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(LA Times)   NASA places planet-hunting telescope Kepler in "safe mode". Would boot to diagnostic partition if only someone could hit F12 fast enough   (latimes.com) divider line 31
    More: Followup, telescopes, planets, NASA, Kepler, safe mode, Kepler space telescope, three-dimensional space, IAU definition of planet  
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805 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 May 2013 at 8:41 AM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-05-16 08:47:05 AM
That only works is you're booting to a PXE mode. In Windows, it's F8 for start up selection modes.
/Don't remember what key it is for Linux because really, who cares? I mean, look at all those awesome games you can play.
 
2013-05-16 09:03:07 AM
Someone needs to get up there with a BARTs CD stat!
 
2013-05-16 09:12:03 AM
I'll just get this out of the way: No, the space shuttle would not have been able to service Kepler. It orbits the sun and falls farther behind Earth each day (but not quickly enough that we'll catch up to it any time soon).
 
2013-05-16 09:13:50 AM
The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways. Why send up a planet-hunting satellite that isn't powerful enough to look for planets that may actually be of use to us?

Get back to me when you've got one that can scan for surface water and actual Earth-sized planets (not this "Super Earth" bullshiat) and then I'll be impressed.
 
2013-05-16 09:21:56 AM

Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways.


Sigh.
 
2013-05-16 09:38:12 AM

dukeblue219: Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways.

Sigh.


I'll concede that failure is an incorrect description. It has done plenty to further out understanding, and I respect that. However, my initial point still stands. Build a satellite that can actually hunt for useful planets. Being able to point out more rocks in the sky isn't as grand of an accomplishment as being able to point out rocks in the sky that we, or another race, could actually live on.
 
2013-05-16 09:38:34 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IfnjBHtjHc

I think this one is right...don't have sound on this computer but I think it is the part needed.
 
2013-05-16 09:41:07 AM

Esroc: However, my initial point still stands.


Yes, but the pants you have on your head are covering it.Which is good, come to think of it. You might put somebody's eye out with it.
 
2013-05-16 09:44:11 AM

CheatCommando: Esroc: However, my initial point still stands.

Yes, but the pants you have on your head are covering it.Which is good, come to think of it. You might put somebody's eye out with it.


So am I to understand by your snark that one shouldn't wish for more progress? That one should just be happy with what we got and call it a day?  Forgive me for being optimistic enough to think we as a species could accomplish more.
 
2013-05-16 09:49:33 AM

Esroc: CheatCommando: Esroc: However, my initial point still stands.

Yes, but the pants you have on your head are covering it.Which is good, come to think of it. You might put somebody's eye out with it.

So am I to understand by your snark that one shouldn't wish for more progress? That one should just be happy with what we got and call it a day?  Forgive me for being optimistic enough to think we as a species could accomplish more.


No, from the snark you should infer that dismissing the progress we have made with snark of your own means that no one takes you seriously.
 
2013-05-16 09:52:16 AM

Esroc: CheatCommando: Esroc: However, my initial point still stands.

Yes, but the pants you have on your head are covering it.Which is good, come to think of it. You might put somebody's eye out with it.

So am I to understand by your snark that one shouldn't wish for more progress? That one should just be happy with what we got and call it a day?  Forgive me for being optimistic enough to think we as a species could accomplish more.


Please explain how finding an earth sized planet with water on it in the next few decades around another star is going to be "of use to us" any more than what they are actually researching? Do you have a faster than light drive hanging around and you need somewhere to go with it?
 
2013-05-16 09:56:45 AM

Esroc: dukeblue219: Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways.

Sigh.

I'll concede that failure is an incorrect description. It has done plenty to further out understanding, and I respect that. However, my initial point still stands. Build a satellite that can actually hunt for useful planets. Being able to point out more rocks in the sky isn't as grand of an accomplishment as being able to point out rocks in the sky that we, or another race, could actually live on.


