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(BBC)   China finds yet another way to surpass America   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 115
    More: Interesting, Chinese Communist Party, Chinese, instant noodles  
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18937 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 May 2013 at 12:00 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-17 09:12:25 PM
FTFA: Many in China say they are treated like second-class citizens when they travel abroad and local media is full of stories of Chinese tourists who have been robbed, our correspondent adds.

Isn't that cute? They see themselves as victims. They really are becoming just like us.

/of course I guess that makes sense
//it's our money and our jobs we're sending over there that are giving them their newfound wealth
 
2013-05-17 09:32:03 PM
Hey Big Ben, George Washington says KISS MY ASS!  USA!  USA!  USA!
 
2013-05-17 09:53:18 PM
This has never been more appropriate:


i.qkme.me
 
2013-05-17 09:53:55 PM
This has never been more appropriate: i.qkme.me
 
2013-05-17 09:54:59 PM

Apos: This has never been more appropriate: [i.qkme.me image 579x300]


Oops....Double post. Take it away, mods!
 
2013-05-17 09:58:02 PM

Apos: Apos: This has never been more appropriate: [i.qkme.me image 579x300]

Oops....Double post. Take it away, mods!


No, let them stay...like all those multiples of Chinese people in the world.
 
2013-05-17 10:02:43 PM
ftfa
"Wang Yang, one of China's four vice-prime ministers "
"Mr. Wang"
"Mr. Wang"
"Mr. Wang"
"Mr. Wang"

After some google-fu I learned that in eastern name ordering, the family name precedes the given name. I can't believe I didn't know this until now.

/And here I just thought they liked saying Wang.
 
2013-05-17 10:45:42 PM
Wang Yang. That's a made up name, right?
 
2013-05-17 11:40:14 PM
Among problems he singled out were talking loudly in public and spitting.

It's not the talking loudly, it's the spitting.  I lived in Hong Kong for a few years and spent a lot of time on the mainland, and the Chinese spit like it's bad luck to swallow your saliva.  It definitely took some getting used to.

They'd also fart audibly without excusing themselves.  I think that was more a native Cantonese cultural trait, but riding a bus was a real trip in every sense of the word.  You could be sitting next to a semi-attractive 30-something professional woman and she'd shiat her pants right next to you with absolutely no acknowledgement whatsoever that the fermented cabbage-and-fish smell killing everyone else on the bus came from her.  They also let their children pee everywhere.  Six year old kid has to take a leak?  Why not do it on the sidewalk next to the outdoor cafe?
 
2013-05-17 11:51:59 PM
I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over
 
2013-05-18 12:08:33 AM

insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over


Same here in Austin, TX. Asians cluster together. I don't have any problem with that though as they do not cause problems, have very good restaurants, and are more polite than your average person. Carry on!
 
2013-05-18 12:10:54 AM

shanrick: Wang Yang. That's a made up name, right?


costumenetwork.com

/He has a wife you know
 
2013-05-18 12:11:32 AM
Don't forget cutting in line as well as something I have noticed from Chinese tourists.  There is no such thing as a line to many Chinese tourists and they will simply ignore everyone waiting to get to what they want.
 
2013-05-18 12:13:28 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-18 12:14:07 AM

insano: Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over


I think you accidentally ended your CSB a little too abruptly.

Go on...
 
2013-05-18 12:14:34 AM

bmihura: insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over

Same here in Austin, TX. Asians cluster together. I don't have any problem with that though as they do not cause problems, have very good restaurants, and are more polite than your average person. Carry on!



Yea, its probably typical of 1st generation immigrants -- stick together when possible.  Its harmless enough and -- for those who stay -- will pass in successive generations.  In the mean time it means that some good restaurants will spring up to cater to their expat communities.
 
2013-05-18 12:16:20 AM
Newsflash:

Not everybody likes tourists, for a variety of reasons.
 
2013-05-18 12:18:14 AM

Daedalus27: Don't forget cutting in line as well as something I have noticed from Chinese tourists.  There is no such thing as a line to many Chinese tourists and they will simply ignore everyone waiting to get to what they want.


My own personal hell would be having to board a 747 to China over and over and over and over...

Its like the Southwest cattle-call but with twice as many people who are many times more aggressively pushy.  On the plus side, its the only place outside a hockey rink where its socially acceptable to body check someone, so there is that (and when in Rome...).
 
2013-05-18 12:19:42 AM
Tip #1457: Going to a Petsmart and asking the workers there that you'll "have a little of this, and a little of that one over there" is not a good idea.
 
2013-05-18 12:19:53 AM
did they start putting buffalo sauce on the chickity china Chinese chicken wings?
 
2013-05-18 12:23:28 AM
When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.
 
2013-05-18 12:24:05 AM
If they dont wish to be treated as second-class citizens perhaps they shouldnt be so rude and actually tip?
 
2013-05-18 12:25:38 AM

fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.


Sorry, the correct answer is Germans.

After that, its neck and neck between Australians and Americans.
 
2013-05-18 12:27:06 AM
It's interesting this is from the BBC since the British surpassed Americans as the worst tourists years ago.
 
2013-05-18 12:35:43 AM
"As (we) get richer, our behavior gets worse."

How true it seems.
 
2013-05-18 12:36:27 AM

insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over


not growing up in a cultural melting pot is much different than growing up where the bulk of the population are damn near clones. same holiday, same tradition, blah blah. many cultures do the 'birds of a feather flock together' trip when they migrate to 'merica. and while a few lucky pasty white boys may get a taste of imported nookie the bulk of those birds that marry do so within their own cultural confines. i just wish they'd stop the pee pee in our Coke.
 
2013-05-18 12:36:56 AM
"Mr Wang's criticism has brought a mixed response on Weibo, China's version of Twitter"

I didn't even know Chinese were into  Japanese culture/anime/manga


/what do you mean weibo isn't an alternate spelling of weeaboo?
 
2013-05-18 12:37:04 AM

Daedalus27: Don't forget cutting in line as well as something I have noticed from Chinese tourists.  There is no such thing as a line to many Chinese tourists and they will simply ignore everyone waiting to get to what they want.


Yeah...Chinese cuts.  I remember those.
 
2013-05-18 12:37:08 AM
I don't get how anyone would enjoy travelling in large groups like that. Planning a trip and exploring are the best parts.
 
2013-05-18 12:38:32 AM

insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over


The mother of a chinese ex-girlfriend I had has been living, and working, in suburban American for 30 years and she doesn't speak one word of English.  30. Farking. Years.  That is dedication.
 
2013-05-18 12:39:40 AM
What really bugs the hell out of me is when they decide to play joke and I have to shell out for a replacement cola.
 
