If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Post)   Guess who made the list of least racist countries? USA USA USA USA   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 219
    More: Interesting, United States, Asian countries, economic freedom, Statistical survey, World Values Survey, Southeast Asian  
•       •       •

11788 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 May 2013 at 2:53 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



219 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-17 12:03:58 AM
Well, to be fair, we don't technically count the south as part of the USA...
 
2013-05-17 12:19:49 AM
What's worse: Racism or classism?
 
2013-05-17 12:23:39 AM
I still think we're the greatest country in the world.

And that we need to do much, MUCH better.
 
2013-05-17 12:31:03 AM
Surprised Korea isn't a darker shade of red, and SHOCKED that Japan is blue.  I've heard that there are tens of thousands of people of Korean descent, who have lived (or their parents have lived) in Japan since the end of WWII and still don't have citizenship, and simliar for a lot of Brazilians whose families came over decades ago as cheap labor.
 
2013-05-17 12:46:26 AM
Asking about neighbors is an interesting way to tease out this information. A potential neighbor would probably be in the same socio-economic sphere as you which means they would have similar values and habits to a large extent.

Not at all surprised about France.

Or South Africa.

A little surprised that England is more tolerant than Ireland.

Very surprised at the tolerance in Latin America. This may change my future vacation plans.
 
2013-05-17 12:50:06 AM

NewportBarGuy: What's worse: Racism or classism?


racism
 
2013-05-17 12:51:39 AM
Oh great, this thread shall be fun
 
2013-05-17 12:54:34 AM

R.A.Danny: I still think we're the greatest country in the world.

And that we need to do much, MUCH better.


What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.
 
2013-05-17 12:55:36 AM
Screw adults, they are already set in their ways. The effort involved for the results we can anticipate just don't justify the potential costs.
 
2013-05-17 12:57:43 AM

ShawnDoc: I've heard that there are tens of thousands of people of Korean descent, who have lived (or their parents have lived) in Japan since the end of WWII and still don't have citizenship,


They asked about who you'd like as a neighbor and this particular map shows those that said "people of another race" as those that they would not want as neighbors.   I assume Japanese don't consider Koreans as coming from another race.   There's probably some linguistic wiggle room there (as "race" as the west defines it is rather nebulous worldwide) so the whole study is should be taken with a grain of salt.
 
2013-05-17 01:00:45 AM
Find 90 spots around the world 30 affluent, 30 average, 30 very very poor. Make part of school costs a thousand dollars set aside per kid, over the lifetime of their primary and secondary education; that's a little over $75/year. With the volume of kids we are sending we can totally get some discounted travel. The kids spend 4 days in one of the three zones. They visit all 3 on one trip. They return to school (or starting a job). think of the benefits!
 
2013-05-17 01:00:51 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: R.A.Danny: I still think we're the greatest country in the world.

And that we need to do much, MUCH better.

What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.


Hell just have them do that in America. I think a lot of people would learn more about people, cultures and attitudes by simply visiting other areas. Also have everyone do a customer service job for two years. You will quickly learn to hate pretty much everyone equally. You will also learn to really appreciate the nice ones even more. I know I did.
 
2013-05-17 01:00:58 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.


You know, there are some really poor, f*cked up people here too, right? They can see that right at home.
 
2013-05-17 01:02:07 AM

dameron: ShawnDoc: I've heard that there are tens of thousands of people of Korean descent, who have lived (or their parents have lived) in Japan since the end of WWII and still don't have citizenship,

They asked about who you'd like as a neighbor and this particular map shows those that said "people of another race" as those that they would not want as neighbors.   I assume Japanese don't consider Koreans as coming from another race.   There's probably some linguistic wiggle room there (as "race" as the west defines it is rather nebulous worldwide) so the whole study is should be taken with a grain of salt.


I would assume they adjusted for local or language-wide or nation-wide idioms or equivalencies.
 
2013-05-17 01:06:01 AM

NewportBarGuy: Uchiha_Cycliste: What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.

You know, there are some really poor, f*cked up people here too, right? They can see that right at home.


