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(BBC)   Dell posts 79% fall in profits. In other news Dell had profits   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 52
    More: Weird, Michael Dell, Carl Icahn, special committee  
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878 clicks; posted to Business » on 17 May 2013 at 2:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-17 03:03:54 PM  
Wow, no comments yet?

When they said take it more mobile, are they talking about during Dell into a smartphone company? That sounds like a really bad idea.
 
2013-05-17 03:12:44 PM  
"Dell has reported a 79% slide in net profit, underlining a fall in personal computers sales as more consumers shift to smartphones and tablets."

Consumers have austerity to spend.
 
2013-05-17 03:25:06 PM  
<dnrtfa>

you know.  i'm sure dell wants to proclaim as much falling profits as possible.  isn't there a plan for dell to go back to private?  wouldn't a decreased stock price make that a lot easier?

<rtfa>

oh, that was mentioned in the article.
 
2013-05-17 03:31:59 PM  
My girlfriend loves her XPS 15z. It's a pretty cool-looking Macbook clone, with much better specs, for about half the price of said Macbook.

That's just about the only personal experience I have with a Dell product.

/Lenovo user
 
2013-05-17 03:48:06 PM  
I like that Icahn guy.  Who else would propose replacing management with cats?
 
2013-05-17 03:49:25 PM  
"they have proposed to offer additional shares to shareholders and install mew management."

/in case the beeb fixes the typo
 
2013-05-17 03:54:23 PM  

RatOmeter: "they have proposed to offer additional shares to shareholders and install mew management."

/in case the beeb fixes the typo


static.comicvine.com
Approves.
 
2013-05-17 03:55:43 PM  
The problem for Dell and similar is that right now the technology for desktop and laptops has caught up with what the general public wants to do.  My almost 6 year old Dell laptop is still getting it done for me, though I'll probably upgrade when the Windows 8 service pack comes out.  Of course this is subject to change with future technology, though the internet infrastructure would need a major upgrade for the computers to be the lagging component.
 
2013-05-17 04:08:25 PM  
I still buy Dell.  No good reason not to with all the good deals on dealnews.  I can build one for cheaper usually, but when you factor in what it costs for my time, it's not worth it.

12349876:
Yup, that's something I've noticed.  My PC I built 3 years ago still plays all current games just fine on high or highish rez.  The only thing it needs is a new video card when something finally comes along I can't play.
 
2013-05-17 04:17:42 PM  
My opinion: Another problem for Dell is that they have to buy footprint at the data center. Their products are average with no innovation so they have a very low profit margin.
 
2013-05-17 04:18:24 PM  

12349876: My almost 6 year old Dell laptop is still getting it done for me, though I'll probably upgrade when the Windows 8 service pack comes out.


As long as you get a machine that isn't woefully underpowered at the time.  My in-laws bought my wife a dell laptop back in 2005.  We had just started dating, so I didn't get much input on the purchase.  Needless to say, it came standard with 256 megs of ram (only spec I can remember).  I swear, it takes about 5-6 minutes (or more) to boot up with XP.   It is seriously one of those mythical "I only need it for e-mail and the internet" machines that everyone claims to want.  If you want to do anything beyond that, good luck.

However, your overall point does stand.  My desktop (I think I bought it in '08) has aged much better and can still do pretty much what I want it to do.
 
2013-05-17 04:28:27 PM  

Freeballin: I still buy Dell.  No good reason not to with all the good deals on dealnews.  I can build one for cheaper usually, but when you factor in what it costs for my time, it's not worth it.


I honestly can't beat the deal prices for an office or typical home computer. It's tough to do if you're actually building from scratch (no using parts you have laying around, that's cheating) and you're paying for a Windows license. If you bother to factor in your time, it's not even close.

Gaming machines are a different story. Buying your gaming rig pre-built is inexcusable.
 
