If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(ABC)   For your gun grabbing pants wetting enjoyment, we present the world's first long range precision guided rifle   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 131
    More: Cool, mobile apps, laser tag, Mayors Against Illegal Guns, Schaeuble, leaks, Josh Horwitz  
•       •       •

7093 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 May 2013 at 10:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



131 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-18 06:39:20 AM
I like guns, and marksmanship is one of my hobbies.

But I am having a hard time finding a legitimate use for this firearm. It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.
 
2013-05-18 06:44:09 AM

mr_a: I like guns, and marksmanship is one of my hobbies.

But I am having a hard time finding a legitimate use for this firearm. It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.


Less stray bullets from hunters.
 
2013-05-18 06:49:40 AM
Sounds gimmicky.
 
2013-05-18 07:18:18 AM

mr_a: It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.


Really?

Someone who can afford $22k for a rifle and you think they're gonna cause trouble?

When was the last time a legal machine gun was used in a crime? They only run $15k for something like a grease gun.

Crime is socio-economic. The things around you that are trouble waiting to happen are myriad and there's nothing stopping anyone from inflicting them upon you except socio-economics. Someone who can afford one of these rifles will have no reason to use one for illicit activity and anyone who can steal one is skilled enough they don't need to.

What will they be used for? Deer hunting and wad cutting.
 
2013-05-18 07:24:51 AM
They're selling them through an application/vetting process for $15-22K, they're password-protected, and affixed to long rifles.  That eliminates the poor, the young, the thief, and then almost every gun crime. Not that sniper attacks never happen, but they are rare and Lee Boyd Malvo taught us that you don't need a laser range finder to kill anonymously at a distance.

Pants: dry.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-05-18 07:41:22 AM

mr_a: I like guns, and marksmanship is one of my hobbies.

But I am having a hard time finding a legitimate use for this firearm. It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.


Maybe, but most criminals/militia nuts won't be able to afford it.
 
2013-05-18 07:42:05 AM

mr_a: I like guns, and marksmanship is one of my hobbies.

But I am having a hard time finding a legitimate use for this firearm. It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.


This would make an outstanding hunting rifle.

I don't see the problem. The advancement here is improved accuracy. It's not going to increase the body count if some psycho took it to a theater for a little pray and spray.
 
2013-05-18 08:45:38 AM
And yet some moron will still shoot themselves with it.
 
2013-05-18 08:55:10 AM

RedPhoenix122: And yet some moron will still shoot themselves with it.


From a distance.
 
2013-05-18 08:57:32 AM

factoryconnection: They're selling them through an application/vetting process for $15-22K, they're password-protected, and affixed to long rifles.  That eliminates the poor, the young, the thief, and then almost every gun crime. Not that sniper attacks never happen, but they are rare and Lee Boyd Malvo taught us that you don't need a laser range finder to kill anonymously at a distance.

Pants: dry.


Sounds like an infringement on 2A. Quick, to the NRA outragemobile!
 
2013-05-18 09:17:11 AM
A rank amateur can reliably hit a target from half a Km? This will be interesting.

The high price and customer vetting are only temporary. Someone will reverse engineer the technology and flood the market with cheap but effective imitations. This stuff will be everywhere and there's nothing we can do to stop it.
 
2013-05-18 09:18:42 AM
www.bored383.com
 
2013-05-18 09:19:30 AM
1.bp.blogspot.com
It's important that you read the manual to discover what the Red Button does!
 
2013-05-18 09:26:43 AM

F-14Tomcat: A rank amateur can reliably hit a target from half a Km? This will be interesting.

The high price and customer vetting are only temporary. Someone will reverse engineer the technology and flood the market with cheap but effective imitations. This stuff will be everywhere and there's nothing we can do to stop it.


Cheap? Yes. Effective? No. At least not for another decade.

I could actually build a system very similar had I the time or interest, the fact they got the cost down to under $30,000 and can still turn a profit is about the only thing about this system that impresses me.
 
2013-05-18 09:45:28 AM

iq_in_binary: Cheap? Yes. Effective? No. At least not for another decade.


I admit I don't completely understand the tech, but i would guess the software is the key, and that is the easiest part to copy.

