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(Humans Invent)   You can always access the internet with BRCK, wherever you are in the world   (humansinvent.com) divider line 33
    More: Cool, BRCK  
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3640 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 May 2013 at 8:17 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-16 08:18:05 AM  
You can always access the internet with BRCK Ham Radio, wherever you are in the world

FTFY Subby.  You can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still have access with an HF radio, a computer, and a simple piece of software.
 
2013-05-16 08:23:01 AM  
maleysbhoys.com
 
2013-05-16 08:31:44 AM  
24.media.tumblr.com


pic is borrowed
 
2013-05-16 08:31:53 AM  
So it is a smartphone that can only be used to tether? And also isn't a smartphone?
 
2013-05-16 08:38:41 AM  
What do you do if you brick the BRCK?
 
2013-05-16 08:55:22 AM  
If it had satellite capability (presumably when no other connectivity is available), it would be incredibly useful for extremely remote areas or for dropping/smuggling into areas that have extensive censorship (think Arab Spring countries, China, etc.).
 
2013-05-16 08:56:58 AM  

dittybopper: You can always access the internet with BRCK Ham Radio, wherever you are in the world

FTFY Subby.  You can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still have access with an HF radio, a computer, and a simple piece of software.


Do you have a link explaning how to do this?
 
2013-05-16 09:11:54 AM  

Teknowaffle: So it is a smartphone that can only be used to tether? And also isn't a smartphone?


Sort of, it can be used as a traditional AP connected to a land based internet service and/or another wifi connection and seamlessly switch to 3G/4G in the event you lose your primary connection. It makes sense in an area that has spotty connectivity.
 
2013-05-16 09:13:04 AM  
xbox360media.ign.com
 
2013-05-16 09:13:56 AM  
or....
si0.twimg.com
 
2013-05-16 09:35:56 AM  
I've been to many places where the BRCK would be a brick, and I don't even have a farking passport.

Maybe all of Africa has 3G/4G at this point, but here in the U S of Ameristan, there are lots and lots and lots of thoroughly dead zones. And I'm not just talking about Green Bank.

Never mind the overloading or collapse of cellular infrastructure that happens in any actual large-scale disaster.
 
2013-05-16 10:05:50 AM  
Loves his BRCK:
 
2013-05-16 10:07:37 AM  

enry: Loves his BRCK:


[frjackhackett.png]

/sigh
 
2013-05-16 10:42:12 AM  

sjmcc13: dittybopper: You can always access the internet with BRCK Ham Radio, wherever you are in the world

FTFY Subby.  You can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still have access with an HF radio, a computer, and a simple piece of software.

Do you have a link explaning how to do this?


You could have clicked the link I added, but just in case you need extry help:
http://www.winlink.org/
 
2013-05-16 10:43:18 AM  

SmackLT: [maleysbhoys.com image 450x338]


Came here for that. {lights cigrarette}. Leaving satisfied.
 
2013-05-16 10:44:19 AM  

xanadian: What do you do if you brick the BRCK?


Then you'll be shiatting bricks.
 
2013-05-16 11:40:11 AM  
Could you play Brick Roulette with it? I don't think it would stand up to that, and don't even get me started on Brick Conquerors.

You could probably do Jump Over the Brick, though.

Probably.
 
2013-05-16 02:29:51 PM  
Sorry, No you can't. You can't connect from "anywhere" in the world. I can drive about 6 hours and get no cell service . I'll also be nowhere within WiFi service, and definitely won't have an ethernet port to plug into, so my BRCK will just be a brick. Southern Utah/Northern Arizona has spotty cell coverage, and when Jacob Lake is 60 miles from the North Rim with a small campground in between, you aren't going to be stumbling across anyone's WiFi, either. Even the South Rim has dead spots, and that where the crowds are, and it's only 60 miles from an actual town and an interstate highway.

There are plenty of other places like this in the US, I'm sure, let alone the world.
 
2013-05-16 03:22:17 PM  

Mikey1969: Sorry, No you can't. You can't connect from "anywhere" in the world. I can drive about 6 hours and get no cell service . I'll also be nowhere within WiFi service, and definitely won't have an ethernet port to plug into, so my BRCK will just be a brick. Southern Utah/Northern Arizona has spotty cell coverage, and when Jacob Lake is 60 miles from the North Rim with a small campground in between, you aren't going to be stumbling across anyone's WiFi, either. Even the South Rim has dead spots, and that where the crowds are, and it's only 60 miles from an actual town and an interstate highway.

There are plenty of other places like this in the US, I'm sure, let alone the world.


Oddly enough, I *CAN* connect from anywhere in the World.  Assuming, of course, that I have some source of electricity.
 
2013-05-16 03:50:38 PM  

dittybopper: Mikey1969: Sorry, No you can't. You can't connect from "anywhere" in the world. I can drive about 6 hours and get no cell service . I'll also be nowhere within WiFi service, and definitely won't have an ethernet port to plug into, so my BRCK will just be a brick. Southern Utah/Northern Arizona has spotty cell coverage, and when Jacob Lake is 60 miles from the North Rim with a small campground in between, you aren't going to be stumbling across anyone's WiFi, either. Even the South Rim has dead spots, and that where the crowds are, and it's only 60 miles from an actual town and an interstate highway.

