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(InfoWorld)   She's gonna blow: 10 Star Trek technologies that are almost here   (infoworld.com) divider line 103
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10503 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 May 2013 at 1:39 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-17 12:20:50 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Energy sources. Wiki something called the Casimir Effect.

Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?

Didn't read TFA, did you?

I'm not talking sci-fi here, just basic run-of-the-mill high school physics concepts.

Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?


>>>>>I'm not talking sci-fi here, just basic run-of-the-mill high school physics concepts.

 

Well, first, the Casimir Effect is definitely not science fiction. Repeated experiments have shown that there is some kind of energy there. Either an electromagnetic field (somehow created without power input), or "vacuum energy" from the creation of virtual particle pairs. My bet is that this effect will have important applications someday.

>>>>>Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?

Probably not. Conventional thought would say no. Interesting article from MIT about it that states that magnets do not contain energy. BUT.....

What is a magnetic field, anyway? Expanding, what is any field. What are fields "made" of? All the answers I've seen are simply circular complex variations of "a field is a field is a field." I've read articles by physicists that claim that fields are created by elemental particles, and others that those particles are created by fields.

Do magnets ever wear out? The articles I looked at say "yes, eventually" but that this has little to do with usage and more to do with random radiation, environmental heat, and physical vibration. A normal refrigerator magnet will eventually fall to the floor, but not in your lifetime.

Attempts to use magnets as engines seem to me to be perpetual motion machines doomed to failure.
So I would say that - unless we can discover a material that is 100% to magnetic fields - then no, not an energy source.
 
2013-05-17 02:58:07 PM

Felgraf: B) It requires the mass-energy of the voyager probe. (This is an improvement: The initial one required the mass-energy *of Jupiter*)


That actually isn't nearly as bad as it sounds.  Voyager weighed in at 1,600 pounds.  Just means you need 550 pounds of antimatter and 550 pounds of normal matter to warp space enough to be viable.

That is not an unimaginable amount of anti-matter.
 
2013-05-17 03:53:55 PM

Edymnion: Just means you need 550 pounds of antimatter and 550 pounds of normal matter to warp space enough to be viable.


incorrect. Even in star trek  matter to energy conversion is not perfect.
 
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