2013-05-17 04:50:24 PM  
Dell still makes some good desktops, but their laptops are garbage. Gotta love that crunchy plastic "I'm about to break" sound their laptops make when you pick them up.
 
2013-05-17 04:55:55 PM  
you should really look into the enterprise server space for some neat stuff.  regmedia.co.uk
 
2013-05-17 04:58:56 PM  
...as more consumers shift to smartphones and tablets.

Because no one owns both a smartphone or tablet and a PC.   Who writes this shiat?

Clearly the heavy hitters are driving profits down in an effort to reclaim the company - you don't need to be an Icahn to see that.
 
2013-05-17 05:03:27 PM  

ladodger34: My in-laws bought my wife a dell laptop back in 2005. We had just started dating, so I didn't get much input on the purchase. Needless to say, it came standard with 256 megs of ram (only spec I can remember).


Mine is 2 Gigs of RAM from summer 2007.  Definitely better than normal for the time, but not quite top end.
 
2013-05-17 05:29:32 PM  
I'm curious about that oversized tablet, XPS18 or whatever and I'll admit this is the photo that has me hooked:
images.tweaktown.com

I really can't justify buying one, I have no real purpose for it but I can see immense appeal if I had kids or was into table top gaming etc etc.
 
2013-05-17 06:01:55 PM  

Mcavity: you should really look into the enterprise server space for some neat stuff.  [regmedia.co.uk image 343x305]


One of my best decisions in recent years has been to ditch Dell blades entirely and go with this instead:
www.thinkahead.com
 
2013-05-17 06:37:52 PM  

BumpInTheNight: I'm curious about that oversized tablet, XPS18 or whatever and I'll admit this is the photo that has me hooked:
[images.tweaktown.com image 560x373]

I really can't justify buying one, I have no real purpose for it but I can see immense appeal if I had kids or was into table top gaming etc etc.


I want one of those things for field work.  No more walking around the outside of buildings taking measurements while trying to keep the 36X48 sheets from escaping in the wind.
 
2013-05-17 06:46:31 PM  

trippdogg: ...as more consumers shift to smartphones and tablets.

Because no one owns both a smartphone or tablet and a PC.   Who writes this shiat?

Clearly the heavy hitters are driving profits down in an effort to reclaim the company - you don't need to be an Icahn to see that.


Someone who's more in touch with the average consumer than you?

I have a work laptop (MacBook Pro), and my wife had a Dell Inspiron. When it crapped out (it didn't last long) we bought her a tablet, It does 98% of everything she wants. (Facebook, and uhh...) When she needs something stronger or something that a tablet can't do, I let her use my laptop.
 
2013-05-17 07:31:57 PM  
Time to buy?
 
2013-05-17 07:33:03 PM  

MrEricSir: Dell still makes some good desktops, but their laptops are garbage. Gotta love that crunchy plastic "I'm about to break" sound their laptops make when you pick them up.


I will be damned it sure does. I'm not going to be able to pick it up without thinking that anymore either! /has desktop and laptop

-------------------

A while back I ordered some klipsch headphones from Dell at full retail like a goon, then it was delayed a week, then a month. Canceled the order, they would have been here next week. I like my desktop, although I will probably snag a mac for my next laptop. Not that my iPad doesn't regularly crash come to think of it.
 
2013-05-17 07:33:30 PM  

valkore: Mcavity: you should really look into the enterprise server space for some neat stuff.  [regmedia.co.uk image 343x305]

One of my best decisions in recent years has been to ditch Dell blades entirely and go with this instead:
[www.thinkahead.com image 500x400]


What is that?
 
2013-05-17 07:53:40 PM  

un4gvn666: XPS


i have an xps702x, which I got on dell sale, with bluray writer drive, 3GB 555GT card, 16GM RAM, and (manually) upgraded the HD(1) to a 240 GB SSD.  The total cost was ~1250 with tax.  The 'best' macbook pro out there was ~3200 at the time, and didn't even match all the hardware.