2013-05-18 12:41:31 AM

jshine: Yea, its probably typical of 1st generation immigrants -- stick together when possible.  Its harmless enough and -- for those who stay -- will pass in successive generations.  In the mean time it means that some good restaurants will spring up to cater to their expat communities.


I don't know. There's something to be said about the benefits of experiencing other ways of life than your own. Creating closed-off pockets of only Chinese people and Chinese culture says that they don't care about understanding people other than themselves. I find that fairly rude in itself.

The saying isn't "When in Rome, do as the Chinese have always done and don't associate with the Romans."
 
2013-05-18 12:44:10 AM

jshine: bmihura: insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over

Same here in Austin, TX. Asians cluster together. I don't have any problem with that though as they do not cause problems, have very good restaurants, and are more polite than your average person. Carry on!


Yea, its probably typical of 1st generation immigrants -- stick together when possible.  Its harmless enough and -- for those who stay -- will pass in successive generations.  In the mean time it means that some good restaurants will spring up to cater to their expat communities.


I am long past being a college student, but I still pick up one of the University of Wisconsin student newspapers at the coffeeshop when available.  They ran an article a month or two ago regarding the insularity of the Asian student population.  From what I remember, some would like to venture out and interact more with other cultural groups, but there is distinct peer and familial pressure not to do so.  Most of these students are here just to go back home with a degree, not to expand their perspectives, let alone experience all that (debauchery) Madtown has to offer.
 
2013-05-18 12:47:41 AM
I watched Connie Chung on the TV once.
 
2013-05-18 12:50:09 AM
I read the whole page with a chinese accent in my head.
 
2013-05-18 12:50:24 AM

Lsherm: Among problems he singled out were talking loudly in public and spitting.

It's not the talking loudly, it's the spitting.  I lived in Hong Kong for a few years and spent a lot of time on the mainland, and the Chinese spit like it's bad luck to swallow your saliva.  It definitely took some getting used to.


It's not about saliva, in my experience.  My mother-in-law will hawk-and-spit in the shower.  No, that should be hawk, hawk, hawk and spit.  It's about getting phlem out - sharing it with everyone else in the process.  It may vary per region, but my wife is from Beijing and that city has nasty air.

Daedalus27: Don't forget cutting in line as well as something I have noticed from Chinese tourists.  There is no such thing as a line to many Chinese tourists and they will simply ignore everyone waiting to get to what they want.


Funny.  In 1999 my obviously pregnant wife and I were leaving Beijing.  For whatever reason, I was elsewhere briefly while my wife got in line for the boarding area.  When I went to join her, some European looking fellow behind her took offense, figuring I was cutting in line, and shoved my shoulder gently.  I studiously ignored him and then held my wife's hand.  Later near our gate, he passed by and said a subdued "sorry", which I ignored.

Come to think of it, I was probably the rudest party.  In that last encounter, I should have said something like "no problem, man."
 
2013-05-18 12:51:39 AM
i.ytimg.com

"Now you're a guest here, Wang, so whatever you do dont mention that you're Jewish.

/ all right
// ok
 
2013-05-18 12:51:42 AM

"Many in China say they are treated like second-class citizens when they travel abroad and local media is full of stories of Chinese tourists who have been robbed, our correspondent adds."


About that. Maybe they should go over to Tripadvisor to read how all tourists are robbed and treated like second-class citizens. Go to any restaurant in the tourist areas of Prague and they will rip you off every which way they can think of, doesn't matter where you're from. And didn't all the workers in Paris' Louvre walk off the job because pickpocketing was so bad there even the workers were getting robbed? I'm not sure what the Chinese tourists want or expect, streets paved in spit?

 
2013-05-18 12:57:02 AM
fark, when I worked at a theme park whose name rhymes with "flea hurled", the behavior of the Brazilian tourists was so bad that they were informed they would be disinvited unless they adhered more closely to American cultural standards when they were here.
 
2013-05-18 01:02:59 AM

buckler: fark, when I worked at a theme park whose name rhymes with "flea hurled", the behavior of the Brazilian tourists was so bad that they were informed they would be disinvited unless they adhered more closely to American cultural standards when they were here.


That's a lot of tourists
 
2013-05-18 01:07:54 AM

RatOmeter: It's not about saliva, in my experience.  My mother-in-law will hawk-and-spit in the shower.  No, that should be hawk, hawk, hawk and spit.  It's about getting phlem out - sharing it with everyone else in the process.  It may vary per region, but my wife is from Beijing and that city has nasty air.


Oh, I took to wearing the air mask when I was in Beijing:

img191.imageshack.us

Air quality is piss poor everywhere in China.  One problem is that the spitting becomes a habit, and people will do it even if they don't have to.  The other problem is that spitting is more culturally accepted by the Chinese than it is in the rest of the world.
 
2013-05-18 01:24:46 AM

cmb53208: If they dont wish to be treated as second-class citizens perhaps they shouldnt be so rude and actually tip?


i3.kym-cdn.com media.tumblr.com

/just to be safe
 
2013-05-18 01:35:52 AM
Did somebody just say "weeaboo?"
 
2013-05-18 01:40:19 AM

Lsherm: Among problems he singled out were talking loudly in public and spitting.

It's not the talking loudly, it's the spitting.  I lived in Hong Kong for a few years and spent a lot of time on the mainland, and the Chinese spit like it's bad luck to swallow your saliva.  It definitely took some getting used to.

They'd also fart audibly without excusing themselves.  I think that was more a native Cantonese cultural trait, but riding a bus was a real trip in every sense of the word.  You could be sitting next to a semi-attractive 30-something professional woman and she'd shiat her pants right next to you with absolutely no acknowledgement whatsoever that the fermented cabbage-and-fish smell killing everyone else on the bus came from her.  They also let their children pee everywhere.  Six year old kid has to take a leak?  Why not do it on the sidewalk next to the outdoor cafe?


That's strange to me, because that's exactly my impression of the Chinese as well.

However, recently there was a story in a Danish newspapers about a busfull of Danes, that for some reason where in China, who had their bus stop on the highway, in dense traffic, and urinated. All of them at once, they drunk of course.

This caused a scandal in China, and I wondered why. Was it because you're supposed your pants discreetly? I can see how perhaps the scene was somewhat frightening to the Chinese, with 30+ drunk Danes whipping their penis, but still...
 
2013-05-18 01:49:34 AM
I have no problem with most Chinese cultural mores. I lived with a Chinese family for 6 months and got used to a lot of the culture. But they need to learn how to get in a farking line.

That shiat is rude and unacceptable.
 