Either way, five years or a decade, might as well be tomorrow from my perspective.
 
2013-05-18 10:01:17 AM

iq_in_binary: F-14Tomcat: A rank amateur can reliably hit a target from half a Km? This will be interesting.

The high price and customer vetting are only temporary. Someone will reverse engineer the technology and flood the market with cheap but effective imitations. This stuff will be everywhere and there's nothing we can do to stop it.

Cheap? Yes. Effective? No. At least not for another decade.

I could actually build a system very similar had I the time or interest, the fact they got the cost down to under $30,000 and can still turn a profit is about the only thing about this system that impresses me.


Shouldn't be hard to get the price lower than that. The image processing can be done by something like a RPi, especially on a range with non-moving targets. Getting a servo or actuator to respond fast enough would be the pricey bit; but marking a dot on an image and saying 'release the firing pin when the trigger is down and the point of aim is close enough to the dot' would be easy. Let's see how well it keeps an aim point on a moving turkey or deer in foliage, then I might be impressed.

And from the look of the video, it doesn't automagically compensate for windage, drop, or the coriolis effect (bad joke, but the CoD crowd might think it needs to). There are some really interesting scopes and apps out there that do figure out your bullet drop based on ammo brand / weight and powder amount. Figuring windage is a bit trickier, and without that a 1000 yard shot won't hit where you want it to, no matter how many times you only pull the trigger when the cross-hair is on the 10 dot.
 
2013-05-18 10:03:07 AM
It's a $2000 gun with a $20,000 dollar scope.  This tech has been around awhile, and it will only get cheaper from here on out.
 
2013-05-18 10:03:42 AM

mr_a: I like guns, and marksmanship is one of my hobbies.

But I am having a hard time finding a legitimate use for this firearm. It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.


I'm a raging, fire-spitting libtard and even I have a loaded sidearm in the nightstand (no kids). All 'we' liberal "gun-grabbers" are asking for are common-sense solution such as gun buyers being vetted more thoroughly. No one wants to "grab" sensible firearms.

Come in my house unannounced? I'll farking kill you. But reigning in the emergence of weapons created only for mass humans' deaths? Yeah, I have something to say about that.
 
2013-05-18 10:06:05 AM

F-14Tomcat: iq_in_binary: Cheap? Yes. Effective? No. At least not for another decade.

I admit I don't completely understand the tech, but i would guess the software is the key, and that is the easiest part to copy.

Either way, five years or a decade, might as well be tomorrow from my perspective.


Actually the software is and at least since the 8088 came out has been the easiest part.

Where we're actually seeing headway into making technology like this capable has been cheap and readily available microprocessor platforms and the accompanying integration of equally cheap and easily available sensors.

Android/Arduino/iOS etc. isn't what made this possible, access to the hardware and sensors without a 1,000 pc. minimum for purchase did.

However, that being said, that's just the electronics side of things. The small parts, with their requisite tighter tolerances, are another matter. Unless you're willing to drop the funds to go MIM (very expensive, just one mold could easily run you six figures, let alone the machine to run it or to contract it out, but is easily balanced out if continuous demand for bulk sales exists), you're talking about a bunch of machine time per unit. That there is what kills you (heh).

Another thing that should be noted is that this system isn't all that accurate. I've known weekenders that can shoot with twice the accuracy, and have personally taught people to shoot farther just as reliably in just a couple of weekends at the range. This is far from military grade hardware, it still can't replace even a middling shooter.
 
2013-05-18 10:06:33 AM
"Finally, we'll be able to even the odds against those elusive creatures."

s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-05-18 10:20:10 AM
Ah sh*t, I DNRTFA. Post was misplaced. Dude, it's Saturday morning and I'm most certainly hungover.
 
2013-05-18 10:30:53 AM

iq_in_binary: F-14Tomcat: iq_in_binary: Cheap? Yes. Effective? No. At least not for another decade.

I admit I don't completely understand the tech, but i would guess the software is the key, and that is the easiest part to copy.

Either way, five years or a decade, might as well be tomorrow from my perspective.

Actually the software is and at least since the 8088 came out has been the easiest part.