Great product line
 
2013-05-17 08:29:22 PM  

anfrind: valkore: Mcavity: you should really look into the enterprise server space for some neat stuff.  [regmedia.co.uk image 343x305]

One of my best decisions in recent years has been to ditch Dell blades entirely and go with this instead:
[www.thinkahead.com image 500x400]

What is that?


Cisco UCS platform.  Built from the ground up for virtual server infrastructure, and without geeking out too much here, let me just say it kicks ass.
 
2013-05-17 09:12:49 PM  

Bullseyed: Wow, no comments yet?

When they said take it more mobile, are they talking about during Dell into a smartphone company? That sounds like a really bad idea.


Nah, they'll go all in with Windows RT tablets.
 
2013-05-17 10:16:17 PM  

valkore: Mcavity: you should really look into the enterprise server space for some neat stuff.  [regmedia.co.uk image 343x305]

One of my best decisions in recent years has been to ditch Dell blades entirely and go with this instead:
[www.thinkahead.com image 500x400]


well I wont argue against cisco when it come to the networking side of things .. and I have not used one of those systems so i cant say anything about it.

though the M1000e is a very flexible platform and it keeps improving.
 
2013-05-17 10:25:44 PM  

ladodger34: 12349876: My almost 6 year old Dell laptop is still getting it done for me, though I'll probably upgrade when the Windows 8 service pack comes out.

As long as you get a machine that isn't woefully underpowered at the time.  My in-laws bought my wife a dell laptop back in 2005.  We had just started dating, so I didn't get much input on the purchase.  Needless to say, it came standard with 256 megs of ram (only spec I can remember).  I swear, it takes about 5-6 minutes (or more) to boot up with XP.   It is seriously one of those mythical "I only need it for e-mail and the internet" machines that everyone claims to want.  If you want to do anything beyond that, good luck.

However, your overall point does stand.  My desktop (I think I bought it in '08) has aged much better and can still do pretty much what I want it to do.


This is so true.

If Dell wants to survive they need to get into the enterprise router and switch business. Also they need to start looking into other stuff like proxy solutions, load balancers, but just basically they really need to get into the enterprise network side of things.
 
2013-05-17 10:26:38 PM  
I was at a technical lecture where the speaker started by saying "I have a very heavy Indian accent, so if you're having a hard time understanding me, just think Dell customer support."
 
2013-05-17 10:28:27 PM  

MrEricSir: Dell still makes some good desktops, but their laptops are garbage. Gotta love that crunchy plastic "I'm about to break" sound their laptops make when you pick them up.


Not my XPS13... The only crunching sound it makes is the keyboard ever since my son spilled a glass of apple juice on it!
 
2013-05-17 10:39:27 PM  
valkore:
Cisco UCS platform.  Built from the ground up for virtual server infrastructure, and without geeking out too much here, let me just say it kicks ass.

In my experience most companies/admins who have bought blades seem to have these grandiose views of themselves. "Our stuff needs so much more processing power than a regular company!" or almost like Tim Tayloresque manner "MORE POWER!". But when you dig deep into it, using regular rack mount servers actually end up being more reliable, yet cheaper, choice.
 
2013-05-17 10:41:51 PM  

rnatalie: I was at a technical lecture where the speaker started by saying "I have a very heavy Indian accent, so if you're having a hard time understanding me, just think Dell customer support."


If you have a hard time understanding Indian accents, good luck with technical lectures.
 
2013-05-17 10:42:28 PM  
ongbok:

If Dell wants to survive they need to get into the enterprise router and switch business. Also they need to start looking into other stuff like proxy solutions, load balancers, but just basically they really need to get into the enterprise network side of things.

Like Force10?
 
2013-05-17 10:53:05 PM  

Mcavity: you should really look into the enterprise server space for some neat stuff.