2013-05-18 01:50:10 AM
www.blogcdn.com
api.ning.com
secrethealthychocolateblog.com
www.globalpost.com
assets.nydailynews.com

Your move, China.
 
2013-05-18 01:50:37 AM

illannoyin: shanrick: Wang Yang. That's a made up name, right?



/He has a wife you know


Good old fark. Not a day goes by without a monty python reference.
 
2013-05-18 01:52:52 AM
Spawn73:   However, recently there was a story in a Danish newspapers about a busfull of Danes, that for some reason where in China, who had their bus stop on the highway, in dense traffic, and urinated. All of them at once, they drunk of course.

This caused a scandal in China, and I wondered why. Was it because you're supposed your pants discreetly? I can see how perhaps the scene was somewhat frightening to the Chinese, with 30+ drunk Danes whipping their penis, but still...


Really?  You wonder why?  It was in the middle of a busy freeway system with several foreigners not giving a damn about pissing in public in front of everyone.  Its not their country, so I dunno - sort of a f--k you gesture, if you ask me.

I doubt such a gesture would go over to well on a US highway either.
 
2013-05-18 01:59:49 AM

MurphyMurphy: ftfa
"Wang Yang, one of China's four vice-prime ministers "
"Mr. Wang"
"Mr. Wang"
"Mr. Wang"
"Mr. Wang"

After some google-fu I learned that in eastern name ordering, the family name precedes the given name. I can't believe I didn't know this until now.

/And here I just thought they liked saying Wang.


Yea, the first couple of weeks I worked at my (primarily) Chinese company, that part wasn't easy to remember. It works both ways though. As often as I mistakenly called someone by their surname, they mistakenly called me by my last name. Nobody seems to mind though. And in Mandarin when you use "mister", the mister goes after the surname: name  先生
 
2013-05-18 02:05:08 AM
Everybody Wang Chung tonight ;)

img.cache.vevo.com
 
2013-05-18 02:13:56 AM

Lsherm: RatOmeter: It's not about saliva, in my experience.  My mother-in-law will hawk-and-spit in the shower.  No, that should be hawk, hawk, hawk and spit.  It's about getting phlem out - sharing it with everyone else in the process.  It may vary per region, but my wife is from Beijing and that city has nasty air.

Oh, I took to wearing the air mask when I was in Beijing:

Air quality is piss poor everywhere in China.  One problem is that the spitting becomes a habit, and people will do it even if they don't have to.  The other problem is that spitting is more culturally accepted by the Chinese than it is in the rest of the world.


The first time I went to Beijing I was in a taxi and looked out over the city to what I thought was thick fog.

It wasn't fog.

Stayed in a Sofitel which was extremely nice but I thought it was telling that in amongst the usual hotel items in the wardrobe (bathrobe, safe, etc) was a full on gas mask in a canister. I guess it could have been used in case of fire, but looking out the window at the "fog", I would not be surprised if it was just there to allow you to breathe outside.

Really interesting country tho. Sure there are good and bad aspects, but that's the way with every country really.
 
2013-05-18 02:17:38 AM

SirEattonHogg: Spawn73:   However, recently there was a story in a Danish newspapers about a busfull of Danes, that for some reason where in China, who had their bus stop on the highway, in dense traffic, and urinated. All of them at once, they drunk of course.

This caused a scandal in China, and I wondered why. Was it because you're supposed your pants discreetly? I can see how perhaps the scene was somewhat frightening to the Chinese, with 30+ drunk Danes whipping their penis, but still...

Really?  You wonder why?  It was in the middle of a busy freeway system with several foreigners not giving a damn about pissing in public in front of everyone.  Its not their country, so I dunno - sort of a f--k you gesture, if you ask me.

I doubt such a gesture would go over to well on a US highway either.


Danish alcohol culture, to a large extend, is such that the behaviour would be  tolerated because, hey, alcohol was involved.

I know when in Rome and all that. I was just wondering with the stories about the Chineses view on bodyfunctions, why they wrote a scathing article about it, then afterwards tried, without success, to track them down.
 
2013-05-18 02:18:24 AM

bmihura: insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over

Same here in Austin, TX. Asians cluster together. I don't have any problem with that though as they do not cause problems, have very good restaurants, and are more polite than your average person. Carry on!


It's not immigration.  It's colonization.  Don't believe me?  Do you remember the Torch Running for the Beijing Olympics?
 
2013-05-18 02:24:37 AM
Wang Yang.  Hehehehe.
His name is Wang Yang.

I don't think the world can handle even a mere 10% of the Chinese travelling the world. Resources are strained enough as it is. There's just too farking many of them. They need to stay in their little cancerous wasteland that they've built.

Teehee.  Wang Yang.
 
2013-05-18 02:33:08 AM
spawn73:
This caused a scandal in China, and I wondered why. Was it because you're supposed your pants discreetly? I can see how perhaps the scene was somewhat frightening to the Chinese, with 30+ drunk Danes whipping their penis, but still...


They feared that they were finally getting retaliation for the countless cokes ruined by their compatriots.

Yes, that joke has been made about a dozen times in this thread and every other Chinese thread, but it never stops being funny to me.
 
2013-05-18 02:56:01 AM

SpinStopper: Everybody Wang Chung tonight ;)

[img.cache.vevo.com image 640x360]


Has nothing to do with the Chinese culture.  The "Wang Chung" is based on the sound a guitar makes when it is strummed. Know your 80's New Wave bands...
 
2013-05-18 03:03:06 AM

BuckTurgidson: [www.blogcdn.com image 240x360]
[api.ning.com image 420x297]
[secrethealthychocolateblog.com image 500x352]
[www.globalpost.com image 360x240]
[assets.nydailynews.com image 635x438]

Your move, China.


If we hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes should fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.

i149.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-18 03:06:11 AM

insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over


Here we go again, with 1 anecdote turning into a trait for millions/billions of people.

First, they haven't been more than 1 block because they probably don't know how to drive. Going anywhere requires lots of social interaction which is very difficult if your language is poor. Most of shopping at malls is drivable only and walking distance restaurant and shops require lots of language interaction.

Second, they only go to Chinese grocery because let's face it, American grocery is basically processed food and the produce is low quality and expensive. And, eating food from regular grocery stores is a straight highway to OB-city. Same with fast food and most restaurants. I've seen Chinese who venture out into pizza and wings and gain 50lbs in a semester.

The Chinese I know watch US TV religiously to improve on their English skills. They really want to speak English to native speakers but yeah, speaking to a Chinese with weak English skills will get you frustrated in seconds.