Yeah. You really don't need to leave this county to see some pretty farked up shiat.
 
2013-05-17 01:07:34 AM

NewportBarGuy: Uchiha_Cycliste: What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.

You know, there are some really poor, f*cked up people here too, right? They can see that right at home.


There are, but I think the travel is good. In addition while we have crushing poverty, I think the radical differences in the way a community copes with that poverty would be much different in Rural China or Calcutta or Some where shiatty in Africa. The utter foreignness of the area would go that much further to foster a sense of gratitude for what we have.  While the same potential poorness can be found here I think our communities will still seem familiar in a way The community would still feel pretty American even while demonstrating an appreciable deviation from the normal per capita wealth in the US.
 
2013-05-17 01:09:22 AM
An shiat, for some of these kids this is the farthest they will ever travel. The wildest trip they will ever take. As long as this is being discussed might as well mention another potential upside.
 
2013-05-17 02:29:28 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: R.A.Danny: I still think we're the greatest country in the world.

And that we need to do much, MUCH better.

What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.


That could cool but it cost money so...?
I guess the peace corp is still active yet not promoted. And well you could be like Romney and be a Mormon missionary.
 
2013-05-17 02:31:45 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Uchiha_Cycliste: R.A.Danny: I still think we're the greatest country in the world.

And that we need to do much, MUCH better.

What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.

That could cool but it cost money so...?
I guess the peace corp is still active yet not promoted. And well you could be like Romney and be a Mormon missionary.


I did a price breakdown in another post. It actually not unreasonable I think.
 
2013-05-17 02:33:48 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: Find 90 spots around the world 30 affluent, 30 average, 30 very very poor. Make part of school costs a thousand dollars set aside per kid, over the lifetime of their primary and secondary education; that's a little over $75/year. With the volume of kids we are sending we can totally get some discounted travel. The kids spend 4 days in one of the three zones. They visit all 3 on one trip. They return to school (or starting a job). think of the benefits!


It's nice in theory but look at what US citizens normally have in savings, it's the rich kids that get the overseas trips.
 
2013-05-17 02:36:17 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: tinfoil-hat maggie: Uchiha_Cycliste: R.A.Danny: I still think we're the greatest country in the world.

And that we need to do much, MUCH better.

What we really need is a program that gets late HS/early college kids to globe-trot through both affluent and poverty stricken corners of the globe so that they can appreciate (and stop taking for granted) what they really have here at home.

That could cool but it cost money so...?
I guess the peace corp is still active yet not promoted. And well you could be like Romney and be a Mormon missionary.

I did a price breakdown in another post. It actually not unreasonable I think.


Saw that an answered. I mean my state has a tax free weekend before school starts to help parents be able afford new notebooks and clothes.
 
2013-05-17 02:56:28 AM
Pressure Cooker ala Thelma Houston:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44TpD-VOqFI">https://www.yout ube.com/watch?v=44TpD-VOqFI   Great Song.  Ease off bro
 
2013-05-17 02:59:01 AM
Interesting the contrast between Pakistan and its neighbor India.


Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Well, to be fair, we don't technically count the south as part of the USA...


Too bad they didn't break down the US by state.
 
2013-05-17 03:07:14 AM

ShawnDoc: Surprised Korea isn't a darker shade of red, and SHOCKED that Japan is blue.  I've heard that there are tens of thousands of people of Korean descent, who have lived (or their parents have lived) in Japan since the end of WWII and still don't have citizenship, and simliar for a lot of Brazilians whose families came over decades ago as cheap labor.


At least for the people of Korean descent, today the only thing in the way of them taking citizenship is the desire to maintain their own culture. Japan doesn't allow dual citizenship, so they'd have to give up their own citizenship in North or South Korea to take it.

Dunno about why the Japanese-Brazilians wouldn't want to take it, but there's nothing stopping them.
 
2013-05-17 03:07:52 AM
Er...nothing in law stopping them.
 
