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(InfoWorld)   She's gonna blow: 10 Star Trek technologies that are almost here   (infoworld.com) divider line 103
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10503 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 May 2013 at 1:39 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-16 03:47:35 PM

ShawnDoc: WhoGAS: I didn't take it that way myself. I assumed "almost here" on a more geological time scale where 150 years is pretty much no time at all.

What do you do for a living, that when someone says something is "almost here", you think of a amount of time greater than your lifespan?


Your mom's orgasm?
 
2013-05-16 03:49:31 PM

Felgraf: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: PsyLord: When I saw that #1 was the Warp Drive, I stopped.  Seriously, almost there with the Warp Drive?  The article writer is a double dumb-@ss.

Could happen 500 years from now after lots of painstaking incremental research. Could happen tomorrow in some RA's lab. A warp drive is the kind of thing that can be discovered by sheer dumb luck.

Well, there is a *theoretical* warp drive that the math works out for. The problems are

A) It requires an exotic form of matter that we're *NOT SURE EXISTS YET*.

B) It requires the mass-energy of the voyager probe. (This is an improvement: The initial one required the mass-energy *of Jupiter*)

C) It kind of kills everything in front of it when you stop it (massive gamma ray burst). So you'd have to (if you could ever actually build and fuel one) sort of.. point it *parallel* to your intended destination, stop a ways out, then putter in at sublight speeds.


I wonder about the gamma ray bursts. Should we be looking for these things somehow?  Maybe other intelligent civilizations have invented this form of warp drive?
 
2013-05-16 03:57:30 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Having your atoms scrambled in one location and reassembled elsewhere

would be nice, but that's not how transporters work.


Yeah, that's how WonkaVision works.
 
2013-05-16 03:57:39 PM

ShawnDoc: WhoGAS: I didn't take it that way myself. I assumed "almost here" on a more geological time scale where 150 years is pretty much no time at all.

What do you do for a living, that when someone says something is "almost here", you think of a amount of time greater than your lifespan?


I don't really see how that has anything to do with anything, where I work I mean.  Nor would the relative definition of "almost there" apply the same way it does with technological advances.

The article was about advances in science. As a person who reads a little bit, I know that throughout the history of science, we did not suddenly go "Look, a WHEEL!" and the next day the guy creates a Ferrari.  These things always take time.

I apply the phrase as it's appropriate based on the subject not relative to me.

Now if they had said, "Will be here in 32 years, 5 hours", then, when that time came to pass and they didn't deliver, yes, that would have been stupid of them to have done that.
 
2013-05-16 03:59:38 PM

metallion: Tommy Moo: No way is teleporting more than a quantum particle "almost here." And even if it was, I'd never do it. No one stops to think that the people in Star Trek die every time they use a teleporter, and are replaced with an exact copy of themselves at the other end.

There was a story in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in either '79 or early '80, about teleport technology.  Can't remember the name.

It opens with the inventer of the technology watching people getting in and out of the transports.  She meets a young boy who has teleported everywhere, and she has a couple of flashbacks.

One is creating the technology, and two, is how to solve the fact that it's not truly teleport tech as much as it is copy tech.  When you teleport, your dna/body stats are read, and then you are electrocuted with enough voltage to turn you to ash, and the data is transmitted to the destination, where you are rebuilt.

She is afraid that if she teleports, she'll lose her soul.

It ends up with the kid picking her up, and tossing her into the teleporter, and when she rematerilizes, she realizes that it isn't that bad.

It's been a long time since I read that, but it was a fun read.


Good think she slept through it, because it's longer than you think inside the teleport chamber.
 
2013-05-16 04:10:46 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Having your atoms scrambled in one location and reassembled elsewhere

would be nice, but that's not how transporters work.


Transporters are a bad idea anyway, since the person who steps into one is killed.
 
2013-05-16 04:19:45 PM

bsharitt: Is Fark getting paid to post a bunch of Star Trek links?


I suspect it's subtle or not so subtle advertising
 
2013-05-16 04:33:37 PM

metallion: Tommy Moo: No way is teleporting more than a quantum particle "almost here." And even if it was, I'd never do it. No one stops to think that the people in Star Trek die every time they use a teleporter, and are replaced with an exact copy of themselves at the other end.

There was a story in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in either '79 or early '80, about teleport technology.  Can't remember the name.

It opens with the inventer of the technology watching people getting in and out of the transports.  She meets a young boy who has teleported everywhere, and she has a couple of flashbacks.