Besides, have you met Americans in a foreign country? They don't speak a lick of the local language or attempt to learn it, stick to other Americans socially and have that attitude that everything American is better anyway and so why bother with the local stuff.

// Though lots of exceptions.
 
2013-05-18 03:17:09 AM

sonorangal: SpinStopper: Everybody Wang Chung tonight ;)

[img.cache.vevo.com image 640x360]

Has nothing to do with the Chinese culture.  The "Wang Chung" is based on the sound a guitar makes when it is strummed. Know your 80's New Wave bands...


Shaddup.  I was just having fun.  Wing Dang Ding Dong ;)
 
2013-05-18 03:48:09 AM
Surpass us in being hated?  Are you kidding?  Those amateurs aren't even close.  If you list "talking loudly" as one of your worst problems, forget being in the same league, you aren't even playing the same game.
 
2013-05-18 04:12:08 AM

Bumblefark: fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.

Sorry, the correct answer is Germans.

After that, its neck and neck between Australians and Americans.


Germans are bad, but you've obviously never encountered any Russians on holiday.
 
2013-05-18 04:25:11 AM

mr0x: Besides, have you met Americans in a foreign country? They don't speak a lick of the local language or attempt to learn it, stick to other Americans socially and have that attitude that everything American is better anyway and so why bother with the local stuff.


You never really appreciate your country until you go someplace that doesn't have the common courtesy to speak English. And some of their McDonalds have weird crap on the menu!
 
2013-05-18 04:27:44 AM
They polluted a body of water large enough to set the entire ocean on fire?

click
 
2013-05-18 04:33:32 AM

Lsherm: Among problems he singled out were talking loudly in public and spitting.

It's not the talking loudly, it's the spitting.  I lived in Hong Kong for a few years and spent a lot of time on the mainland, and the Chinese spit like it's bad luck to swallow your saliva.  It definitely took some getting used to.

They'd also fart audibly without excusing themselves.  I think that was more a native Cantonese cultural trait, but riding a bus was a real trip in every sense of the word.  You could be sitting next to a semi-attractive 30-something professional woman and she'd shiat her pants right next to you with absolutely no acknowledgement whatsoever that the fermented cabbage-and-fish smell killing everyone else on the bus came from her.  They also let their children pee everywhere.  Six year old kid has to take a leak?  Why not do it on the sidewalk next to the outdoor cafe?


There was a lot of news coverage in Hong Kong on the amount of mainlanders travelling down putting a real strain on the infrastructure in Hong Kong after the handover. A lot of them cross the border bootlegging *real* goods back into mainland China. Stuff like infant formula is sold on the grey market for twice the price, because in the mainland, nobody trusts the stuff available from the shops. Then you have people going down from the mainland to give birth on tourist visas to get HK citizenship and a lot of time skipping town when the hospital bill comes.

That stuff you usually don't see, but on the streets the problem is with mainland tourists behaving badly. You've got people pushing and shoving to get into luxury shops. You have parents letting their children pee everywhere, even on the metro (MTR). It's a good thing HK doesn't use third rail electrification otherwise that would darwintastic. I'm not saying that all HK people behave well, but it's very likely most of the peeing (and a lot of other bad behaviour) can be attributed to this phenomenon.
 
2013-05-18 04:37:04 AM
Okay, I looked. We need coaches like that for our own domestic population.

The Ad Council needs to run a "don't be an asshole" series.

#1 People don't want to listen to your farking radio with your door open while you run into the liquor store, and they don't want to listen to your bullshiat blasting at the red light, and for the love of FSM, man, don't bring in some mobile blasting device to Wal-Mart like you are trying to bring back the boom box.

Next on our Ad Council series...Cooperative driving would work if only YOU would try it...don't be an asshole.
 
2013-05-18 05:53:07 AM

BuckTurgidson: [www.blogcdn.com image 240x360]
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[secrethealthychocolateblog.com image 500x352]
[www.globalpost.com image 360x240]
[assets.nydailynews.com image 635x438]

Your move, China.


Why are we getting help from Russia?
 
2013-05-18 06:37:18 AM
FTFA: Many in China say they are treated like second-class citizens when they travel abroad and local media is full of stories of Chinese tourists who have been robbed, our correspondent adds.
Earlier this year, officials in China's eastern province of Jiangsu warned citizens against carrying large amounts of money with them or flashing expensive jewellery.


This has nothing to do with them being Chinese. This has everything to do with them being tourists. This happens to tourists from every country no matter where they travel.
 
2013-05-18 07:18:50 AM
Among problems he singled out were talking loudly in public and spitting.

So pretty much acting like American movie theater goers?
 
2013-05-18 07:41:41 AM
To a Han Chinese, all other ethnicities are barbarians.  The education they receive in their homes and in schools only serves to reinforce this fact.  Chinese chicks are pretty cute, tho.
 
2013-05-18 08:07:42 AM
Have come across them twice - once, at Phi Phil Island in Phuket, during an extremely awkward moment in the men's toilet (uh, guys - I'm a Westerner in bathing trunks.  I realise this is an unusual sight but this whole staring thing is weird and creepy), and then a week ago on the Universal Studios tour in LA where the concept of sitting down when asked seems to an alien concept.  Good times.

/csb
 
2013-05-18 08:31:22 AM

Lsherm: Among problems he singled out were talking loudly in public and spitting.

It's not the talking loudly, it's the spitting.  I lived in Hong Kong for a few years and spent a lot of time on the mainland, and the Chinese spit like it's bad luck to swallow your saliva.  It definitely took some getting used to.

They'd also fart audibly without excusing themselves.  I think that was more a native Cantonese cultural trait, but riding a bus was a real trip in every sense of the word.  You could be sitting next to a semi-attractive 30-something professional woman and she'd shiat her pants right next to you with absolutely no acknowledgement whatsoever that the fermented cabbage-and-fish smell killing everyone else on the bus came from her.  They also let their children pee everywhere.  Six year old kid has to take a leak?  Why not do it on the sidewalk next to the outdoor cafe?


I learned on Fark that baby pants have an open crotch, so the kid just shiats wherever it happens to be. I think of that every time I am cleaning up after my dog.
 
2013-05-18 08:42:00 AM
Weirdly enough, Chinese tourists in London are amongst the best behaved. This may be because they're wealthy (owing to the visa system) and wealthier Chinese people appear to be adopting upper-middle class European social mores/dress/speech patterns with enthusiasm, as echoed in the value placed on English English TEFL tutors and governesses.

If you really want to get annoyed by rude, ignorant, foreigners, spend some time amongst the pudgy middle eastern tweens and their pushy, loud, obnoxious grandmothers in SW1.
 
