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(CBS Atlanta)   1 In 5 US children may have a mental disorder. In other news, Total Fark membership may be expected to multiply   (atlanta.cbslocal.com) divider line 134
    More: Interesting, mental disorders  
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2717 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 May 2013 at 2:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-18 06:57:06 PM
Even the CDC is running false flag operations!
 
2013-05-18 07:06:50 PM
Kids are supposed to be cattle now?
 
2013-05-18 07:19:38 PM

ZombieApocalypseKitten: I'm curious, is there a simple code for grief or generic work stress? Sometimes people need to talk but it ain't systemic issue.


Well it obviously varies from case to case, but the generic "go to" V-code would probably be V71.09 No Diagnosis Given on Axis I & II, then I would list Psychosocial Stressors on Axis IV (i.e. Issues at Work, Relationship Issues, Recent Loss) and we would spend our time exploring these issues further rather then concentrating on an Axis I or II disorder.

The V71.09 code is only given when there is literally no other diagnosis that fits, and it's something that can be explained by either a preexisting medical disorder (Axis III) or Psychosocial Stressors (Axis IV). The DSM-5 could possibly include a new grief related category of diagnosis for prolonged grief issues, but this is pretty questionable. After all, who decides what is and isn't appropriate grieving behavior? The DSM-IV-TR included some cultural considerations surrounding appropriate coping and grief strategies, which further complicate the issue.
 
2013-05-18 07:32:21 PM

reklamfox: ZombieApocalypseKitten: I'm curious, is there a simple code for grief or generic work stress? Sometimes people need to talk but it ain't systemic issue.

Well it obviously varies from case to case, but the generic "go to" V-code would probably be V71.09 No Diagnosis Given on Axis I & II, then I would list Psychosocial Stressors on Axis IV (i.e. Issues at Work, Relationship Issues, Recent Loss) and we would spend our time exploring these issues further rather then concentrating on an Axis I or II disorder.

The V71.09 code is only given when there is literally no other diagnosis that fits, and it's something that can be explained by either a preexisting medical disorder (Axis III) or Psychosocial Stressors (Axis IV). The DSM-5 could possibly include a new grief related category of diagnosis for prolonged grief issues, but this is pretty questionable. After all, who decides what is and isn't appropriate grieving behavior? The DSM-IV-TR included some cultural considerations surrounding appropriate coping and grief strategies, which further complicate the issue.


I'm curious about that highlighted above.  I realize this is to the practitioner's judgment, but if a person were diagnosed with depression in there teens, would that override grief at the loss of a loved one?  If so, that is truly scary.  How do they even tell?
 
2013-05-18 07:36:57 PM

dj_bigbird: dj_bigbird: radarlove: At what point does a disorder become an order order become a disorder?  When 51% of us are nuts, is nuts the new norm?

FTFY. Pretty much anything that it's is not docile submission to teachers, parents, law enforcement, etc. is a disorder that can only be dealt with by drugging.

FTFM. FML.


Also - not everyone is going to be world leader in rocket surgery or the star quarterback in the NFL. Maybe your kid just isn't that bright or athletic and you should accept them for that rather than find an excuse for why your kid isn't valedictorian.

/"you" = general you, not you personally dj_bigbird
 
2013-05-18 07:37:47 PM
Today: 1 out of 5 have a mental disorder.
Tomorrow: 5 out of 5 have a mental disorder.
Day after tomorrow: Take the guns away from everybody with a mental disorder.
 
2013-05-18 07:39:17 PM

Target Builder: dj_bigbird: dj_bigbird: radarlove: At what point does a disorder become an order order become a disorder?  When 51% of us are nuts, is nuts the new norm?

FTFY. Pretty much anything that it's is not docile submission to teachers, parents, law enforcement, etc. is a disorder that can only be dealt with by drugging.

FTFM. FML.

Also - not everyone is going to be world leader in rocket surgery or the star quarterback in the NFL. Maybe your kid just isn't that bright or athletic and you should accept them for that rather than find an excuse for why your kid isn't valedictorian.