One is creating the technology, and two, is how to solve the fact that it's not truly teleport tech as much as it is copy tech.  When you teleport, your dna/body stats are read, and then you are electrocuted with enough voltage to turn you to ash, and the data is transmitted to the destination, where you are rebuilt.

She is afraid that if she teleports, she'll lose her soul.

It ends up with the kid picking her up, and tossing her into the teleporter, and when she rematerilizes, she realizes that it isn't that bad.

It's been a long time since I read that, but it was a fun read.


The thing is, that if it copies you, then that copy just thinks everything is fine because it remembers being you. The original you, however, probably experiences your life ending as soon as the teleport happens. There's just no way to tell what happens to that sense of self.
 
2013-05-16 04:35:30 PM
I'm not boinking a hologram right now so shut up.
 
2013-05-16 04:40:02 PM

Tommy Moo: No way is teleporting more than a quantum particle "almost here."


Exactly. I friend of mine and I used to do a calculation, every so often. It's a reasonable assumption that, to teleport a human (in the way described by Star Trek), you'd need a computer to control the process. Being (very) generous, we'd assume one computer cycle to teleport each elementary particle in a human body. The last time I did the math (in about 2005), there hadn't been enough computer cycles in all of computing history to teleport a single person.

No, I'm thinking teleportation will be more like Stargate, if we can ever figure out how to create and control wormholes.
 
2013-05-16 04:50:07 PM
Yeah list kinda sucked. One thing we do sorta have is force fields. They're used as a vacuum-atmosphere barrier for ebeam welding. See plasma window.
 
2013-05-16 05:16:46 PM

IC Stars: ArcadianRefugee: Having your atoms scrambled in one location and reassembled elsewhere

would be nice, but that's not how transporters work.

Transporters are a bad idea anyway, since the person who steps into one is killed.


Kinda my point. Anyone who realizes this would probably never use one, especially if they believe in the concept of souls.
 
2013-05-16 05:47:00 PM
I hope there are a lot of lightsaber battles in the new one.
 
2013-05-16 05:54:23 PM

Dadoo: we'd assume one computer cycle to teleport each elementary particle in a human body


Not an expert on trekology, but aren't reproducing the particles/atoms/molecules the easiest part? Every molecule of H20 or whatever is the same as any other molecule of H20. You don't need to transport the physical stuff - just swap in the same chemical objects... Ans it'd seem you'd only need to get the position of every particle/atom/molecule correct to something like a tenth or a hundredth of an Angstrom (?)

What's always puzzled me about transporter tech is how to reproduce all the currents on the other side. I.e. the electrical impulses driving your heart, working in your brain to keep memories active, etc...
 
2013-05-16 05:59:37 PM

wjllope: Dadoo: we'd assume one computer cycle to teleport each elementary particle in a human body

Not an expert on trekology, but aren't reproducing the particles/atoms/molecules the easiest part? Every molecule of H20 or whatever is the same as any other molecule of H20. You don't need to transport the physical stuff - just swap in the same chemical objects... Ans it'd seem you'd only need to get the position of every particle/atom/molecule correct to something like a tenth or a hundredth of an Angstrom (?)

What's always puzzled me about transporter tech is how to reproduce all the currents on the other side. I.e. the electrical impulses driving your heart, working in your brain to keep memories active, etc...



Feh, for me, I want to know how at many different times across the years they have shown characters interacting and talking *during* transport.  With audible undistorted voices, etc...
 
2013-05-16 06:15:19 PM

BafflerMeal: Feh, for me, I want to know how at many different times across the years they have shown characters interacting and talking *during* transport.  With audible undistorted voices, etc...


I guess I don't watch enough trek - I've never seen that. But couldn't that simply be "emulated communication" between the digitized versions of the transportees that is occurring in the transporter hardware itself during the transportation process?
If I can buy the fact that this process is occurring in the first place, I can certainly buy that possibility.

I also completely buy the fact that every atom/molecule in a body can be identified (spectroscopically
or whatever) and digitized in location to whatever precision is necessary.
But my point earlier was that this would only allow one to produce a copy of the transportee at the remote location which is chemically perfectly arranged in every ~nanometer-sized voxel, but is also as dead as a doornail.

cheers
 
2013-05-16 06:44:47 PM
"'Star Trek' tech No. 1: Warp drives "

That's "almost" here? Stopped reading there, this nut case needs his meds checked.
 
2013-05-16 06:55:24 PM

BafflerMeal: Feh, for me, I want to know how at many different times across the years they have shown characters interacting and talking *during* transport. With audible undistorted voices, etc...


Very infrequently. Not at all in TOS, because the special effects required for beaming wouldn't allow for it.

They always seem to be stationary in transit in TNG too, as far as i can remember.