2013-05-18 09:03:18 AM

namegoeshere: Lsherm: Among problems he singled out were talking loudly in public and spitting.

It's not the talking loudly, it's the spitting.  I lived in Hong Kong for a few years and spent a lot of time on the mainland, and the Chinese spit like it's bad luck to swallow your saliva.  It definitely took some getting used to.

They'd also fart audibly without excusing themselves.  I think that was more a native Cantonese cultural trait, but riding a bus was a real trip in every sense of the word.  You could be sitting next to a semi-attractive 30-something professional woman and she'd shiat her pants right next to you with absolutely no acknowledgement whatsoever that the fermented cabbage-and-fish smell killing everyone else on the bus came from her.  They also let their children pee everywhere.  Six year old kid has to take a leak?  Why not do it on the sidewalk next to the outdoor cafe?

I learned on Fark that baby pants have an open crotch, so the kid just shiats wherever it happens to be. I think of that every time I am cleaning up after my dog.


=====================

Before WWII, this was common in lots of countries, even in rural parts of Europe.
 
2013-05-18 09:06:24 AM
Sadly we are seeing tons of the rude, loud, and destructive Chinese here in Chiang Mai. The #1 grossing movie in China is called "Lost in Chiang Mai" so they're flooding here. While there are plenty of wonderful Chinese tourists the obnoxious ones are making a very bad stereotype. A few people who run guesthouses have had to make major repairs to rooms, fight over people not paying, stealing, sneaking people into rooms etc. Some have even contemplated that having a no Chinese policy may save them money due to the repairs and other tourists leaving.

Hope the growing stereotype doesn't stick :/
 
2013-05-18 09:12:57 AM

insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over


=============

I grew up in New Jersey.   NJ has a very large Asian population -- Indians, Koreans, Chinese, even a fair number of Japanese.  Newly arrived immigrants behave pretty much as you described.  From what I can tell, it's a combination of fear, embarrassment, family pressure, etc.   From my observation, the first gen US born behave more like white American kids, than white American kids.  I knew more than a few Harry and Kumar types.
 
2013-05-18 09:18:43 AM

blackartemis: Sadly we are seeing tons of the rude, loud, and destructive Chinese here in Chiang Mai. The #1 grossing movie in China is called "Lost in Chiang Mai" so they're flooding here. While there are plenty of wonderful Chinese tourists the obnoxious ones are making a very bad stereotype. A few people who run guesthouses have had to make major repairs to rooms, fight over people not paying, stealing, sneaking people into rooms etc. Some have even contemplated that having a no Chinese policy may save them money due to the repairs and other tourists leaving.

Hope the growing stereotype doesn't stick :/


That's a shame.  Chiang Mai is beautiful.  Brtis and Yanks have had a monopoly on obnoxiousness there for years.
 
2013-05-18 09:29:13 AM

TheHumanCannonball: Germans are bad, but you've obviously never encountered any Russians on holiday.


This would be correct. I worked as a retail slave near a major cruise line port, and the majority of Russian tourists I encountered were not only rude and obnoxious, they also bathed maybe twice a year.
 
2013-05-18 09:33:31 AM

TomD9938: "Now you're a guest here, Wang, so whatever you do dont mention that you're Jewish.

/ all right
// ok


Came here for the Caddyshack reference.

"Hey, orange balls!"
 
2013-05-18 09:52:27 AM

dpaul007: TheHumanCannonball: Germans are bad, but you've obviously never encountered any Russians on holiday.

This would be correct. I worked as a retail slave near a major cruise line port, and the majority of Russian tourists I encountered were not only rude and obnoxious, they also bathed maybe twice a year.


I've always wondered if folks who live in other countries and encounter Western tourists remark to each other, "Smell that! Those crazy foreigners must shower once or twice a DAY! How odd."
 
2013-05-18 10:05:19 AM

shanrick: Wang Yang. That's a made up name, right?


It's pronounced "Wong Yong"

Funny side note, I just went to Chins for a few weeks and virtually everyone would stare and point or suddenly grab their friend's head and turn it in my direction to look.

These were like zombie stares, no emotion and they would look at me for as long as I was in view.

I wasn't sure if they felt threatened by my western presence or if they had never seen a white man before. On a side note high school girls would come up to me and smile and try their best to speak English which consisted of "hello, where are you from?" and that was all.

I think I came back with that new bird flu so if it comes to America, your welcome.
 
2013-05-18 10:05:26 AM

stiletto_the_wise: dpaul007: TheHumanCannonball: Germans are bad, but you've obviously never encountered any Russians on holiday.

This would be correct. I worked as a retail slave near a major cruise line port, and the majority of Russian tourists I encountered were not only rude and obnoxious, they also bathed maybe twice a year.

I've always wondered if folks who live in other countries and encounter Western tourists remark to each other, "Smell that! Those crazy foreigners must shower once or twice a DAY! How odd."


================

I remember some years ago when British hotel owners were complaining that Americans bathed so much they were causing problems with the antiquated English water and sewer systems.
 
2013-05-18 11:07:50 AM

mr0x: insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over

Here we go again, with 1 anecdote turning into a trait for millions/billions of people.

First, they haven't been more than 1 block because they probably don't know how to drive. Going anywhere requires lots of social interaction which is very difficult if your language is poor. Most of shopping at malls is drivable only and walking distance restaurant and shops require lots of language interaction.

Second, they only go to Chinese grocery because let's face it, American grocery is basically processed food and the produce is low quality and expensive. And, eating food from regular grocery stores is a straight highway to OB-city. Same with fast food and most restaurants. I've seen Chinese who venture out into pizza and wings and gain 50lbs in a semester.

The Chinese I know watch US TV religiously to improve on their English skills. They really want to speak English to native speakers but yeah, speaking to a Chinese with weak English skills will get you frustrated in seconds.


Besides, have you met Americans in a foreign country? They don't speak a lick of the local language or atte ...


Speaking as someone who has lived abroad in a few different places this is entirely untrue. There are people that don't want to learn the language and there are people that do. The spread across nationalities is fairly even as far as I've seen. Now, if you're going to other countries and hanging around expat bars you'll get a different impression.
 
2013-05-18 11:28:33 AM

TheHumanCannonball: Bumblefark: fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.

Sorry, the correct answer is Germans.

After that, its neck and neck between Australians and Americans.

Germans are bad, but you've obviously never encountered any Russians on holiday.


Israelis.

After their mandatory stint in the army they grow dreadlocks and head to Asia to complain about how everything is so expensive.
 
2013-05-18 11:31:07 AM

mr0x: insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over

Here we go again, with 1 anecdote turning into a trait for millions/billions of people.