/"you" = general you, not you personally dj_bigbird


Absolutely.  Kids need to learn to be happy doing what they are good at, not at what is going to make them the most amount of money or gain them the most prestige.
 
2013-05-18 07:48:59 PM

platkat: As others have pointed out, the reason is drugs. We diagnose mental disorders differently in the US, rather than implementing social structures in which our children can grow and flourish.

Here's an interesting article that compares US parenting styles to French parenting styles.


the French are among the most pessimistic people in the world. they are among the last I would look to for parenting advice.

they also put kids with autism in psychiatric hospitals, completely walling them off from society.
 
2013-05-18 08:23:23 PM
Only 1 in 5? Im thinking 51% of the population easy.
 
2013-05-18 08:31:51 PM

ZombieApocalypseKitten: reklamfox: ZombieApocalypseKitten: I'm curious, is there a simple code for grief or generic work stress? Sometimes people need to talk but it ain't systemic issue.

Well it obviously varies from case to case, but the generic "go to" V-code would probably be V71.09 No Diagnosis Given on Axis I & II, then I would list Psychosocial Stressors on Axis IV (i.e. Issues at Work, Relationship Issues, Recent Loss) and we would spend our time exploring these issues further rather then concentrating on an Axis I or II disorder.

The V71.09 code is only given when there is literally no other diagnosis that fits, and it's something that can be explained by either a preexisting medical disorder (Axis III) or Psychosocial Stressors (Axis IV). The DSM-5 could possibly include a new grief related category of diagnosis for prolonged grief issues, but this is pretty questionable. After all, who decides what is and isn't appropriate grieving behavior? The DSM-IV-TR included some cultural considerations surrounding appropriate coping and grief strategies, which further complicate the issue.

I'm curious about that highlighted above.  I realize this is to the practitioner's judgment, but if a person were diagnosed with depression in there teens, would that override grief at the loss of a loved one?  If so, that is truly scary.  How do they even tell?


Well all prior diagnoses are taken into consideration during the intake interview, but they don't necessarily "override" each other. I would make a note of it in my file as "Prior Axis 1 Diagnosis for Depression" but if someone comes to me experiencing issues surrounding profound grief and they have a prior history of depression, as long as they aren't currently psychotic (or suffering from other interfering symptoms) I wouldn't concentrate on actively treating the depression I would work on helping the person process their current feelings. Any respectable counselor would not seek to fit symptoms of grief into the past depression diagnosis because they are simply two separate experiences, but they can affect each other if left untreated. In this instance, I would focus more on coping skills, emphasize strong social supports (this is a biggie for fighting depression) and discuss feelings surrounding the loss. I would urge the person to talk about their history of depression and offer help for dealing with it in the future, but I don't label people just because of their past.

Unlike actual practitioners, I am a counselor, so I concentrate more on the people and not on their disorders (this is not to bad-mouth MD's, I have nothing but respect for doctors) but they tend to treat their patients based on their medical diagnosis while I treat people based on their current symptoms. Crisis work demands it. If you're experiencing issues with grief or know someone who is struggling, I would suggest looking for a local counselor with experience in the specialty field of Grief and Loss, they will be able to separate current issues from past diagnosis no problem.
 
2013-05-18 08:42:57 PM

Theeng: The simple fact of the matter is, the brain is so immensely complex and delicate that what you want is basically impossible at this point in time. The reason treatment is open-ended is that for the most part no mental illness can be traced to one simple thing, there is no virus, no tumor to target. Instead mental health providers are left with a myriad of possiblities from chemical imbalances, genetic defects, environmental causes, etc. to identify and treat, and oh by the way the patient may at any time just decide to stop taking medication/stop showing up to counseling sessions. It is for all intents and purposes trying to hit a target 500 feet away in a opaque cloud as opposed to a target 50 feet away in broad daylight.

Skeptical is fine when you do it from an informed perspective, but you seem to base your skepticism on ignorance, which is never a good thing.


I have graduate-level training in clinical psychology, and I worked as a mental health counselor dealing with dual-diagnosed, chronically ill wards of the state for 2 years.

Think I earned my skepticism, thanks.
 
