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(WTKR)   Think you take a long time to swing your monster SUV into a U-Turn? Try doing it with an aircraft carrier   (wtkr.com) divider line 19
    More: Cool, U-turn, USS Theodore Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Newport News Shipbuilding, monsters  
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5681 clicks; posted to Video » on 18 May 2013 at 11:53 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-05-18 12:06:43 PM  
What a load of ship!
 
2013-05-18 12:09:15 PM  
Oh wait it's the Theodore Roosevelt - what a load of bully ship.
 
2013-05-18 12:15:19 PM  
Show one doing a U-turn at sea, under its own power, and see what kind of distance is involved.

This is more like, "Think you take a long time to swing your monster SUV into a U-Turn with a tow truck?"
 
2013-05-18 12:47:15 PM  
Fark that video. If you full-screen it and then pause it, the controls disappear. It loads slower than it plays, so it pauses every 4 seconds, but you can't pause it to let it load and then restart it without resizing it, and I WANT TO WATCH THE GODDAMNED THING FULLSCREEN!
 
2013-05-18 01:20:46 PM  
The USS Theodore Roosevelt is similar to SUVs in many ways.  For example, it should also stay the f**k out of the passing lane on I-5.
 
2013-05-18 02:35:08 PM  

redsquid: Oh wait it's the Theodore Roosevelt - what a load of bully ship.


3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-18 08:03:49 PM  
Did somebody rent the flight deck for their son's bar mitzvah?  Those are a couple of honkin' big white tents.
 
2013-05-18 09:05:38 PM  
I had a co-worker who served on the USS Enterprise, and while he was a known bullshiatter, he was at least an entertaining one so you didn't mind so much. Anyway, he claimed that when the Enterprise came in to San Francisco, the pilot would approach the Golden Gate bridge at an angle and then turn the ship hard to heel the entire thing over enough that the antennas would clear.

Since this is the sort of thread that is likely to be covered in seamen, I figured this was the place to ask if my co-worker was telling the truth for once.
 
2013-05-18 09:30:42 PM  
The thumbnail image with the scraggly masts and parts crudely sticking out everywhere and gray color reminds me of the half-completed Death Star.
 
2013-05-18 10:09:38 PM  

maxheck: I had a co-worker who served on the USS Enterprise, and while he was a known bullshiatter, he was at least an entertaining one so you didn't mind so much. Anyway, he claimed that when the Enterprise came in to San Francisco, the pilot would approach the Golden Gate bridge at an angle and then turn the ship hard to heel the entire thing over enough that the antennas would clear.

Since this is the sort of thread that is likely to be covered in seamen, I figured this was the place to ask if my co-worker was telling the truth for once.


Actually, no. However, the Enterprise did once get stuck on a sand bar for several hours in San Francisco bay, and they had to shift as much mass as possible to one side of the ship to free her. The San Francisco Chronicle ran the picture of the Big E listing at about 30 degrees, above the fold and above the masthead, so it took up the entire top of the front page. I think it was the coolest front page ever published in a newspaper. I still have a copy of it somewhere. So your friend may have had his stories crossed.

I can't find the image used by the paper, but here's a partial article: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,923599,00.html
 
2013-05-18 11:00:25 PM  

maxheck: I had a co-worker who served on the USS Enterprise, and while he was a known bullshiatter, he was at least an entertaining one so you didn't mind so much. Anyway, he claimed that when the Enterprise came in to San Francisco, the pilot would approach the Golden Gate bridge at an angle and then turn the ship hard to heel the entire thing over enough that the antennas would clear.

Since this is the sort of thread that is likely to be covered in seamen, I figured this was the place to ask if my co-worker was telling the truth for once.


I may be wrong. According to an Enterprise website I just visited, the Big E is 250 feet from keel to topmast. The Golden Gate Bridge has 220 feet clearance. As I doubt that the Enterprise draws 30 feet of depth, your co-worker may be right, although I'd bet that they can gain the difference by hinging the radar mast that tops the superstructure. Now, I'm curious.
 
2013-05-19 12:57:24 AM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: maxheck: I had a co-worker who served on the USS Enterprise, and while he was a known bullshiatter, he was at least an entertaining one so you didn't mind so much. Anyway, he claimed that when the Enterprise came in to San Francisco, the pilot would approach the Golden Gate bridge at an angle and then turn the ship hard to heel the entire thing over enough that the antennas would clear.

Since this is the sort of thread that is likely to be covered in seamen, I figured this was the place to ask if my co-worker was telling the truth for once.

I may be wrong. According to an Enterprise website I just visited, the Big E is 250 feet from keel to topmast. The Golden Gate Bridge has 220 feet clearance. As I doubt that the Enterprise draws 30 feet of depth, your co-worker may be right, although I'd bet that they can gain the difference by hinging the radar mast that tops the superstructure. Now, I'm curious.


39-foot draft
 
2013-05-19 01:12:48 AM  
You see my problem.... The geometry fits, but....  Do you do that with a ginormous nuclear powered warship, or do you waif for low tide?
 
2013-05-19 01:20:31 AM  
Or even *wait* for low tide. Waifing, you have to wait longer.
 
2013-05-19 02:06:23 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: maxheck: I had a co-worker who served on the USS Enterprise, and while he was a known bullshiatter, he was at least an entertaining one so you didn't mind so much. Anyway, he claimed that when the Enterprise came in to San Francisco, the pilot would approach the Golden Gate bridge at an angle and then turn the ship hard to heel the entire thing over enough that the antennas would clear.

Since this is the sort of thread that is likely to be covered in seamen, I figured this was the place to ask if my co-worker was telling the truth for once.

I may be wrong. According to an Enterprise website I just visited, the Big E is 250 feet from keel to topmast. The Golden Gate Bridge has 220 feet clearance. As I doubt that the Enterprise draws 30 feet of depth, your co-worker may be right, although I'd bet that they can gain the difference by hinging the radar mast that tops the superstructure. Now, I'm curious.

39-foot draft


Thanks. That's a lot of water to push out of your way at 30+ knots. So they'd have cleared the Golden Gate Bridge by at least 9 feet at low tide.
 
2013-05-19 07:45:22 AM  
The Nimitz draft is about 40 feet or so. Depends on how much aircraft fuel and other stores are on board.
 
2013-05-19 11:13:30 AM  

maxheck: I had a co-worker who served on the USS Enterprise, and while he was a known bullshiatter, he was at least an entertaining one so you didn't mind so much. Anyway, he claimed that when the Enterprise came in to San Francisco, the pilot would approach the Golden Gate bridge at an angle and then turn the ship hard to heel the entire thing over enough that the antennas would clear.

Since this is the sort of thread that is likely to be covered in seamen, I figured this was the place to ask if my co-worker was telling the truth for once.


A picture is worth a thousand words.
i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-19 05:42:18 PM  
bloviatingzeppelin.net

USS Enterprise, adrift.
 
2013-05-19 11:19:47 PM  

darthaegis: Show one doing a U-turn at sea, under its own power, and see what kind of distance is involved.

This is more like, "Think you take a long time to swing your monster SUV into a U-Turn with a tow truck?"


Actually carriers are quite maneuverable for their size. 4 screws, 4 rudders and 220,000 horsepower at your disposal helps a bunch. Not like a large oil tanker 4 times heavier than a carrier with 1/4 the HP and one small rudder.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Encki1BzXo
 
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