First, they haven't been more than 1 block because they probably don't know how to drive. Going anywhere requires lots of social interaction which is very difficult if your language is poor. Most of shopping at malls is drivable only and walking distance restaurant and shops require lots of language interaction.

Second, they only go to Chinese grocery because let's face it, American grocery is basically processed food and the produce is low quality and expensive. And, eating food from regular grocery stores is a straight highway to OB-city. Same with fast food and most restaurants. I've seen Chinese who venture out into pizza and wings and gain 50lbs in a semester.

The Chinese I know watch US TV religiously to improve on their English skills. They really want to speak English to native speakers but yeah, speaking to a Chinese with weak English skills will get you frustrated in seconds.


Besides, have you met Americans in a foreign country? They don't speak a lick of the local language or atte ...


You were so eager to jump on someone for generalizing that you missed where I said 'the chinese people I know,' and not 'all chinese people.'  My point was that I would prefer rude tourists to completely shut-off foreigners. And you're wrong on most other points: he owns a car, a toyota corolla and drives it to and from the asian grocery store, badly I might add. But there's no surprise there (see now I'm stereotyping). He doesn't socialize or participate with Americans because he's just biding his time to go back to China, not because he feels cut-off.
 
2013-05-18 11:42:28 AM

fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.


They are until you smile and give them a Vegemite sandwich.
 
2013-05-18 11:44:38 AM

Bumblefark: fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.

Sorry, the correct answer is Germans.

After that, its neck and neck between Australians and Americans.


I always heard that it was the Israelis.  But to be honest, when I'm in another country, I don't really pay much attention to what the other non-natives are doing.
 
2013-05-18 11:57:50 AM

acereraser: jshine: bmihura: insano: I don't know what's worse, rude tourists or visitors with complete apathy and even disdain for their surroundings.
The Chinese people I know in America (all graduate students) have zero desire to have any sort of cultural experience while living here. My Chinese friend and his wife  haven't ventured outside a two-block radius of their apartment in three years of grad school. When they socialize, it's only with other Chinese people; when they eat, it's only at Chinese restaurants; when they shop, it's only at the Asian grocery store.They watch only Chinese tv online and when they do, it's Chinese spin-offs of European or American shows (see Voice of China). I did come out with us to see a movie once; it was Life of Pi and he saw it only because it had a Chinese director.

Chicks from Hong Kong are freaks in bed though, so they've got that going for them, which is nice.

/CSB over

Same here in Austin, TX. Asians cluster together. I don't have any problem with that though as they do not cause problems, have very good restaurants, and are more polite than your average person. Carry on!


Yea, its probably typical of 1st generation immigrants -- stick together when possible.  Its harmless enough and -- for those who stay -- will pass in successive generations.  In the mean time it means that some good restaurants will spring up to cater to their expat communities.

I am long past being a college student, but I still pick up one of the University of Wisconsin student newspapers at the coffeeshop when available.  They ran an article a month or two ago regarding the insularity of the Asian student population.  From what I remember, some would like to venture out and interact more with other cultural groups, but there is distinct peer and familial pressure not to do so.  Most of these students are here just to go back home with a degree, not to expand their perspectives, let alone experience all that (debauchery) Madtown has to offer.


Interesting - I met my Chinese wife at UW Madison. She came there originally when she was 6 and her dad was a grad student.
 
2013-05-18 12:00:12 PM

ciberido: Bumblefark: fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.

Sorry, the correct answer is Germans.

After that, its neck and neck between Australians and Americans.

I always heard that it was the Israelis.  But to be honest, when I'm in another country, I don't really pay much attention to what the other non-natives are doing.


I have, but only because I found that being mistaken for another nationality can dramatically alter how you are treated -- for better or for worse. Long story short:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

/Canadians: the other inoffensive white meat.
 
2013-05-18 12:03:01 PM

insano: You were so eager to jump on someone for generalizing that you missed where I said 'the chinese people I know,' and not 'all chinese people.' My point was that I would prefer rude tourists to completely shut-off foreigners. And you're wrong on most other points: he owns a car, a toyota corolla and drives it to and from the asian grocery store, badly I might add. But there's no surprise there (see now I'm stereotyping). He doesn't socialize or participate with Americans because he's just biding his time to go back to China, not because he feels cut-off.


The Chinese I have "known" when I lived in student housing were pretty much the same. There was a Chinese man who lived 2 doors over for about 2 years. He barely spoke English, let alone Dutch. Where every other nationality has the door to the hallway open when they are at home, and don't mind company, I have never seen a Chinese who didn't close (and sometimes even lock) the door as soon as (s)he got home. But the Chinese do care for the opinion of the group. I only had to ask once if a guy would please stop making a fermented fish dish at 7 AM.
 
rka
2013-05-18 12:03:19 PM

Bumblefark: Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."


What a sad, sad thing to do.
 
2013-05-18 12:16:35 PM

rka: Bumblefark: Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

What a sad, sad thing to do.


Which? Claiming to be Canadian, or not claiming to be American?

...'cause I might be able to grant the former. As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.
 
rka
2013-05-18 12:35:19 PM

Bumblefark: As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.


Good thing there is a whole host of options between cowering behind a Maple Leaf, claiming to be Canadian, and running around yelling "Murica, fark yea". It was just a movie with puppets, not a travel instruction guide.

You know what, just keep claiming you're Canadian. Better for everyone I suspect.
 
2013-05-18 12:39:38 PM

rka: Bumblefark: As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.

Good thing there is a whole host of options between cowering behind a Maple Leaf, claiming to be Canadian, and running around yelling "Murica, fark yea". It was just a movie with puppets, not a travel instruction guide.

You know what, just keep claiming you're Canadian. Better for everyone I suspect.


Heh. Always nice to meet the hyperbole impaired.

You sound like you're fun at parties.
 
2013-05-18 12:54:30 PM
So in addition to "Ugly Americans" we now have "Ugly Chinese"?
 
2013-05-18 02:11:27 PM

rka: Bumblefark: As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.

Good thing there is a whole host of options between cowering behind a Maple Leaf, claiming to be Canadian, and running around yelling "Murica, fark yea". It was just a movie with puppets, not a travel instruction guide.


I only ever had one "bad" experience come from identifying myself as being from the USA, and that was in Pusan, South Korea.  I was walking home one night from a movie theater (which was conveniently located inside a shopping mall).   I had stopped before crossing a street, and this European guy came up to me.  At least, based on his accent and appearance, I assume he was European.  We have a very short dialog:

European guy: America?
Me: I'm from North America, yes.
European guy : But American?  Not Canadian.
Me: I'm from the USA, yes.  Not Canadian.
European guy : Sorry, I don't talk to Americans. [Walks off]

I wouldn't even call it a "bad" experience, really, just weird, especially as I was minding my own business and he started the whole thing.