2013-05-17 03:07:56 AM

ShawnDoc: Surprised Korea isn't a darker shade of red, and SHOCKED that Japan is blue.  I've heard that there are tens of thousands of people of Korean descent, who have lived (or their parents have lived) in Japan since the end of WWII and still don't have citizenship, and simliar for a lot of Brazilians whose families came over decades ago as cheap labor.


Japan is perhaps the worst I have had contact with. I think too it would be very much within the cultural mores to lie about it.
 
2013-05-17 03:08:46 AM
What surprised me the most on my first trip to Europe was the outright racist comments that were made with absolutely no shame.  The comments towards the Roma* were the worse.

*aka gypsies
 
2013-05-17 03:10:58 AM

NewportBarGuy: What's worse: Racism or classism?


Whichever one you have a better chance of accusing the USA of being.

/don't worry, this survey will disappear down the memory hole soon enough
//then the USA can be both the most racist and most classist nation again, along with whatever other -ists you want to use
 
2013-05-17 03:10:59 AM

dameron: ShawnDoc: I've heard that there are tens of thousands of people of Korean descent, who have lived (or their parents have lived) in Japan since the end of WWII and still don't have citizenship,

They asked about who you'd like as a neighbor and this particular map shows those that said "people of another race" as those that they would not want as neighbors.   I assume Japanese don't consider Koreans as coming from another race.   There's probably some linguistic wiggle room there (as "race" as the west defines it is rather nebulous worldwide) so the whole study is should be taken with a grain of salt.


There also may be those who would tolerate some "other races" as neighbors but not others -- a white person who would accept a Japanese neighbor but not a black one could honestly answer yes to the survey.
 
2013-05-17 03:11:16 AM
Japan's cloaking their shiat hard.
 
2013-05-17 03:12:00 AM
What cracks me up is white people from the US Mainland who travel to Hawaii and get treated like they are less than the top of the social heap who come back home and complain about how racist Hawaiians are.  Same thing happens when they travel to Japan and Korea.

You'd think they'd take it as a wake up call about how they treat everyone else, but rather they call racism.

It's not racism, it's just what it's like to not be dominant in the social hierarchy. Welcome to what it's like for everyone else in America.
 
2013-05-17 03:13:59 AM
Russia's only at 15-20%? I find that hard to believe. I wonder if any of the respondents there said they wouldn't live next door to "Caucasians"?
 
2013-05-17 03:14:31 AM
ginandbacon:

A little surprised that England is more tolerant than Ireland.

Very surprised at the tolerance in Latin America. This may change my future vacation plans.


I don't think Ireland was polled, it's grey like most of Africa, not light blue like Eastern Europe.  South America doesn't surprise me at all, Brazil has a lot of problems with inequality and discrimination, but it seems to have more to do with someone's wealth (or lack thereof) than their race.
 
2013-05-17 03:14:53 AM
It's Swedish researchers (those are the people who think that 'rape' is when, as a man, you don't close your legs on the bus) going through a list of 'values'. So pardon me if I had questions before I read this ('how on *earth* are you going to measure something so un-scientific), but now I'm completely convinced of the bogus-ness of this 'research'.
 
2013-05-17 03:15:55 AM
FTA: "The Middle East not so tolerant."

media.tumblr.com
 
2013-05-17 03:16:06 AM
You have to look at America's racism from the proper perspective.

Yes, we are atrociously racist. Yes, people are outspokenly hateful about their dislike for those of different skin hues. Yes, there are stories about how blacks/browns/reds/yellows get mistreated by whites in our media daily. And often it seems like other nations don't have nearly the reports of blatant racism that seem to plague America.

But you have to ask: Is that because we are so much more racist than other places--or is it because we are willing to admit it, and that minorities have enough of a voice and enough power in our nation to be able to make their stories of maltreatment public knowledge? After all, if (as in the antebellum South) nobody bothered to report stories of whites beating up on blacks, it could well seem that the American South was a paradise of racial tolerance, based on the reporting. There weren't any reports of violence, right, and if you asked any of the slaves, I'm sure they would have said things were just peachy!

So when reports are asked in this way "Who would you choose as a neighbor?" things become a bit clearer: most people in America are certainly less racist than, say, most of Asia. Yet racial violence seems to be lower, because of how things get reported.