There are plenty of other places like this in the US, I'm sure, let alone the world.

Oddly enough, I *CAN* connect from anywhere in the World.  Assuming, of course, that I have some source of electricity.


With a satellite phone, sure. Not if you aren't getting 3g, 4G, WiFi or ethernet otherwise. As for electricity, at least this thing has a battery, so that's covered.
 
2013-05-16 04:11:42 PM  

Mikey1969: With a satellite phone, sure. Not if you aren't getting 3g, 4G, WiFi or ethernet otherwise. As for electricity, at least this thing has a battery, so that's covered.


Nope, I can do it with HF radio, as I pointed out above.

I can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still be connected.
 
2013-05-16 04:14:44 PM  

dittybopper: Mikey1969: With a satellite phone, sure. Not if you aren't getting 3g, 4G, WiFi or ethernet otherwise. As for electricity, at least this thing has a battery, so that's covered.

Nope, I can do it with HF radio, as I pointed out above.

I can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still be connected.


Shiat, I meant to ask about that, I've never heard about it. How does it work? What's the bandwidth like? What exactly are you connecting to on the other end? This doesn't fix the incorrect premise of TFA, but it definitely sounds cool, I just didn't realize people were doing it.
 
2013-05-16 04:20:38 PM  

dittybopper: sjmcc13: dittybopper: You can always access the internet with BRCK Ham Radio, wherever you are in the world

FTFY Subby.  You can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still have access with an HF radio, a computer, and a simple piece of software.

Do you have a link explaning how to do this?

You could have clicked the link I added, but just in case you need extry help:
http://www.winlink.org/


Yeah, not only was your link not obvious on my own phone(the link color blends in too well with the rest of the text), but your Wiki page isn't all that informative. I wonder if the other darker noticed the same thing? Maybe being a dick wasn't the proper response?
 
2013-05-16 06:50:11 PM  

Mikey1969: dittybopper: sjmcc13: dittybopper: You can always access the internet with BRCK Ham Radio, wherever you are in the world

FTFY Subby.  You can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still have access with an HF radio, a computer, and a simple piece of software.

Do you have a link explaning how to do this?

You could have clicked the link I added, but just in case you need extry help:
http://www.winlink.org/

Yeah, not only was your link not obvious on my own phone(the link color blends in too well with the rest of the text), but your Wiki page isn't all that informative. I wonder if the other darker noticed the same thing? Maybe being a dick wasn't the proper response?


Mikey....HAMmers possess the ability to get uber-cranky at the drop of a hat. Goes with the territory I assume.

/no offense ditty...I know quite a few HAM radio guys, and rib them frequently about it. They tell me it's 12ax7 radiation, whatever that means. Probably an inside joke.
 
2013-05-16 07:30:19 PM  
Yes, but has it been approved by the Elders of the Internet?
 
2013-05-16 07:42:28 PM  

Mikey1969: dittybopper: Mikey1969: With a satellite phone, sure. Not if you aren't getting 3g, 4G, WiFi or ethernet otherwise. As for electricity, at least this thing has a battery, so that's covered.

Nope, I can do it with HF radio, as I pointed out above.

I can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still be connected.

Shiat, I meant to ask about that, I've never heard about it. How does it work? What's the bandwidth like? What exactly are you connecting to on the other end? This doesn't fix the incorrect premise of TFA, but it definitely sounds cool, I just didn't realize people were doing it.


Bandwidth is narrow.  *VERY* narrow.  We're talking like 67 to 1300 bps depending on the conditions.  Good enough for e-mails and the like, so long as you don't send or receive huge attachments.

You need a ham radio license, and an HF radio with a decent antenna and you also need the proper software on your computer.   You also need cables to go between the sound card on the computer and the radio.  You have to register with the service, so they can verify you are a ham, but it's free.

The way it works is that there are numerous stations around the World that act as 'gateways' between HF and the internet.  So long as the ionosphere will support propagation to one of them between your location and the location of any one of the gateways, you can log in and send and receive e-mail.

The software interfaces with common e-mail software like Microsoft Outlook so you are sending and receiving with your normal e-mail system.

It's not limited to HF, either:  It can be done locally using the high-powered ham version of WiFi (which can have a range of miles, with the proper antennas), or on UHF or VHF for even longer ranges at slower speeds.

There are ways of surfing the web via ham radio, but it's not commonly done because of bandwidth issues and also because the type of stuff you can send and receive over ham radio is limited by international treaty and national laws, to avoid conflict with commercial and government communication services.

But the capability is there:  You can set up a way to communicate over the internet via ham radio, meaning you could be  thousands of miles away from the nearest internet access and still be able to send e-mails back and forth.
 
2013-05-16 07:43:34 PM  

Head_Shot: Mikey1969: dittybopper: sjmcc13: dittybopper: You can always access the internet with BRCK Ham Radio, wherever you are in the world

FTFY Subby.  You can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still have access with an HF radio, a computer, and a simple piece of software.