On a somewhat related note, I try to avoid calling the USA "America" or myself as "American" because there are a number of South Americans who take objection to that.  I got tired of hearing "We are Americans, too!" or "Uruguay is in America!" so I try to avoid the issue by saying "USA" when I'm abroad.
 
2013-05-18 02:38:54 PM
Bumblefark:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

On what experience do you give this advice?
 
2013-05-18 03:02:36 PM

MNguy: Bumblefark:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

On what experience do you give this advice?


Pretty much all of Western Europe, some of Eastern Europe, portions of the Middle East, the North Caribbean, and the South Pacific...never once had a bad reaction to, "Canadian, actually."
 
2013-05-18 03:11:43 PM

ciberido: rka: Bumblefark: As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.

Good thing there is a whole host of options between cowering behind a Maple Leaf, claiming to be Canadian, and running around yelling "Murica, fark yea". It was just a movie with puppets, not a travel instruction guide.

I only ever had one "bad" experience come from identifying myself as being from the USA, and that was in Pusan, South Korea.  I was walking home one night from a movie theater (which was conveniently located inside a shopping mall).   I had stopped before crossing a street, and this European guy came up to me.  At least, based on his accent and appearance, I assume he was European.  We have a very short dialog:

European guy: America?
Me: I'm from North America, yes.
European guy : But American?  Not Canadian.
Me: I'm from the USA, yes.  Not Canadian.
European guy : Sorry, I don't talk to Americans. [Walks off]

I wouldn't even call it a "bad" experience, really, just weird, especially as I was minding my own business and he started the whole thing.

On a somewhat related note, I try to avoid calling the USA "America" or myself as "American" because there are a number of South Americans who take objection to that.  I got tired of hearing "We are Americans, too!" or "Uruguay is in America!" so I try to avoid the issue by saying "USA" when I'm abroad.


Most gratuitous misrepresentation of my nationality:

I convinced a smoking hot French girl who I met in Avignon that I was only educated in the US (thus the accent) in order to convince her to have lunch with me. Think I claimed Iceland. No recollection. All I remember if the smoking hot French girl.

/Sorry, fellow countrymen: I'll disown you in a heartbeat if our poor global image as a nation threatens to get between me and a smoking hot French girl. I just will.
 
2013-05-18 03:49:59 PM

Karl LaFong: So in addition to "Ugly Americans" we now have "Ugly Chinese"?


amazingdata.com

THAT'S WAISIST!!!11!!!
 
2013-05-18 03:55:28 PM

Bumblefark: I convinced a smoking hot French girl who I met in Avignon that I was only educated in the US (thus the accent) in order to convince her to have lunch with me. Think I claimed Iceland. No recollection. All I remember if the smoking hot French girl.


Oh, c'mon, man. Fess up. Did you do her?
 
2013-05-18 04:07:25 PM

Bumblefark: ciberido: rka: Bumblefark: As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.

Good thing there is a whole host of options between cowering behind a Maple Leaf, claiming to be Canadian, and running around yelling "Murica, fark yea". It was just a movie with puppets, not a travel instruction guide.

I only ever had one "bad" experience come from identifying myself as being from the USA, and that was in Pusan, South Korea.  I was walking home one night from a movie theater (which was conveniently located inside a shopping mall).   I had stopped before crossing a street, and this European guy came up to me.  At least, based on his accent and appearance, I assume he was European.  We have a very short dialog:

European guy: America?
Me: I'm from North America, yes.
European guy : But American?  Not Canadian.
Me: I'm from the USA, yes.  Not Canadian.
European guy : Sorry, I don't talk to Americans. [Walks off]

I wouldn't even call it a "bad" experience, really, just weird, especially as I was minding my own business and he started the whole thing.

On a somewhat related note, I try to avoid calling the USA "America" or myself as "American" because there are a number of South Americans who take objection to that.  I got tired of hearing "We are Americans, too!" or "Uruguay is in America!" so I try to avoid the issue by saying "USA" when I'm abroad.

Most gratuitous misrepresentation of my nationality:

I convinced a smoking hot French girl who I met in Avignon that I was only educated in the US (thus the accent) in order to convince her to have lunch with me. Think I claimed Iceland. No recollection. All I remember if the smoking hot French girl.

/Sorry, fellow countrymen: I'll disown you in a heartbeat if our poor global image as a nation threatens to get between me and a smoking hot French girl. I just will.


===============

Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.
 
2013-05-18 04:07:32 PM

Bumblefark: MNguy: Bumblefark:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

On what experience do you give this advice?

Pretty much all of Western Europe, some of Eastern Europe, portions of the Middle East, the North Caribbean, and the South Pacific...never once had a bad reaction to, "Canadian, actually."


Well, good for you. You sound just spineless enough that Eastern Canadia may grant your wish for citizenship.
 
2013-05-18 04:26:29 PM

theorellior: Bumblefark: I convinced a smoking hot French girl who I met in Avignon that I was only educated in the US (thus the accent) in order to convince her to have lunch with me. Think I claimed Iceland. No recollection. All I remember if the smoking hot French girl.

Oh, c'mon, man. Fess up. Did you do her?


What happens in Avignon...

MNguy: Well, good for you. You sound just spineless enough that Eastern Canadia may grant your wish for citizenship.


What a smoking hot French girl might look like:

www.thestyleking.com

But, yeah, some random dude on the interwebs questioning my masculinity and/or patriotism -- file that under, "things that are a source of acute distress for me."

Wanker...
 
2013-05-18 04:38:03 PM
Bumblefark:

But, yeah, some random dude on the interwebs questioning my masculinity and/or patriotism -- file that under, "things that are a source of acute distress for me."

Wanker...


Haha.

Seriously, move to Quebec you pussy.  At least that way you don't have to lie to get yourself a piece.
 
2013-05-18 04:45:16 PM

MNguy: Bumblefark:

But, yeah, some random dude on the interwebs questioning my masculinity and/or patriotism -- file that under, "things that are a source of acute distress for me."

Wanker...

Haha.

Seriously, move to Quebec you pussy.  At least that way you don't have to lie to get yourself a piece.


Sage advice from someone so plainly secure in their masculinity, they had to find a way to shoehorn the word "guy" into their Fark handle, lest any passing stranger not know what a man they are.

Does it work? Does it keep the gay thoughts away?
 
2013-05-18 05:48:37 PM
This is classic yokel stuff. Go to the big shiny city, be dirty and crude, get robbed and taken advantage of.
 