2013-05-18 08:57:38 PM

PsiChick: Bumblefark: Fair response. I certainly don't begrudge people seeking out help with their problems, however they see fit. Whether it's a psychiatrist, a priest, or a prostitute -- more power to them.

I'm just skeptical of a quasi-medical profession that tells people that the cause of their mental anguish is an underlying "disease" or "disorder" of their mind -- one that can never be cured (or even verified apart from the supposed "symptoms" that give rise to the diagnosis) but can instead only be "managed"...usually through an open-ended regimen of drugs or psychotherapy. (Especially when the efficacy of those treatments is very often ambiguous, at best.)

I mean...on it's face, that kind of looks like a racket, to me.

Part of the reason it looks so 'sketchy' to you is because we know about as much about the human brain as we know about black holes. It ain't a hell of a lot. It's like trying to cure the common cold when you still think leeches are a great idea. There's only so much you can do.

/Take a psych class, I think you'd learn a lot from it. And it's pretty fun if you get a good teacher.


Well, I think that's the key -- humility. There are plenty of fine clinicians out there that I have met. But the one thing they seemed to have in common was a healthy skepticism toward their own science. Most of those people would be the first ones to roll their eyes at the comical hubris of the DSM, understood just how sticky and dysfunctional psychiatric labels can become, and were willing to give thinkers like Szasz his due.

Above all, they would cringe at our growing tendency in society to place problems under the domain of "mental illness," when they simply don't belong there, merely for the sake of expedience.
 
2013-05-18 08:59:37 PM

Bumblefark: Theeng: The simple fact of the matter is, the brain is so immensely complex and delicate that what you want is basically impossible at this point in time. The reason treatment is open-ended is that for the most part no mental illness can be traced to one simple thing, there is no virus, no tumor to target. Instead mental health providers are left with a myriad of possiblities from chemical imbalances, genetic defects, environmental causes, etc. to identify and treat, and oh by the way the patient may at any time just decide to stop taking medication/stop showing up to counseling sessions. It is for all intents and purposes trying to hit a target 500 feet away in a opaque cloud as opposed to a target 50 feet away in broad daylight.

Skeptical is fine when you do it from an informed perspective, but you seem to base your skepticism on ignorance, which is never a good thing.

I have graduate-level training in clinical psychology, and I worked as a mental health counselor dealing with dual-diagnosed, chronically ill wards of the state for 2 years.

Think I earned my skepticism, thanks.


Same here, except it was a home for the mentally disturbed and a year and a half, with a bachelors in psych and summer work in a psych lab for 3 summers.

Wtf is "graduate-level" training, you took a couple of 500-level classes and didn't finish your masters?
 
2013-05-18 09:06:59 PM
Disappointed the headline doesn't say "that's like a quarter!"


/no offence to Subby.
 
2013-05-18 09:23:50 PM

Theeng: Same here, except it was a home for the mentally disturbed and a year and a half, with a bachelors in psych and summer work in a psych lab for 3 summers.


Good to know. Notice how I didn't assume that you were speaking out of ignorance just because we had a difference of opinion.

Wtf is "graduate-level" training, you took a couple of 500-level classes and didn't finish your masters?

My masters was in another field. I took the psychopathology and diagnostic coursework, the methods/stats offerings, a smattering of the topics in counseling, and the practicum. Did more coursework in that field than my own, actually.
 
2013-05-18 09:29:46 PM

dumbobruni: platkat: As others have pointed out, the reason is drugs. We diagnose mental disorders differently in the US, rather than implementing social structures in which our children can grow and flourish.

Here's an interesting article that compares US parenting styles to French parenting styles.

the French are among the most pessimistic people in the world. they are among the last I would look to for parenting advice.

they also put kids with autism in psychiatric hospitals, completely walling them off from society.


Also their men tend to cling to the apron strings far into adulthood.
 
2013-05-18 09:30:06 PM

Bumblefark: Theeng: Same here, except it was a home for the mentally disturbed and a year and a half, with a bachelors in psych and summer work in a psych lab for 3 summers.

Good to know. Notice how I didn't assume that you were speaking out of ignorance just because we had a difference of opinion.