I think I remember seeing a trek movie that had a transporter failure that involved someone screaming, but I have no clear memory.
 
2013-05-16 06:57:58 PM

fluffy2097: BafflerMeal: Feh, for me, I want to know how at many different times across the years they have shown characters interacting and talking *during* transport. With audible undistorted voices, etc...

Very infrequently. Not at all in TOS, because the special effects required for beaming wouldn't allow for it.

They always seem to be stationary in transit in TNG too, as far as i can remember.

I think I remember seeing a trek movie that had a transporter failure that involved someone screaming, but I have no clear memory.



Off the top of my head, in wrath of Khan Kirk is having a conversation with Savik when beaming up out of the genesis cave. And in TNG, I believe it's a Barclay episode where he can see aliens who live in the transporter beam and no one believes him.
 
2013-05-16 07:02:37 PM

BafflerMeal: fluffy2097: BafflerMeal: Feh, for me, I want to know how at many different times across the years they have shown characters interacting and talking *during* transport. With audible undistorted voices, etc...

Very infrequently. Not at all in TOS, because the special effects required for beaming wouldn't allow for it.

They always seem to be stationary in transit in TNG too, as far as i can remember.

I think I remember seeing a trek movie that had a transporter failure that involved someone screaming, but I have no clear memory.


Off the top of my head, in wrath of Khan Kirk is having a conversation with Savik when beaming up out of the genesis cave. And in TNG, I believe it's a Barclay episode where he can see aliens who live in the transporter beam and no one believes him.



Yep, on netflix.  Wrath of Khan Around 1:17.  They are all having a conversation during transport.

---

TNG episode: Real of Fear for Barclay:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realm_of_Fear
 
2013-05-16 07:11:04 PM

BafflerMeal: I think I remember seeing a trek movie that had a transporter failure that involved someone screaming, but I have no clear memory.


TMP - its why Spock ended up  on board Enterprise.
 
2013-05-16 08:12:30 PM

BafflerMeal: , I believe it's a Barclay episode where he can see aliens who live in the transporter beam and no one believes him.


shiat, you're right. That's an exception. Was HE able to move in that episode? or just the creatures?

He was always a weird character. It's like they had 2 different plot lines for him, and just ran them one after another, even though it means he goes through his "awkward social outlier" phase on the ship twice for no apparent reason.
 
2013-05-16 08:14:32 PM

Felgraf: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: PsyLord: When I saw that #1 was the Warp Drive, I stopped.  Seriously, almost there with the Warp Drive?  The article writer is a double dumb-@ss.

Could happen 500 years from now after lots of painstaking incremental research. Could happen tomorrow in some RA's lab. A warp drive is the kind of thing that can be discovered by sheer dumb luck.

Well, there is a *theoretical* warp drive that the math works out for. The problems are

A) It requires an exotic form of matter that we're *NOT SURE EXISTS YET*.

B) It requires the mass-energy of the voyager probe. (This is an improvement: The initial one required the mass-energy *of Jupiter*)

C) It kind of kills everything in front of it when you stop it (massive gamma ray burst). So you'd have to (if you could ever actually build and fuel one) sort of.. point it *parallel* to your intended destination, stop a ways out, then putter in at sublight speeds.


All good points. But it is still just one "effect" rather than an entire technology that has to be invented. Stumble across the effect, or some good substitute thereof, and the tech and development will follow.
 
2013-05-16 08:22:45 PM

fluffy2097: BafflerMeal: , I believe it's a Barclay episode where he can see aliens who live in the transporter beam and no one believes him.

shiat, you're right. That's an exception. Was HE able to move in that episode? or just the creatures?

He was always a weird character. It's like they had 2 different plot lines for him, and just ran them one after another, even though it means he goes through his "awkward social outlier" phase on the ship twice for no apparent reason.



Yep, he was able to move.  In fact he pulled the 'alien' out with him.  Turned out to be someone 'lost' in the transporter beams.
 
2013-05-16 08:41:39 PM

MrEricSir: Unlike any of the items in the slideshow, the CommBadge is only a couple months from shipping.


Meh, Vocera was doing most of that crap (badly) a decade ago.
 
2013-05-16 08:43:38 PM
www.lexiconn.com

Captain, we can't hold this thread together much longer.  I need time!!!!!
 
2013-05-16 08:45:00 PM

PsyLord: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: PsyLord: When I saw that #1 was the Warp Drive, I stopped.  Seriously, almost there with the Warp Drive?  The article writer is a double dumb-@ss.