Where we're actually seeing headway into making technology like this capable has been cheap and readily available microprocessor platforms and the accompanying integration of equally cheap and easily available sensors.

Android/Arduino/iOS etc. isn't what made this possible, access to the hardware and sensors without a 1,000 pc. minimum for purchase did.

However, that being said, that's just the electronics side of things. The small parts, with their requisite tighter tolerances, are another matter. Unless you're willing to drop the funds to go MIM (very expensive, just one mold could easily run you six figures, let alone the machine to run it or to contract it out, but is easily balanced out if continuous demand for bulk sales exists), you're talking about a bunch of machine time per unit. That there is what kills you (heh).

Another thing that should be noted is that this system isn't all that accurate. I've known weekenders that can shoot with twice the accuracy, and have personally taught people to shoot farther just as reliably in just a couple of weekends at the range. This is far from military grade hardware, it still can't replace even a middling shooter.


The part I can't figure out is the camera sensor. I've seen lots of camera sensors, from cheap hobby 1 MP to the ones in DSLRs, and I've yet to meet one that would be happy sitting on top of a .338 and soaking up it's share of the recoil forces. Adding the magnification in front of it (please tell me the lenses are there for magnification and that it's not a digital magnification) just seems like a good way to get the sensor out of line with the cross-hairs. Which would throw of . . . well, it depends on the software what it throws off.

As for the 8088, that little chip can't crunch numbers fast enough to handle video. Shape tracking in high res video has lots of study that's gone into it, and wouldn't have been easy for a long time. Too much data, too few clock cycles. That there are now open source libraries to handle it, that one could probably compile down to an 8088, doesn't make the bandwidth problem go away. But now there are plenty of very tiny chips that have plenty of clock cycles to spare.
 
2013-05-18 10:38:24 AM
Apparently Texans are too farking lazy to practice. Zaytsev + a Mosin + motivation = a pile of dead Nazis.
 
2013-05-18 10:52:47 AM
More like pants grabbing, "gun" wetting.
 
2013-05-18 10:55:41 AM

Marcus Aurelius: It's a $2000 gun with a $20,000 dollar scope.  This tech has been around awhile, and it will only get cheaper from here on out.


Yeah, no.  A halfway decent long gun in 300WM or 338 is significantly more than that - and at the ranges they are claiming, the rifle is going to have to be significantly better than halfway decent.

Speaking of TFA - this quote: "This technology potentially enables any two bit criminal to operate with the skills of a highly trained sniper," is why I discount pretty much anything MAIG has to say.  How, exactly, is a two bit criminal getting his hands on a $22K rifle?
 
2013-05-18 10:59:09 AM
$22,500

Well. Okay then.
 
2013-05-18 10:59:34 AM

Uisce Beatha: Marcus Aurelius: It's a $2000 gun with a $20,000 dollar scope.  This tech has been around awhile, and it will only get cheaper from here on out.

Yeah, no.  A halfway decent long gun in 300WM or 338 is significantly more than that - and at the ranges they are claiming, the rifle is going to have to be significantly better than halfway decent.

Speaking of TFA - this quote: "This technology potentially enables any two bit criminal to operate with the skills of a highly trained sniper," is why I discount pretty much anything MAIG has to say.  How, exactly, is a two bit criminal getting his hands on a $22K rifle?


Think really hard about your last sentence.
 
2013-05-18 11:01:36 AM
There is some serious anti-gun derp in this article.

"I'm very much in favor of the password protection, but [if the user opts not to utilize password protection] this product gives shooters a better accuracy than, on average, most cops," Fineman said. He said the target accuracy of most police is three out of ten.
"To think that private citizens that are not trained could shoot better than 3 out of 10, it's scary," Fineman said.
David Chipman, a spokesman for Mayors Against Illegal Guns which lobbies for an expansion of background checks for people buying guns, said the PGF "is not your grandfather's hunting rifle used for sport and recreation this is a weapon designed to kill with precision."


Because my grandfather's hunting rifle was not designed to kill with precision....

"This is an industry hell bent on making weapons more lethal and taking no measures to extend safety," Horwitz said.  "If this type of technology is transferred into semi automatic and automatic weapons, it would make it even more lethal."

Semi-automatic and automatic!  Boogaboogah!
 