Wtf is "graduate-level" training, you took a couple of 500-level classes and didn't finish your masters?

My masters was in another field. I took the psychopathology and diagnostic coursework, the methods/stats offerings, a smattering of the topics in counseling, and the practicum. Did more coursework in that field than my own, actually.


Should probably mention one of my undergrad degrees is in psych, too, just to go ahead and head off the "yeah, but you probably didn't understand what you were studying" argument, before it comes up...
 
2013-05-18 10:16:00 PM

namegoeshere: dumbobruni: platkat: As others have pointed out, the reason is drugs. We diagnose mental disorders differently in the US, rather than implementing social structures in which our children can grow and flourish.

Here's an interesting article that compares US parenting styles to French parenting styles.

the French are among the most pessimistic people in the world. they are among the last I would look to for parenting advice.

they also put kids with autism in psychiatric hospitals, completely walling them off from society.

Also their men tend to cling to the apron strings far into adulthood.


Eh...American men probably aren't the best counterargument to French parenting. They don't cling to the apron strings, it's true. They just get married, and re-establish the mommy dynamic with their wives...
 
2013-05-18 10:53:53 PM

reklamfox: Yep. As an LPC, most of the clients I see would benefit immensely from just talking to someone who can help them, but I'm telling you its the damn insurance companies that control the mental health industry. It's all about cost controls, and it's waaaaay to expensive to pay for time consuming therapy sessions when you can just write a prescription for some meds and kick them out the door. The generous health insurance policies cover just 5 (maybe 8) counseling sessions, then they expect a prescription to be written. This makes doing my job extremely difficult.


This explains why, for the past two weeks, after going back to therapy, I keep hearing "what do you want?
 and "I don't know how to help you".  My diagnosis is acute panic and generalized anxiety, though they're medicated fine, but also borderline personality disorder. Nobody can write down BPD because it will get me blacklisted by my insurance, since you can't medicate it away.  I'm not a danger to anyone, or myself, I just feel... off. In a hard to explain way. I don't need medicine. I just need someone to talk to, I guess. To even figure out why I feel off and decided I needed to talk to someone. And yet, deep down, I know I am going to get shuffled out the door because I am not slicing my arms open or unable to go to work in the morning because I am too scared to (me of the past in both cases.)  I either have to get better, or get to those awful points before anyone will help me head it off at the pass. Thank you, insurance that I pay a ton of money for.
 
2013-05-18 11:13:10 PM

Bumblefark: PsiChick: Bumblefark: Fair response. I certainly don't begrudge people seeking out help with their problems, however they see fit. Whether it's a psychiatrist, a priest, or a prostitute -- more power to them.

I'm just skeptical of a quasi-medical profession that tells people that the cause of their mental anguish is an underlying "disease" or "disorder" of their mind -- one that can never be cured (or even verified apart from the supposed "symptoms" that give rise to the diagnosis) but can instead only be "managed"...usually through an open-ended regimen of drugs or psychotherapy. (Especially when the efficacy of those treatments is very often ambiguous, at best.)

I mean...on it's face, that kind of looks like a racket, to me.

Part of the reason it looks so 'sketchy' to you is because we know about as much about the human brain as we know about black holes. It ain't a hell of a lot. It's like trying to cure the common cold when you still think leeches are a great idea. There's only so much you can do.

/Take a psych class, I think you'd learn a lot from it. And it's pretty fun if you get a good teacher.

Well, I think that's the key -- humility. There are plenty of fine clinicians out there that I have met. But the one thing they seemed to have in common was a healthy skepticism toward their own science. Most of those people would be the first ones to roll their eyes at the comical hubris of the DSM, understood just how sticky and dysfunctional psychiatric labels can become, and were willing to give thinkers like Szasz his due.

Above all, they would cringe at our growing tendency in society to place problems under the domain of "mental illness," when they simply don't belong there, merely for the sake of expedience.


Most of those problems actually  do belong there. I have low-level Asperger's and bipolar; they both heavily impact my life, and I had to learn to control them, but I'm on the low end of both spectrums. You'd be amazed how bad even low-level mental illness can get.
 