You have to start somewhere. It was only with the gathering of initial data on detecting gas giants that they have been able to detect smaller and smaller rocky planets. Being able to do spectrographic analysis of distant planets is massively more challenging when all you can currently see is a dip in the light emitted by the star it orbits.

shiatting on an excellent mission that has provided invaluable data because it doesn't tell us everything we possibly want to know right now is moronic.
 
2013-05-16 09:59:15 AM

entropic_existence: Esroc: dukeblue219: Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways.

shiatting on an excellent mission that has provided invaluable data because it doesn't tell us everything we possibly want to know right now is moronic.


Hence why I corrected myself, took back my comment, and admitted it was out of line.
 
2013-05-16 10:01:58 AM

Esroc: Build a satellite that can actually hunt for useful planets


There's not one person at NASA who would reject that project. It sounds like you have an understanding of the mission so I'll also assume you realize the distance scale we're talking about, here. The fact that we can detect a planet by the incredibly small dip in stellar brightness is pretty awesome. Being able to actually image a planet that is thousands of light years away would be  awesome. I'm all for that. You build that satellite for me and we'll get it launched.
 
2013-05-16 10:22:51 AM

Esroc: Hence why I corrected myself, took back my comment, and admitted it was out of line.


No you didn't.... you pull back the failure comment then proceed to still poop all over the mission.  If we had the ability to design a telescope that could detect relatively small planets and also detect if there was liquid water on their surface... don't you think they would send one of those up without even blinking?

Hell yeah they would... they would give everything they could to put up something like that.

They've only confirmed the existance of extra solar planets 20 years ago....  My god...  these things take time.  Do you think all they have to do is go all CSI and hit the 'enhance' button and see how the weather is on Rigal-5?

They can't just flip a switch... it takes time, research, testing, engineering..
 
2013-05-16 10:27:24 AM

Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways. Why send up a planet-hunting satellite that isn't powerful enough to look for planets that may actually be of use to us?

Get back to me when you've got one that can scan for surface water and actual Earth-sized planets (not this "Super Earth" bullshiat) and then I'll be impressed.


I'm a little torn, either a) You're trolling, b) You have absolutely no idea how this project, or planetary science works, or c) You're one of those people who doesn't believe in "perfect is the enemy of the good"

This project can find earth-sized planets in the habitable zone, it just takes time to sort through all the data, you need several orbits, plus ground-based observations to confirm the data.  A "super-earth" may have mass that is greater than the earth but the size diameter of the planet is not much bigger. Plus we've found a number of planets smaller than Earth (Kepler 42b, 42c, and 42d, for example) and planets that could have earth-like conditions even though they are slightly larger than earth.  Plus this project helped spur projects like the James Webb space telescope and the Terrestrial Planet Finder, which will do what you want them to do.

Understand that 20 years ago we didn't even know if there were any planets outside the solar system, and now we know over possibly over 2600 in a patch of sky consisting of 0.26% of the our observable galaxy.  If you don't think that's a monumental expansion in the understanding of the universe then nothing will quell that level of ignorance that you have displayed.
 
2013-05-16 10:28:12 AM

Esroc: entropic_existence: Esroc: dukeblue219: Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways.

shiatting on an excellent mission that has provided invaluable data because it doesn't tell us everything we possibly want to know right now is moronic.

Hence why I corrected myself, took back my comment, and admitted it was out of line.


Not really, this is the part of the conversation where you reread what you said, admit what you said was stupid, and apologize.

Then you stop trying to defend the stupid, and rejoin the conversation from a fresh slate where you agree the mission is/was successful as a starter point and talk about how you'd love to eventually see this or that in future missions.
 
2013-05-16 10:56:09 AM
Am I the only one who finds it ironic that one of the most sophisticated pieces of hardware in history was broken by the failure of one of the simplest piece of hardware in history?

/Seriously guys, figure out the wheel
 
2013-05-16 10:56:36 AM

IMEI: That only works is you're booting to a PXE mode. In Windows, it's F8 for start up selection modes.
/Don't remember what key it is for Linux because really, who cares? I mean, look at all those awesome games you can play.