2013-05-18 11:02:15 AM

Uisce Beatha: How, exactly, is a two bit criminal getting his hands on a $22K rifle?


By stealing it?
 
2013-05-18 11:03:47 AM

ykarie: As for the 8088, that little chip can't crunch numbers fast enough to handle video. Shape tracking in high res video has lots of study that's gone into it, and wouldn't have been easy for a long time. Too much data, too few clock cycles. That there are now open source libraries to handle it, that one could probably compile down to an 8088, doesn't make the bandwidth problem go away. But now there are plenty of very tiny chips that have plenty of clock cycles to spare.


It's possible they're doing something electromechanical rather than computational. The Maverick missile has been doing object tracking since 1972... seven years before the introduction of the 8088.
 
2013-05-18 11:04:32 AM
The PGF line of rifles come equipped with what the company is calling the XactSystem, which uses a network tracking scope with digital display interface, laser tagging to "paint" a moving target, and a guided trigger that only lets the shooter fire when there is a high percentage shot.

In other words, people who are untrained will not be able to fire the gun anywhere near the rate of a skilled marksman.
 
2013-05-18 11:10:57 AM

Johnson: Uisce Beatha: How, exactly, is a two bit criminal getting his hands on a $22K rifle?

By stealing it?


It runs Linux.  Does the average criminal know Linux?
/you have to type sudo -K first
 
2013-05-18 11:11:59 AM
There sure is a lot of pants-wetting in TFA.

I
 
2013-05-18 11:13:03 AM
...heart Fark gun threads. They make me feel all warm and fuzzy.

/stupid <
 
2013-05-18 11:16:15 AM
First, repeat: http://m.fark.com/comments/7528198/Linux-finally-has-its-killer-app?st artid=81792737&from_page=geek

factoryconnection: "Lee Boyd Malvo taught us that you don't need a laser range finder to kill anonymously at a distance."

Malvo was something like 50/50 (for killing) at 50'. I'm pretty sure anything but a Bushmaster .223 would have been vastly more effective. He also might not have been sufficiently psychotic enough to want to kill every time he pulled the trigger.

sammyk: "This would make an outstanding hunting rifle."

For the money, you could have quite a few deer hand fed so you could walk up and shoot them. About the same hunting experience.


iq_in_binary: "Android/Arduino/iOS etc. isn't what made this possible, access to the hardware and sensors without a 1,000 pc. minimum for purchase did."

as the original implied: Linux

Uisce Beatha:"Speaking of TFA - this quote: "This technology potentially enables any two bit criminal to operate with the skills of a highly trained sniper," is why I discount pretty much anything MAIG has to say. How, exactly, is a two bit criminal getting his hands on a $22K rifle?"

Check the silk road/craigslist after this hits volume and find out what fenced autotargeting rifles cost? (of course, once you run out of included ammo don't count on buying more for a hot rifle. It only fires proprietary ammo). I wonder if the FBI will supply these "autorifles" in "Patriot Stings" much the same way the've been "busting terrorist cells" by supplying "explosives" to "terrorist cells". As long as it is out of reach of the the patsies, they might actually believe it's the real deal.
 
2013-05-18 11:17:17 AM

whither_apophis: How, exactly, is a two bit criminal getting his hands on a $22K rifle?

Think really hard about your last sentence.


Johnson: Uisce Beatha: How, exactly, is a two bit criminal getting his hands on a $22K rifle?

By stealing it?


You realize that if someone has the scratch to buy a $22K rifle, they are going to have a hell of a safe, right?  That isn't a weapon you keep in the nightstand or hanging above the door...
 
2013-05-18 11:20:33 AM

doglover: mr_a: It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.

Really?

Someone who can afford $22k for a rifle and you think they're gonna cause trouble?

When was the last time a legal machine gun was used in a crime? They only run $15k for something like a grease gun.

Crime is socio-economic. The things around you that are trouble waiting to happen are myriad and there's nothing stopping anyone from inflicting them upon you except socio-economics. Someone who can afford one of these rifles will have no reason to use one for illicit activity and anyone who can steal one is skilled enough they don't need to.

What will they be used for? Deer hunting and wad cutting.