2013-05-18 11:51:25 PM

serpent_sky: reklamfox: Yep. As an LPC, most of the clients I see would benefit immensely from just talking to someone who can help them, but I'm telling you its the damn insurance companies that control the mental health industry. It's all about cost controls, and it's waaaaay to expensive to pay for time consuming therapy sessions when you can just write a prescription for some meds and kick them out the door. The generous health insurance policies cover just 5 (maybe 8) counseling sessions, then they expect a prescription to be written. This makes doing my job extremely difficult.

This explains why, for the past two weeks, after going back to therapy, I keep hearing "what do you want?
 and "I don't know how to help you".  My diagnosis is acute panic and generalized anxiety, though they're medicated fine, but also borderline personality disorder. Nobody can write down BPD because it will get me blacklisted by my insurance, since you can't medicate it away.  I'm not a danger to anyone, or myself, I just feel... off. In a hard to explain way. I don't need medicine. I just need someone to talk to, I guess. To even figure out why I feel off and decided I needed to talk to someone. And yet, deep down, I know I am going to get shuffled out the door because I am not slicing my arms open or unable to go to work in the morning because I am too scared to (me of the past in both cases.)  I either have to get better, or get to those awful points before anyone will help me head it off at the pass. Thank you, insurance that I pay a ton of money for.


I feel your pain friend. If you have the financial means to do so, I would recommend calling around to private practice counseling clinics and ask about their cash only sliding scale payment options for the uninsured. When working with a govt agency there is a huge pressure to only see the people who are in the worst shape, so that leaves the people who just want to talk out of luck. I see many clients like yourself who are worried about permenant labels and insurance, so if you go into a private practice office and offer to pay cash they will totally work with you at a reduced rate. Believe me, it makes billing much easier and you can go in for as many sessions as you please, counselors LOVE clients who pay cash. I wish you luck, and don't give up! Not all us LPCs pigeonhole our clients and I would never DREAM of telling someone, "I cant help you." Hang in there
 
2013-05-18 11:55:12 PM
 
2013-05-19 12:43:51 AM

reklamfox: I feel your pain friend. If you have the financial means to do so, I would recommend calling around to private practice counseling clinics and ask about their cash only sliding scale payment options for the uninsured. When working with a govt agency there is a huge pressure to only see the people who are in the worst shape, so that leaves the people who just want to talk out of luck. I see many clients like yourself who are worried about permenant labels and insurance, so if you go into a private practice office and offer to pay cash they will totally work with you at a reduced rate. Believe me, it makes billing much easier and you can go in for as many sessions as you please, counselors LOVE clients who pay cash. I wish you luck, and don't give up! Not all us LPCs pigeonhole our clients and I would never DREAM of telling someone, "I cant help you." Hang in there


I really don't have the means, unfortunately.  I've been in horrible shape, I've been pushed out before I was entirely ready, regressed, gone back, cycled out, and I see the early stages now (by age 38, you can tell when you're "off".  I just can't put it in words beyond, "I'm off."  Things like "I am obsessing a singer" or "I absolutely MUST eat the same foods every day" or "I will lose it if someone touches my car and be upset all day as a result" aren't enough. To me, they're warning signs that I am going to go apeshiat as I go.  But it's documented that nobody else is in danger, since "apeshiat" means i may yell at someone like an asshole, but I'll go home and punch myself in the head. Or drink half a bottle of vodka and decorate my bathroom with magazine clippings before I pass out. Or if it's really bad, cut my own arm, but not deep enough to be suicidal, so ya know, not a huge deal.  Just completely farking insane behavior that I recognize as such, but can't seem to stop myself from doing. Especially since there is no real "cure" for Borderline, and it's really not dealt with by medicine. (And i go extra farking crazy on SSRI pills... which is actually how all of this STARTED, when my uninsured ass trusted a walk-in state clinic to help with debilitating panic attacks... with Paxil and Zoloft that broke my brain enough to start to cycles of self-harm.)

Sigh.

Yeah. I'm a little frustrated.
 
2013-05-19 02:14:18 AM
serpent_sky, try exercise. It's been shown to be more effective than any medication for depression and anxiety.