Could happen 500 years from now after lots of painstaking incremental research. Could happen tomorrow in some RA's lab. A warp drive is the kind of thing that can be discovered by sheer dumb luck.

Yeah, I hate to be anywhere close when he accidentally the whole thing and nukes the world since according to the latest ideas, when the warp bubble collapses, it obliterates all matter in front of it.


Well, yeah, that could happen. Yes, it would suck. But the survivors would have a star drive, right? Assuming he took notes....

I remember an old SF short story called Adam and No Eve where the "protragonist" accidentally destroys the world when a little bit of unburned catalyst from his experimental rocket engine escapes and destroys all the world's iron.

Energy sources. Wiki something called the Casimir Effect. Remember the ZPMs in Stargate? Yeah.

About that surge of gamma rays out the front. Maybe someone will figure out a way to convert that energy to electricity and put it in one honkin' big capacitor.

Etc.
 
2013-05-16 08:59:47 PM
Holy shartsnax! The advertising on that page is horrible!!
 
2013-05-16 09:34:12 PM

metallion: I just wish automatic doors would make that cool sound.. :)


Shhht, shhht.
 
2013-05-16 09:42:08 PM

metallion: Tommy Moo: No way is teleporting more than a quantum particle "almost here." And even if it was, I'd never do it. No one stops to think that the people in Star Trek die every time they use a teleporter, and are replaced with an exact copy of themselves at the other end.

There was a story in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in either '79 or early '80, about teleport technology.  Can't remember the name.

It opens with the inventer of the technology watching people getting in and out of the transports.  She meets a young boy who has teleported everywhere, and she has a couple of flashbacks.

One is creating the technology, and two, is how to solve the fact that it's not truly teleport tech as much as it is copy tech.  When you teleport, your dna/body stats are read, and then you are electrocuted with enough voltage to turn you to ash, and the data is transmitted to the destination, where you are rebuilt.

She is afraid that if she teleports, she'll lose her soul.

It ends up with the kid picking her up, and tossing her into the teleporter, and when she rematerilizes, she realizes that it isn't that bad.

It's been a long time since I read that, but it was a fun read.


I remember one where a teleporter malfunctioned and created a copy which was left behind. The other one went on his merry way and was none the wiser. It was the job of the attendant on duty to kill the copy because there couldn't be two of the same people walking around. I remember some bargaining, pleading, and crying. Very creepy, sad story.
 
2013-05-16 09:45:09 PM

LDM90: I remember one where a teleporter malfunctioned and created a copy which was left behind. The other one went on his merry way and was none the wiser. It was the job of the attendant on duty to kill the copy because there couldn't be two of the same people walking around. I remember some bargaining, pleading, and crying. Very creepy, sad story.


That one got adapted to an Outer Limits episode
 
2013-05-16 09:47:40 PM
 
2013-05-16 09:52:49 PM
Cool, thanks!
 
2013-05-16 10:14:59 PM

LDM90: metallion: Tommy Moo: No way is teleporting more than a quantum particle "almost here." And even if it was, I'd never do it. No one stops to think that the people in Star Trek die every time they use a teleporter, and are replaced with an exact copy of themselves at the other end.

There was a story in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in either '79 or early '80, about teleport technology.  Can't remember the name.

It opens with the inventer of the technology watching people getting in and out of the transports.  She meets a young boy who has teleported everywhere, and she has a couple of flashbacks.

One is creating the technology, and two, is how to solve the fact that it's not truly teleport tech as much as it is copy tech.  When you teleport, your dna/body stats are read, and then you are electrocuted with enough voltage to turn you to ash, and the data is transmitted to the destination, where you are rebuilt.

She is afraid that if she teleports, she'll lose her soul.

It ends up with the kid picking her up, and tossing her into the teleporter, and when she rematerilizes, she realizes that it isn't that bad.

It's been a long time since I read that, but it was a fun read.

I remember one where a teleporter malfunctioned and created a copy which was left behind. The other one went on his merry way and was none the wiser. It was the job of the attendant on duty to kill the copy because there couldn't be two of the same people walking around. I remember some bargaining, pleading, and crying. Very creepy, sad story.


I'll just leave this here for you then
 
2013-05-16 10:36:13 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Energy sources. Wiki something called the Casimir Effect.


Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?
 
2013-05-16 11:05:45 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Energy sources. Wiki something called the Casimir Effect.

Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?


Duh. Thats the basic element of an interociter.
 