When I worked in a large data center, I'd say the majority of our customer equipment was Dell branded.  Second most common was super micro.  Some HP and off brand stuff made up the rest.  HP seemed to be gaining a little popularity.

/my 2 cents.
 
2013-05-17 11:43:10 PM  

valkore: anfrind: valkore: Mcavity: you should really look into the enterprise server space for some neat stuff.  [regmedia.co.uk image 343x305]

One of my best decisions in recent years has been to ditch Dell blades entirely and go with this instead:
[www.thinkahead.com image 500x400]

What is that?

Cisco UCS platform.  Built from the ground up for virtual server infrastructure, and without geeking out too much here, let me just say it kicks ass.


Don't know you're requirements, but are you keeping an eye on HP's Moonshot?

I don't expect to use their stuff, but hope to push my employer to that direction in some products.
 
2013-05-17 11:51:24 PM  
I am hoping Dell can turn it around after he takes it private.  Going public was what ruined a decent companry.
 
2013-05-17 11:54:05 PM  

finnished: valkore:
Cisco UCS platform.  Built from the ground up for virtual server infrastructure, and without geeking out too much here, let me just say it kicks ass.

In my experience most companies/admins who have bought blades seem to have these grandiose views of themselves. "Our stuff needs so much more processing power than a regular company!" or almost like Tim Tayloresque manner "MORE POWER!". But when you dig deep into it, using regular rack mount servers actually end up being more reliable, yet cheaper, choice.


Most of the big server hardware companies make the exact same hardware in rack or blade form factors, so pretty much the same power is available regardless of how you want to stack your iron.  UCS servers also come in standard rack form factors.  The reason why UCS was primarily chosen was due to how it makes managing a stack of standalone servers for a virtual environment that much easier and consistent.  When you put all your eggs in one basket, it should be one helluva basket.
 
2013-05-17 11:58:00 PM  

RatOmeter: Don't know you're requirements, but are you keeping an eye on HP's Moonshot?

I don't expect to use their stuff, but hope to push my employer to that direction in some products.


That does look pretty damn cool, but sounds like it's purpose built for hosting web applications.  Wonder if that's where they're starting, and then will branch out from there.
 
2013-05-18 12:11:36 AM  

valkore: RatOmeter: Don't know you're requirements, but are you keeping an eye on HP's Moonshot?

I don't expect to use their stuff, but hope to push my employer to that direction in some products.

That does look pretty damn cool, but sounds like it's purpose built for hosting web applications.  Wonder if that's where they're starting, and then will branch out from there.


For HP, I think it's a bold step in a right direction like they haven't made in at least a couple of decades.  Yes, the idea is moving data (web applications) at lower overall cost.  But I think the convergence of multi-processing (both hw & sw), performance architectures and advanced control over hardware "power domains", mostly driven by the mobile device market, can make great things happen in the server space.
 Not especially great for scientific (extreme number crunching), simulation or gaming applications, but I do think we're looking at a market changing shift in tech.
 
2013-05-18 07:09:21 AM  
The consumer market doesn't realize that Dell's enterprise equipment is competitive, and the provide solid enterprise support. Some of their products are downright bargains in their class.
 
2013-05-18 10:05:35 AM  

valkore: Most of the big server hardware companies make the exact same hardware in rack or blade form factors, so pretty much the same power is available regardless of how you want to stack your iron.  UCS servers also come in standard rack form factors.  The reason why UCS was primarily chosen was due to how it makes managing a stack of standalone servers for a virtual environment that much easier and consistent.  When you put all your eggs in one basket, it should be one helluva basket.


The vendors love it of course, because when you buy the blade chassis, you're stuck with them for the blades. And yeah, that's the other point; you are making a big single point of failure basket with the blade chassis.
 
2013-05-18 10:48:42 AM  
Retarded people: "THIS IS THE DEATH OF THE PC!!! ZOMG!!!!!!"
 