2013-05-18 06:11:05 PM

Bumblefark: MNguy: Bumblefark:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

On what experience do you give this advice?

Pretty much all of Western Europe, some of Eastern Europe, portions of the Middle East, the North Caribbean, and the South Pacific...never once had a bad reaction to, "Canadian, actually."


If this continues, Canadians will be considered the rudest tourists imaginable, just cause of the pretenders.
 
2013-05-18 07:15:33 PM

fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.


No, Quebeckers.
 
2013-05-18 07:47:50 PM
farm3.staticflickr.com

Bill and Martha in China. I found these Americans in Beijing.

In my experience it is intoxicated Europeans that are trouble. Australians rate high as well but it is hard to generalize. I have seen Chinese tour groups in Pyongyang acting crazy because it is cheap. I meet expats abroad who will withdraw into their own kind so Asians will do the same. I find not that many Americans travel independently globally. I have always been met with shock by people who find out I am an American. I have seen all kinds of tourists acting badly but Americans screaming at a ticket clerk in a European train station has been one thing I have noticed frequently.
 
2013-05-18 08:36:20 PM

Farxist Marxist: Bumblefark: MNguy: Bumblefark:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

On what experience do you give this advice?

Pretty much all of Western Europe, some of Eastern Europe, portions of the Middle East, the North Caribbean, and the South Pacific...never once had a bad reaction to, "Canadian, actually."

If this continues, Canadians will be considered the rudest tourists imaginable, just cause of the pretenders.


I would think the Canadians would just be happy just to be noticed for something.

/to be fair, I slandered the fine folks of Iceland as well.
 
2013-05-18 09:26:23 PM

Bumblefark: Farxist Marxist: Bumblefark: MNguy: Bumblefark:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

On what experience do you give this advice?

Pretty much all of Western Europe, some of Eastern Europe, portions of the Middle East, the North Caribbean, and the South Pacific...never once had a bad reaction to, "Canadian, actually."

If this continues, Canadians will be considered the rudest tourists imaginable, just cause of the pretenders.

I would think the Canadians would just be happy just to be noticed for something.

/to be fair, I slandered the fine folks of Iceland as well.


Well, I guess that's ok. However you could have done it in one:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icelandic_Canadian#Communities
 
2013-05-18 09:59:04 PM

Farxist Marxist: Bumblefark: Farxist Marxist: Bumblefark: MNguy: Bumblefark:

Unless you have a 2nd language, the best answer to the question of where you hail from is, "Canada."

On what experience do you give this advice?

Pretty much all of Western Europe, some of Eastern Europe, portions of the Middle East, the North Caribbean, and the South Pacific...never once had a bad reaction to, "Canadian, actually."

If this continues, Canadians will be considered the rudest tourists imaginable, just cause of the pretenders.

I would think the Canadians would just be happy just to be noticed for something.

/to be fair, I slandered the fine folks of Iceland as well.

Well, I guess that's ok. However you could have done it in one:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icelandic_Canadian#Communities


damnit!
 
2013-05-18 10:52:11 PM

ciberido: rka: Bumblefark: As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.

Good thing there is a whole host of options between cowering behind a Maple Leaf, claiming to be Canadian, and running around yelling "Murica, fark yea". It was just a movie with puppets, not a travel instruction guide.

I only ever had one "bad" experience come from identifying myself as being from the USA, and that was in Pusan, South Korea.  I was walking home one night from a movie theater (which was conveniently located inside a shopping mall).   I had stopped before crossing a street, and this European guy came up to me.  At least, based on his accent and appearance, I assume he was European.  We have a very short dialog:

European guy: America?
Me: I'm from North America, yes.
European guy : But American?  Not Canadian.
Me: I'm from the USA, yes.  Not Canadian.
European guy : Sorry, I don't talk to Americans. [Walks off]

I wouldn't even call it a "bad" experience, really, just weird, especially as I was minding my own business and he started the whole thing.

On a somewhat related note, I try to avoid calling the USA "America" or myself as "American" because there are a number of South Americans who take objection to that.  I got tired of hearing "We are Americans, too!" or "Uruguay is in America!" so I try to avoid the issue by saying "USA" when I'm abroad.


Similar experience: I "met" a guy who I believe was Scottish, by this accent, in the elevator in a hotel in Liuzhou China.  I was really tired, just got off a plane and checked into the hotel.  Dude's alone in the lift with me and says very clearly "I wouldn't be caught dead in Americer" (his pronunciation).  I ignored him.
 
2013-05-19 08:43:18 AM

fusillade762: When I was travelling it always seemed like Australians were the most obnoxious tourists. Of course that's just anecdotal.


Gonna guess Bali, Patong or maybe Hawaii.  'cos all the drunk bogans go to those places.

\Patong,....wasn't, uh, great
 
2013-05-19 11:02:47 AM

Fissile: Bumblefark: ciberido: rka: Bumblefark: As for not walking around 3rd world hell holes, screaming, ""Murica, fark yea!"...meh.

Good thing there is a whole host of options between cowering behind a Maple Leaf, claiming to be Canadian, and running around yelling "Murica, fark yea". It was just a movie with puppets, not a travel instruction guide.

I only ever had one "bad" experience come from identifying myself as being from the USA, and that was in Pusan, South Korea.  I was walking home one night from a movie theater (which was conveniently located inside a shopping mall).   I had stopped before crossing a street, and this European guy came up to me.  At least, based on his accent and appearance, I assume he was European.  We have a very short dialog:

European guy: America?
Me: I'm from North America, yes.
European guy : But American?  Not Canadian.
Me: I'm from the USA, yes.  Not Canadian.
European guy : Sorry, I don't talk to Americans. [Walks off]

I wouldn't even call it a "bad" experience, really, just weird, especially as I was minding my own business and he started the whole thing.

On a somewhat related note, I try to avoid calling the USA "America" or myself as "American" because there are a number of South Americans who take objection to that.  I got tired of hearing "We are Americans, too!" or "Uruguay is in America!" so I try to avoid the issue by saying "USA" when I'm abroad.

Most gratuitous misrepresentation of my nationality:

I convinced a smoking hot French girl who I met in Avignon that I was only educated in the US (thus the accent) in order to convince her to have lunch with me. Think I claimed Iceland. No recollection. All I remember if the smoking hot French girl.

/Sorry, fellow countrymen: I'll disown you in a heartbeat if our poor global image as a nation threatens to get between me and a smoking hot French girl. I just will.

===============

Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.


I was once entertained on a train headed for the former Leningrad, listening to a German wax indignant about how US war crimes in Iraq were reflective of American immorality.
 
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