And we're done here. Not that that fundamental truth will prevent the pants wetting crowd from getting all frothy over this aiming system
 
2013-05-18 11:20:38 AM
ykarie:

And from the look of the video, it doesn't automagically compensate for windage, drop, or the coriolis effect (bad joke, but the CoD crowd might think it needs to). There are some really interesting scopes and apps out there that do figure out your bullet drop based on ammo brand / weight and powder amount. Figuring windage is a bit trickier, and without that a 1000 yard shot won't hit where you want it to, no matter how many times you only pull the trigger when the cross-hair is on the 10 dot.
i.imgur.com
This is incorrect.  2/3 of the entire point of the rifle is that it does check distance, wind, and compensates (though not for cases where the wind near the target is different from that near the shooter).  They very clearly state in their promotional materials that the scope displays the user-defined target and the expected hitpoint and does not show a traditional fixed crosshair.
 
2013-05-18 11:22:31 AM
pastorkius:  It runs Linux.  Does the average criminal know Linux?


Prompt commands are suspicious

Campus Police: Linux users are criminals
 
2013-05-18 11:23:35 AM

Fubini: ykarie: As for the 8088, that little chip can't crunch numbers fast enough to handle video. Shape tracking in high res video has lots of study that's gone into it, and wouldn't have been easy for a long time. Too much data, too few clock cycles. That there are now open source libraries to handle it, that one could probably compile down to an 8088, doesn't make the bandwidth problem go away. But now there are plenty of very tiny chips that have plenty of clock cycles to spare.

It's possible they're doing something electromechanical rather than computational. The Maverick missile has been doing object tracking since 1972... seven years before the introduction of the 8088.


it's possible, but not likely. If you slew your view completely off target with an electromechanical system, you lose the ability to keep track of it. Basic object shape tracking is something that can be run on a penny-a-piece Atmel CPU. Plus, computational methods have the benefit that if the animal moves and changes shape (to the camera's perspective) it is easier to keep track of; something the 65-A wasn't as capable of doing if it wasn't centered on target already.

And the AGM-65A couldn't really be told to "hit the target that is under the dot . . . now" and expected to do it when launched later.
 
2013-05-18 11:28:38 AM

The Smails Kid: There sure is a lot of pants-wetting in TFA.


Yup. I was particularly struck by this comment: "David Chipman, a spokesman for Mayors Against Illegal Guns which lobbies for an expansion of background checks for people buying guns, said the PGF "is not your grandfather's hunting rifle used for sport and recreation this is a weapon designed to kill with precision.""

My grandfather's hunting rifle was made in 1898. It features precision design and machining and was clearly a weapon designed to kill with precision. What, does this buffoon think traditional rifles are sloppily designed with haphazard killing ability somehow thrown into the mix?

Moran.
 
2013-05-18 11:29:19 AM

yet_another_wumpus: sammyk: "This would make an outstanding hunting rifle."

For the money, you could have quite a few deer hand fed so you could walk up and shoot them. About the same hunting experience.


I grew up hunting in Wyoming. I've never had a shot at less than 150 yards and I have taken many at much longer ranges.
 
2013-05-18 11:32:05 AM

frankmanhog: ykarie:

And from the look of the video, it doesn't automagically compensate for windage, drop, or the coriolis effect (bad joke, but the CoD crowd might think it needs to). There are some really interesting scopes and apps out there that do figure out your bullet drop based on ammo brand / weight and powder amount. Figuring windage is a bit trickier, and without that a 1000 yard shot won't hit where you want it to, no matter how many times you only pull the trigger when the cross-hair is on the 10 dot.
[i.imgur.com image 786x411]
This is incorrect.  2/3 of the entire point of the rifle is that it does check distance, wind, and compensates (though not for cases where the wind near the target is different from that near the shooter).  They very clearly state in their promotional materials that the scope displays the user-defined target and the expected hitpoint and does not show a traditional fixed crosshair.


Wait, they compensate for the coriolis effect, but not the eötvös effect? Guess which one has more effect on bullet drop . . .