Just a thought.
 
2013-05-17 03:17:44 AM

bakarocket: Dunno about why the Japanese-Brazilians wouldn't want to take it, but there's nothing stopping them.


Can we call them Brazapanese?
 
2013-05-17 03:18:58 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: Uchiha_Cycliste: Find 90 spots around the world 30 affluent, 30 average, 30 very very poor. Make part of school costs a thousand dollars set aside per kid, over the lifetime of their primary and secondary education; that's a little over $75/year. With the volume of kids we are sending we can totally get some discounted travel. The kids spend 4 days in one of the three zones. They visit all 3 on one trip. They return to school (or starting a job). think of the benefits!

It's nice in theory but look at what US citizens normally have in savings, it's the rich kids that get the overseas trips.


Since I'm dreaming, I want the federal government to pay for it. 1/12 of 1/8th of the population travel every year. A trust is set up for every student in Kindergarten and has money added every year. Every year this fund increments for 1/8th of the population. About 1/8th is too old to be working  and about .2 quarter too young. So some 5/8ths of 350 million  so some 220 million contribute each year need to contribute 3.6 Billion every year. If every one paid equally they would pay $16 every year. If we prevent the bottom half from paying everyone else pays $32 per year (added to taxes). All kids get to take the trip. They become eligible their final semester of HS (assuming they are on track to graduate. If they aren't or they drop out they are eligible between 19 and  20. I will not make the trip contingent on HS graduation, only incentivize graduation by making the trip sooner (and assuming they can legally travel).
 
2013-05-17 03:19:30 AM

NewportBarGuy: What's worse: Racism or classism?


-Ism's in my opinion are not good. A person should not believe in an -ism, he should believe in himself. I quote John Lennon, "I don't believe in Beatles, I just believe in me." Good point there. After all, he was the walrus.
 
2013-05-17 03:20:05 AM

dameron: They asked about who you'd like as a neighbor and this particular map shows those that said "people of another race" as those that they would not want as neighbors. I assume Japanese don't consider Koreans as coming from another race. There's probably some linguistic wiggle room there (as "race" as the west defines it is rather nebulous worldwide) so the whole study is should be taken with a grain of salt.


I would imagine the opposite. I'm no expert, but I think they'd be somewhat pissed, if you mixed them up.
The real question is, "would you be angry, if your child married one of "them?"
 
2013-05-17 03:24:58 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: What cracks me up is white people from the US Mainland who travel to Hawaii and get treated like they are less than the top of the social heap who come back home and complain about how racist Hawaiians are.  Same thing happens when they travel to Japan and Korea.

You'd think they'd take it as a wake up call about how they treat everyone else, but rather they call racism.

It's not racism, it's just what it's like to not be dominant in the social hierarchy. Welcome to what it's like for everyone else in America.



I remember a few times on Fark where some white American dude - and he might appear here again - said that the Chinese are racist because he had a Chinese girlfriend and every time they stepped out in China, all the Chinese would stare at him. Apparently, this was 'racist' and it would not happen in the US.

Brilliant logic, Sherlock Whiteboi.
 
2013-05-17 03:26:02 AM
Given that the Anglo countries score well, I wonder if that's a reflection of their cultural hegemony. Look at the strength of popular culture coming out of the 5 Anglo nations. There's no Acadamie Anglais ensuring the purity of the English language. Perhaps people in these countries are so secure in their culture that they don't see other cultures as a threat as often as people in other countries may.
 
2013-05-17 03:27:13 AM

Gyrfalcon: So when reports are asked in this way "Who would you choose as a neighbor?" things become a bit clearer: most people in America are certainly less racist than, say, most of Asia. Yet racial violence seems to be lower, because of how things get reported.



Or because of far less opportunity.  Japan is 98% Japanese, Korea is 97% Korean.  China is 92% Han.   America is 72.4% white.  It's hard to have racial violence when nearly everyone is the same race.
 
