brown bread at the grocery stores here... Costs me significantly less to bake superior bread at home

/ fresh yeast only
//or sourdough
 
2013-05-20 07:47:22 AM  

Mad_Radhu: Only if your time is worth nothing.


Look up No Work Bread and then get back to me.  Probably takes a total of 5 minutes of effort.  Costs probably 50 cents tops in flour/salt/yeast.

That said, my boyfriend is an artisan baker so I don't bake anymore.  But when I was broke as heck and/or trying to save money *before* that I made half whole wheat no work bread on a weekly basis.  Absolutely no reason not to, it's so stupid easy.
]

TheShavingofOccam123: The problem I have with home baked bread is it isn't fortified. Yeast, water, salt and flour do amazing things; there is nothing lovelier than melting butter on warm, fresh-baked bread. But there isn't a lot of nutrients in white flour and consequently most of the breads we buy are fortified in someway with vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

But I do love baking bread.


You know you can put anything you want into the bread you make, right?  I usually add half whole wheat to any recipe calling for white.  Works out pretty well.  Add honey instead of sugar for the yeast' plenty of nutrients there.  Work herbs into the dough.  Add seeds to the crust.  Whatever.  Options, you have 'em.
 
2013-05-20 07:48:21 AM  
 
2013-05-20 07:59:36 AM  

Gwyrddu: Meh, I get bread for a dollar a loaf at Super America, so I wouldn't be saving money by baking.


You call that bread?  You go by weight not by puffed up size.

/least that's what I tell the ladies.
 
2013-05-20 06:24:56 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: The problem I have with home baked bread is it isn't fortified. Yeast, water, salt and flour do amazing things; there is nothing lovelier than melting butter on warm, fresh-baked bread. But there isn't a lot of nutrients in white flour and consequently most of the breads we buy are fortified in someway with vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

But I do love baking bread.


It is fortified with B vitamins.

Go to a mom and pop drug store, and buy a bottle of 300 once daily multivitamins.  It has what a body needs for about $10.00 per year.
 
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