/mmm, endorphins.
 
2013-05-19 02:27:09 AM
and this number has been rising for more than a decade.

And Congress still has done nothing to restore or increase the budget of the Mental Health System, even though the demand has been increasing steadily since the late 70's.

After the last episode, they talked a good game about how the funding needed to be increased -- and did nothing about it but they did insist the Military take 400 million for the development of a tank the military doesn't want!
 
2013-05-19 02:31:59 AM

PsiChick: Most of those problems actually do belong there. I have low-level Asperger's and bipolar; they both heavily impact my life, and I had to learn to control them, but I'm on the low end of both spectrums. You'd be amazed how bad even low-level mental illness can get.


Ah...so you assume I'm speaking from ignorance as well...just of another sort than the poster above? Perhaps that might be mistaken as well. :)

Anyway, for whatever it might be worth, you might notice that my criticism was a lot narrower than people seem to be interpreting. I didn't argue that there isn't such a thing as mental suffering. Nor did I even argue that "minor" problems somehow don't count, or that learning to live with such things more productively wasn't a worthwhile endeavor.

I was taking aim specifically at the disease model of mental illness. Take what is probably the most common malady on the books, depression. According to the prevailing paradigm, the affective and behavioral features that we tend to think define the problem (e.g., sadness, apathy, sense of hopelessness, solitude) are regarded merely as the "symptoms" of some deeper, underlying disorder within the mind -- whether neurological or psychological, depending on one's disciplinary perspective.

Now, that's a pretty strange way of thinking about depression, mostly because it posits a causal chain that is difficult to verify, since the "disorder" is mostly unobservable except by way of the symptoms that it supposedly causes, or (in neurological terms) incidental to them. In science, we call thinking of that sort a "tautology," and it is generally frowned upon. But, more than that, this way of looking at depression sets up a very specific way of thinking about suffering, and how to deal with it. I just don't think it's the most helpful way imaginable...

Maybe the "symptoms" of depression is pretty much the sum of the thing. Maybe that's as deep as the reality goes, and our thinking about the causality of the problem is fairly myopic when we restrict ourselves to the individual subject. That sets up a different way of thinking. It doesn't require treating suffering with any less seriousness. It just makes current psychiatric practices look...questionable, if not unhelpful, over the long term.
 
2013-05-19 12:15:48 PM

Bumblefark: PsiChick: Most of those problems actually do belong there. I have low-level Asperger's and bipolar; they both heavily impact my life, and I had to learn to control them, but I'm on the low end of both spectrums. You'd be amazed how bad even low-level mental illness can get.

Ah...so you assume I'm speaking from ignorance as well...just of another sort than the poster above? Perhaps that might be mistaken as well. :)

Anyway, for whatever it might be worth, you might notice that my criticism was a lot narrower than people seem to be interpreting. I didn't argue that there isn't such a thing as mental suffering. Nor did I even argue that "minor" problems somehow don't count, or that learning to live with such things more productively wasn't a worthwhile endeavor.

I was taking aim specifically at the disease model of mental illness. Take what is probably the most common malady on the books, depression. According to the prevailing paradigm, the affective and behavioral features that we tend to think define the problem (e.g., sadness, apathy, sense of hopelessness, solitude) are regarded merely as the "symptoms" of some deeper, underlying disorder within the mind -- whether neurological or psychological, depending on one's disciplinary perspective.

Now, that's a pretty strange way of thinking about depression, mostly because it posits a causal chain that is difficult to verify, since the "disorder" is mostly unobservable except by way of the symptoms that it supposedly causes, or (in neurological terms) incidental to them. In science, we call thinking of that sort a "tautology," and it is generally frowned upon. But, more than that, this way of looking at depression sets up a very specific way of thinking about suffering, and how to deal with it. I just don't think it's the most helpful way imaginable...

Maybe the "symptoms" of depression is pretty much the sum of the thing. Maybe that's as deep as the reality goes, and our thinking about the causality of the problem ...