And figuring on wind near the shooter being the same as wind at the far end is a bad thing to guess at. It won't be if you are hunting from a good blind, or a tent, or lots of local camo that covers the 'wind sensor'. a 1000 yard shot is going to have several different wind effects when hunting, it isn't always a clear field or solid trees between you and the big deer. Seriously, I was only mocking CoD when I suggested it should compensate for the coriolis effect. I guess I can figure out who their marketing is aiming at.
 
2013-05-18 11:34:51 AM
this thing is stupid. sport shooting is supposed to be a sport. this thing is the equivalent of going out to play tennis and then letting a robot play for you. why bother? if you take the skill out of marksmanship, what is the point?
 
2013-05-18 11:38:12 AM
Uisce Beatha:  You realize that if someone has the scratch to buy a $22K rifle, they are going to have a hell of a safe, right?

AR-15 stolen from Gun Lobbyist

5ft 850lb Gun Safe stolen

Three Large VERY HEAVY Safes containing guns and 50,000 rounds of ammo stolen

two bit criminals will steal anything these days
 
2013-05-18 11:45:42 AM
Anyone who thinks there will be a crime problem with this is a nitwit who watches too much TV.    As to two-bit criminals stealing one, how may of these do you guys think they will sell?   If a criminal wanted to steal one, they would have to first find someone who had one in the first place.

This is the same bullshiat argument that California used when they banned .50BMG rifles, even though they could not identify one crime where a .50BMG rifles was used.

As to the rifle itself, I have yet to see anything the electronics compensating for windage, and if it can't do that, it isn't all that more useful than a normal rifle/scope combination with a high end laser range finder.  Even on an excellent LR round like the 338 Lapua, if the 5 mile an hour quartering wind you estimated is really 7 mph from 55º, you windage at 1K yards will be off by over a foot.  I have been doing LR shooting for 20 years, and even at a surveyed range, with wind flags and a spotting scope to read mirage, telling the difference between wind that is 5mph @ 45º and 7mph @ 55º is very difficult.
 
2013-05-18 11:46:31 AM
www.matchflick.com
 
2013-05-18 11:47:53 AM
BraveNewCheneyWorld:
In other words, people who are untrained will not be able to fire the gun anywhere near the rate of a skilled marksman.

http://007rb.blogspot.com/2013/04/bullseye-from-1000-yards-shooting- 17 000.html  Details a shooters first ever shot with any rifle.  Hitting a target 1000 yards away.  The only questions about such a shot are "did the target live" and "did the shooter escape".  I'm guessing that 1000 yards and .338 ammo mean both are going to happen.
[I'm pretty sure this is taken from an arstechnica article that disappeared down the memory hole.]

Fark It: There is some serious anti-gun derp in this article.

"This is an industry hell bent on making weapons more lethal and taking no measures to extend safety," Horwitz said.  "If this type of technology is transferred into semi automatic and automatic weapons, it would make it even more lethal."

Semi-automatic and automatic!  Boogaboogah!

Aside from the obvious point that you can get hotter/more accurate rounds with bolt action, I'd think that competing rifles would be stupid to require such slow action.  Are you implying that semi-automatic rifles haven't been selling well since they proved their ability to eliminate dangerous kindergartener threats?
As it is, the rifles themselves had to dance around said issue since pulling the trigger doesn't actually fire the round. They have both the legal issues of a "robot fired rifle" and "machine-gun law". I'm guessing that the bolt action does double duty in (beyond often being prefered in such applications) for both marketing "you won't need another round" and legal defence "can't be reflashed into a machine gun since you have to load the next round manually".
 
2013-05-18 11:54:04 AM

vpb: mr_a: I like guns, and marksmanship is one of my hobbies.

But I am having a hard time finding a legitimate use for this firearm. It just looks like trouble waiting for a place to happen.

Maybe, but most criminals/militia nuts won't be able to afford it.


I understand your point, but Timothy McVeigh must have needed at least a few grand to buy a truck full of fertilizer and park it in Oklahoma. Somehow I get the feeling that $20K isn't out of the question for a group of whackos.
 
2013-05-18 11:57:29 AM

Johnson: pastorkius:  It runs Linux.  Does the average criminal know Linux?


Prompt commands are suspicious

Campus Police: Linux users are criminals


Touche
 
Displayed 50 of 131 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report