2013-05-16 11:21:31 PM

timujin: Also, don't forget transparent aluminum which is actually already here.


perfect for invisible tinfol hats
 
2013-05-16 11:24:02 PM

thisiszombocom: timujin: Also, don't forget transparent aluminum which is actually already here.

perfect for invisible tinfol hats


For all you can see, I'm wearing one right now
 
2013-05-16 11:31:22 PM

loonatic112358: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Think_Like_a_Dinosaur_(The_Outer_Limits )

http://www.amazon.com/Think-Like-Dinosaur-Other-Stories/dp/193084620 7

http://www.hulu.com/watch/69830


Thanks, I tried watching the hulu link, and good people, interesting plot, and sheesh hulu half way through it and 9 commercials, click away, no thank you. Stupid money losing hulu.

But thank you for the links.
 
2013-05-16 11:34:03 PM

Tommy Moo: No way is teleporting more than a quantum particle "almost here." And even if it was, I'd never do it. No one stops to think that the people in Star Trek die every time they use a teleporter, and are replaced with an exact copy of themselves at the other end.


I don't really want to be teleported, but I've always wondered how much of Dr. McCoy's medical technology was shared with the transporter. Imagine if we had the ability to teleport and get rid of kidney stones, cholesterol build up in veins and arteries, repair strokes caused by blocked blood vessels. even inoperable cancers.
So many things that are too small or delicate to be done manually that could be done as long as the transporter can get it's field down that small.
 
2013-05-17 01:05:41 AM

Felgraf: Ah damnit I have an extraneous U in the first equation. That's a typo, please ignore.


Teleportation, yo!
 
2013-05-17 02:19:35 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Energy sources. Wiki something called the Casimir Effect.

Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?


Didn't read TFA, did you?
 
2013-05-17 03:45:21 AM

timujin: TheHighlandHowler: me neither, but don't waste your time.

http://www.cio.com/slideshow/detail/101238/10-Star-Trek-Technologies -T hat-are-Almost-Here#slide12

Don't waste your time with that, either.  Deslidefied




fark you racist.
assets.rollingstone.com
 
2013-05-17 04:14:38 AM

StoPPeRmobile: fark you racist.


whointhewhatnow?

Meh, anyway, I saw that live, it was pretty fun.  Not perfect, but fun nonetheless.  I'm wondering how long it'll be until watching that is like looking back on the CGI from The Last Starfighter.
 
2013-05-17 04:23:47 AM

timujin: StoPPeRmobile: fark you racist.

whointhewhatnow?

Meh, anyway, I saw that live, it was pretty fun.  Not perfect, but fun nonetheless.  I'm wondering how long it'll be until watching that is like looking back on the CGI from The Last Starfighter.




Like something from Universal Studios or Disney.

/I keed
 
2013-05-17 05:17:39 AM

PsyLord: When I saw that #1 was the Warp Drive, I stopped.  Seriously, almost there with the Warp Drive?  The article writer is a double dumb-@ss.


Why? All we need is a ton of antimatter and some negative energy.

I'm filled to the brim with negative energy, so you bring the antimatter and we'll be good to go.
 
2013-05-17 05:50:53 AM

ArcadianRefugee: Kinda my point. Anyone who realizes this would probably never use one, especially if they believe in the concept of souls.


You sir, are clearly not an early adopter.  :)
 
2013-05-17 06:16:05 AM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Energy sources. Wiki something called the Casimir Effect.

Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?

Didn't read TFA, did you?


I'm not talking sci-fi here, just basic run-of-the-mill high school physics concepts.

Are two magnets attracting each other an energy source?
 
2013-05-17 06:43:35 AM
And to think, the only reason the transporter exists at all is because they couldn't afford a shuttlecraft in the first season.
 
2013-05-17 11:54:59 AM

Shazam999: Felgraf: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: PsyLord: When I saw that #1 was the Warp Drive, I stopped.  Seriously, almost there with the Warp Drive?  The article writer is a double dumb-@ss.

Could happen 500 years from now after lots of painstaking incremental research. Could happen tomorrow in some RA's lab. A warp drive is the kind of thing that can be discovered by sheer dumb luck.

Well, there is a *theoretical* warp drive that the math works out for. The problems are

A) It requires an exotic form of matter that we're *NOT SURE EXISTS YET*.

B) It requires the mass-energy of the voyager probe. (This is an improvement: The initial one required the mass-energy *of Jupiter*)

C) It kind of kills everything in front of it when you stop it (massive gamma ray burst). So you'd have to (if you could ever actually build and fuel one) sort of.. point it *parallel* to your intended destination, stop a ways out, then putter in at sublight speeds.

I wonder about the gamma ray bursts. Should we be looking for these things somehow?  Maybe other intelligent civilizations have invented this form of warp drive?


Maybe we have already seen them and misidentified them?
 
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