Well, part of the reason we treat symptoms as, well, symptomatic, is because medications don't just work, sometimes they're the  only thing that works. My issues sure as hell aren't psychological, they're entirely biological. Unipolar depression that appears absent any life issue? That's biological. And treating it with medication is  the only thing that will work in those cases. Talk therapy helps, but you need to fix the neurological problem or you'll see no improvement in the symptoms.
 
2013-05-19 01:23:56 PM

Bumblefark: Maybe the "symptoms" of depression is pretty much the sum of the thing. Maybe that's as deep as the reality goes, and our thinking about the causality of the problem is fairly myopic when we restrict ourselves to the individual subject. That sets up a different way of thinking. It doesn't require treating suffering with any less seriousness. It just makes current psychiatric practices look...questionable, if not unhelpful, over the long term.


You're vague speculations on the symptoms of depression make current psychiatric practices look "questionable, if not unhelpful, over the long term"?  Oookay.
 
2013-05-19 04:10:34 PM

umad: gimmegimme: Kali-Yuga: Not surprising since according to the most recent polls, about 80% of the adults in America suffer from a mental disorder.

Actually, it was more like 47%.

[axiomamnesia.com image 801x738]

That is oversimplifying things quite a bit. For instance, it doesn't account for brain-damaged scum of the Earth who talk politics in threads that aren't about politics.


Well played
 
2013-05-19 04:26:09 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: umad: gimmegimme: Kali-Yuga: Not surprising since according to the most recent polls, about 80% of the adults in America suffer from a mental disorder.

Actually, it was more like 47%.

[axiomamnesia.com image 801x738]

That is oversimplifying things quite a bit. For instance, it doesn't account for brain-damaged scum of the Earth who talk politics in threads that aren't about politics.

Well played


Thanks. And thanks for the total Fark. Now I won't be getting anything done for the next few weeks. :)
 
2013-05-19 05:19:50 PM
"Mental disorder" can account for anything from ADHD, oppositional-defiance disorder, to schizophrenia and bi-polar disorder. With such a wide spectrum and vagleading label iis a wonder the figure isn't much higher. Plus, have you seen these hellspawn brats today? Nuts, I tell ya.
 
2013-05-19 05:41:31 PM

umad: The Stealth Hippopotamus: umad: gimmegimme: Kali-Yuga: Not surprising since according to the most recent polls, about 80% of the adults in America suffer from a mental disorder.

Actually, it was more like 47%.

[axiomamnesia.com image 801x738]

That is oversimplifying things quite a bit. For instance, it doesn't account for brain-damaged scum of the Earth who talk politics in threads that aren't about politics.

Well played

Thanks. And thanks for the total Fark. Now I won't be getting anything done for the next few weeks. :)


You shall entertain me. Take heart in this.
 
2013-05-20 02:09:54 AM

Tanuki no Kintama: Bumblefark: Maybe the "symptoms" of depression is pretty much the sum of the thing. Maybe that's as deep as the reality goes, and our thinking about the causality of the problem is fairly myopic when we restrict ourselves to the individual subject. That sets up a different way of thinking. It doesn't require treating suffering with any less seriousness. It just makes current psychiatric practices look...questionable, if not unhelpful, over the long term.

You're vague speculations on the symptoms of depression make current psychiatric practices look "questionable, if not unhelpful, over the long term"?  Oookay.


Your (not "you're") vague criticism doesn't at all come across as passive aggressive.

Got a point you'd like to make, sport?
 
2013-05-20 02:17:06 AM

PsiChick: Well, part of the reason we treat symptoms as, well, symptomatic, is because medications don't just work, sometimes they're the only thing that works. My issues sure as hell aren't psychological, they're entirely biological. Unipolar depression that appears absent any life issue? That's biological. And treating it with medication is the only thing that will work in those cases. Talk therapy helps, but you need to fix the neurological problem or you'll see no improvement in the symptoms.


Excellent point.

I was discussing clinical depression. Know what works as well as medication? Exercise. Sort of makes sense, doesn't it?

Maybe, if your body and mind have become morbid, the answer to that is activity. Not speculating on some unobservable cause behind those "symptoms," but rather just the behavior itself. Change the behavior.
 
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