Do you have a link explaning how to do this?

You could have clicked the link I added, but just in case you need extry help:
http://www.winlink.org/

Yeah, not only was your link not obvious on my own phone(the link color blends in too well with the rest of the text), but your Wiki page isn't all that informative. I wonder if the other darker noticed the same thing? Maybe being a dick wasn't the proper response?

Mikey....HAMmers possess the ability to get uber-cranky at the drop of a hat. Goes with the territory I assume.

/no offense ditty...I know quite a few HAM radio guys, and rib them frequently about it. They tell me it's 12ax7 radiation, whatever that means. Probably an inside joke.


In my case, it's 12BY7A radiation driving two 6146Bs....
 
2013-05-16 08:11:35 PM  

dittybopper: Mikey1969: dittybopper: Mikey1969: With a satellite phone, sure. Not if you aren't getting 3g, 4G, WiFi or ethernet otherwise. As for electricity, at least this thing has a battery, so that's covered.

Nope, I can do it with HF radio, as I pointed out above.

I can be thousands of miles from the nearest access point and still be connected.

Shiat, I meant to ask about that, I've never heard about it. How does it work? What's the bandwidth like? What exactly are you connecting to on the other end? This doesn't fix the incorrect premise of TFA, but it definitely sounds cool, I just didn't realize people were doing it.

Bandwidth is narrow.  *VERY* narrow.  We're talking like 67 to 1300 bps depending on the conditions.  Good enough for e-mails and the like, so long as you don't send or receive huge attachments.

You need a ham radio license, and an HF radio with a decent antenna and you also need the proper software on your computer.   You also need cables to go between the sound card on the computer and the radio.  You have to register with the service, so they can verify you are a ham, but it's free.

The way it works is that there are numerous stations around the World that act as 'gateways' between HF and the internet.  So long as the ionosphere will support propagation to one of them between your location and the location of any one of the gateways, you can log in and send and receive e-mail.

The software interfaces with common e-mail software like Microsoft Outlook so you are sending and receiving with your normal e-mail system.

It's not limited to HF, either:  It can be done locally using the high-powered ham version of WiFi (which can have a range of miles, with the proper antennas), or on UHF or VHF for even longer ranges at slower speeds.

There are ways of surfing the web via ham radio, but it's not commonly done because of bandwidth issues and also because the type of stuff you can send and receive over ham radio is limited by international treaty and national laws, to avoid conflict with commercial and government communication services.

But the capability is there:  You can set up a way to communicate over the internet via ham radio, meaning you could be  thousands of miles away from the nearest internet access and still be able to send e-mails back and forth.


Wow, that's pretty cool. I definitely like the concept. Thanks for the explanation, much better than the Wiki page.
 
2013-05-16 08:42:28 PM  
pffft. Call me when the internet goes telepathic.
 
2013-05-16 09:20:05 PM  

Mikey1969: Wow, that's pretty cool. I definitely like the concept. Thanks for the explanation, much better than the Wiki page.


One of the really, really cool things about ham radio is that it's cutting edge, but most people, even most hams, don't realize it.

For instance, we were using handheld radios through repeaters to make phone calls in the 1970's.  You know, before anyone had cell phones.  We were doing wireless networking back in the early 1980s.  We had texting before cell phones had the capability.  Hell, my first personal e-mail address was [my callsign]@KA2TCQ.AMPR.ORG back in the early 1990's.  I had to hit it wirelessly, and I was about 100 miles away from that gateway.  We had position reporting with Tweet-like messages back in the early 1990's.

If you take a look at the cutting edge of ham radio now, that's what you'll be doing in 10 to 15 years, but it will be much smaller, and much faster (naturally).

I do some of that stuff, but I'm still old-school:  My favorite mode is Morse code.  That doesn't mean there isn't some next-level shiat going on though:  Ham radio embraces both the old and the new, which is why it's a great hobby and a valuable tool when all the communications infrastructure comes crashing down.
 
2013-05-16 09:21:37 PM  

italie: pffft. Call me when the internet goes telepathic.


Did you say "telegraphic"?  'Cause I'm down with that Victorian Internet.
 
2013-05-17 07:10:18 AM  

dittybopper: italie: pffft. Call me when the internet goes telepathic.

Did you say "telegraphic"?  'Cause I'm down with that Victorian Internet.



♫ Winchester Cathedral ...zzzzp...thedral....zzzp....thedral....♫
 
2013-05-17 08:10:37 AM  

italie: dittybopper: italie: pffft. Call me when the internet goes telepathic.

Did you say "telegraphic"?  'Cause I'm down with that Victorian Internet.


♫ Winchester Cathedral ...zzzzp...thedral....zzzp....thedral....♫


d.gr-assets.com


People don't really realize that the biggest leap in information technology happened in the mid-19th Century.  Prior to that, you could only send a message as fast as a man on a horse, or the fastest ship, could travel.  Once the telegraph was invented and the infrastructure expanded and grew, you could send a message across the country in under an hour instead of in a couple of weeks at best.

Going from less than one hour down to one second is less of an improvement.
 
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