2013-05-17 03:29:08 AM

GungFu: AverageAmericanGuy: What cracks me up is white people from the US Mainland who travel to Hawaii and get treated like they are less than the top of the social heap who come back home and complain about how racist Hawaiians are.  Same thing happens when they travel to Japan and Korea.

You'd think they'd take it as a wake up call about how they treat everyone else, but rather they call racism.

It's not racism, it's just what it's like to not be dominant in the social hierarchy. Welcome to what it's like for everyone else in America.

I remember a few times on Fark where some white American dude - and he might appear here again - said that the Chinese are racist because he had a Chinese girlfriend and every time they stepped out in China, all the Chinese would stare at him. Apparently, this was 'racist' and it would not happen in the US.

Brilliant logic, Sherlock Whiteboi.



I've been in rural China and been gawked at simply for looking unusual (while traveling with Mrs. jshine, who is Chinese).  People have never been discourteous or impolite, just (apparently) curious.
 
2013-05-17 03:29:33 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: tinfoil-hat maggie: Uchiha_Cycliste: Find 90 spots around the world 30 affluent, 30 average, 30 very very poor. Make part of school costs a thousand dollars set aside per kid, over the lifetime of their primary and secondary education; that's a little over $75/year. With the volume of kids we are sending we can totally get some discounted travel. The kids spend 4 days in one of the three zones. They visit all 3 on one trip. They return to school (or starting a job). think of the benefits!

It's nice in theory but look at what US citizens normally have in savings, it's the rich kids that get the overseas trips.

Since I'm dreaming, I want the federal government to pay for it. 1/12 of 1/8th of the population travel every year. A trust is set up for every student in Kindergarten and has money added every year. Every year this fund increments for 1/8th of the population. About 1/8th is too old to be working  and about .2 quarter too young. So some 5/8ths of 350 million  so some 220 million contribute each year need to contribute 3.6 Billion every year. If every one paid equally they would pay $16 every year. If we prevent the bottom half from paying everyone else pays $32 per year (added to taxes). All kids get to take the trip. They become eligible their final semester of HS (assuming they are on track to graduate. If they aren't or they drop out they are eligible between 19 and  20. I will not make the trip contingent on HS graduation, only incentivize graduation by making the trip sooner (and assuming they can legally travel).


Well don't get me wrong I like the idea and I think it could help give perspective. Although I've rarely been out of the US it's just I read a lot of well everything, so even if I haven't seen some things first hand I learned about them through reading which is pretty cheap overall.
 
2013-05-17 03:29:34 AM
Do our sports fans/ personalities make monkey chants, throw bananas or give nazi salutes?

No. So we're better than all of Europe for starters
 
2013-05-17 03:29:36 AM

OgreMagi: What surprised me the most on my first trip to Europe was the outright racist comments that were made with absolutely no shame.  The comments towards the Roma* were the worse.

*aka gypsies


Yep. Say what you will about white America's attitudes toward the darkies. Doesn't hold a candle to the European hatred of Gypsies. Shameless is really the only word for it.
 
2013-05-17 03:31:33 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: It's not racism, it's just what it's like to not be dominant in the social hierarchy. Welcome to what it's like for everyone else in America.


So, minorities in America don't experience racism, just "not being dominant in the social hierarchy"?

That's spiffy, I guess.
 
2013-05-17 03:33:55 AM
What comes to mind to me is the fact that it's publically unacceptable to be known as a racist here in the states. So I think if you ask a racist person a question for a survey they will give an answer that hides their racism most of the time. They keep that stuff to themselves unless they think they are among fellow racists OR they think they can act on their racism without consequence.
 
2013-05-17 03:34:04 AM
Japan is infamous for being one of the most racist countries in history, and that reputation has not diminished in recent years.  As for Pakistan, how many Latinos, Chinese, Irish people, etc. live there?  They have no frame of reference to say what their preference is regarding the race of their neighbors.

A better question is, "Would someone living in [country that borders on your country] throw a biatchfit if you moved in next door to them?"  Followed by, "Within your own country, would a person of X race throw a biatchfit if you moved in next door to them?"
 
Displayed 50 of 219 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report