2013-05-18 12:06:02 PM  

finnished: ongbok:

If Dell wants to survive they need to get into the enterprise router and switch business. Also they need to start looking into other stuff like proxy solutions, load balancers, but just basically they really need to get into the enterprise network side of things.

Like Force10?


Dell has done a pretty bad job marketing all of the enterprise acquisitions they've done in the last 5 years.  People think of dell and they still think of that stoner commercial "dude, you're getting a dell" laptop company.

No one thinks of Dell as a cloud computing, networking, security, storage, management, etc...solution, which they are.

People just identify with the brand as a laptop company.
 
2013-05-18 01:05:28 PM  
Bullseyed:
When they said take it more mobile, are they talking about during Dell into a smartphone company? That sounds like a really bad idea.

That depends on how they do it.  Microsoft is offering to finance part of that buyout, probably so that they can get them to put Windows on any phones or tablets that Dell puts out.  Let's ask Nokia how well that Windows-only option is working out.

20 years ago, if you weren't Apple and you wanted to make a PC, you went with MS-DOS and Windows, because there was already an existing application ecosystem out there that you could leverage.

Today, if you're not Apple and you want to make a smartphone, you go with Android because there's already an existing application ecosystem out there that you can leverage.

What you don't want to do is put out something that runs a proprietary system with a 2% market share.

If you're really smart, you do the same thing that Google is doing with the Nexus.  Standard Android, unlocked, minimal customization, and the usual hardware bells and whistles.
 
2013-05-18 01:26:29 PM  
boozehat:
Dell has done a pretty bad job marketing all of the enterprise acquisitions they've done in the last 5 years.  People think of dell and they still think of that stoner commercial "dude, you're getting a dell" laptop company.

No one thinks of Dell as a cloud computing, networking, security, storage, management, etc...solution, which they are.

People just identify with the brand as a laptop company.


I agree. Especially when it comes to the public at large. Of course, the public at large doesn't necessarily want to know about this either.

As a dell business customer, I get invitations almost on weekly basis to Dell events where they do talk about these things. But even I was surprised when they told me they could help with warehouse management infrastructure AND Sharepoint.
 
2013-05-18 02:31:07 PM  

finnished: you are making a big single point of failure basket with the blade chassis.


I could be mistaken, but every blade server I've seen has redundant, modular components.  System fans, power supplies, everything has at least one redundant component and they can all be quickly and easily swapped out.
 
2013-05-18 02:37:07 PM  

Honest Bender: finnished: you are making a big single point of failure basket with the blade chassis.

I could be mistaken, but every blade server I've seen has redundant, modular components.  System fans, power supplies, everything has at least one redundant component and they can all be quickly and easily swapped out.


You're right, they have a lot of redundancy built in to them. But just like a SAN array, even though you have redundant hard drives, redundant network adapters, redundant power supplies, it's still just one box, and all the blades inside still share some components.
 
2013-05-18 03:09:55 PM  

finnished: Honest Bender: finnished: you are making a big single point of failure basket with the blade chassis.

I could be mistaken, but every blade server I've seen has redundant, modular components.  System fans, power supplies, everything has at least one redundant component and they can all be quickly and easily swapped out.

You're right, they have a lot of redundancy built in to them. But just like a SAN array, even though you have redundant hard drives, redundant network adapters, redundant power supplies, it's still just one box, and all the blades inside still share some components.


So buy two of them.
 
2013-05-18 07:15:34 PM  
This must be the thread where all the Dell owners offer their irrelevant anecdotes about their shiatty plastic laptop they bought 6 years ago.
 
2013-05-18 07:21:12 PM  

theurge14: This must be the thread where all the Dell owners offer their irrelevant anecdotes about their shiatty plastic laptop they bought 6 years ago.


And the irrelevant comment from the gaming hipster who doesn't know that a 6 year old medium-high end laptop can still do the shiat that most people want to do with their computer.
 
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