It's hardware problem - a second reaction wheel has failed and it's probably ended the usefulness of Kepler's mission.

Shoulda bought'm from someone besides Goodrich.  They've had rash of failures.  Thales worked up a software patch for Globalstar (commercial) satellites that allows them to work with only 2 of 4 Goodrich reaction wheels functioning.  However, my understanding is that kind of patch isn't good enough to allow the attitude control that Keplar needs.
 
2013-05-16 11:12:42 AM
Plus... at least according to the article, they knew these wheels would fail at some point, so it was a matter of when, not if.

Shame though...  lately, their missions have often gone WAY past their designed limits (like the Opportunity rover has) too bad they didn't have the same luck.
 
2013-05-16 12:08:00 PM

Esroc: dukeblue219: Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways.

Sigh.

I'll concede that failure is an incorrect description. It has done plenty to further out understanding, and I respect that. However, my initial point still stands. Build a satellite that can actually hunt for useful planets. Being able to point out more rocks in the sky isn't as grand of an accomplishment as being able to point out rocks in the sky that we, or another race, could actually live on.


Another sigh.

The reason it's found super Earths close to the sun is because the methods Kepler uses require multiple orbits (via "transits" that dim the star Kepler is looking at) by a potential candidate planet. Therefore, things that are big and have short orbital periods are found first. Earthlike planets need a couple of years to detect.

If you want us to remotely sense water vapor on an extra-solar planet, well, that's a great idea. And we may have the capability to do that, too. But we need to know where those likely planets are first. Hence, Kepler.
 
2013-05-16 01:01:01 PM
This space mission did more to show how tiny we are than any other before it. We went from being alone, to having nine, wait, eight neighbors, to having 20 some exoplanets, to having thousands of possible exoplanets after looking at just an tiny fraction of what's out there over the course of just a few years. Had Kepler been able to go indefinitely and with enough scientists to translate the data, everyone on Earth would eventually be able to name their own planet. It's almost like if someone in 900 AD Europe was able to build a telescope strong enough to see North America, but instead of seeing one continent, they saw thousands with no real end in sight.
 
2013-05-16 01:19:17 PM
If only there was some way we could get up there and fix it?

Oh that's right, NASA was diverted to helping Islamic countries.  Thanks, Obama.
 
2013-05-16 03:13:38 PM
They should delete system32. It'll make it run faster.
 
2013-05-16 03:50:32 PM
So sad that Kepler's mission is likely over.  The longer it stayed in service...the more likely it was to detect small rocky worlds in earth-like orbits.  It really would have been nice to get a couple more years out of it.

I'd love to see NASA make a second generation Kepler.  I'd be willing to bet the team that designed the first one could make significant improvements in a second attempt.
 
2013-05-16 04:00:17 PM
Launch one of these suckers up with a copy of Gparted on it:

img.gawkerassets.com
 
2013-05-16 04:04:57 PM

Farkbert: So sad that Kepler's mission is likely over.  The longer it stayed in service...the more likely it was to detect small rocky worlds in earth-like orbits.  It really would have been nice to get a couple more years out of it.

I'd love to see NASA make a second generation Kepler.  I'd be willing to bet the team that designed the first one could make significant improvements in a second attempt.


Kepler's mission was originally only through 2012, but was recently extended, so what we've been getting recently was a bonus. Still sad, though.
 
2013-05-16 04:09:45 PM
Would boot to diagnostic partition if only someone could hit F12 fast enough

Too bad Craigslist screens ads looking for wankers.
 
2013-05-16 04:48:21 PM
Farkbert:

I'd love to see NASA make a second generation Kepler.  I'd be willing to bet the team that designed the first one could make significant improvements in a second attempt.

I just found out about TESS.  Won't launch until 2017, but I guess there's a plan in place.
 
2013-05-17 05:58:08 AM

Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways. Why send up a planet-hunting satellite that isn't powerful enough to look for planets that may actually be of use to us?

Get back to me when you've got one that can scan for surface water and actual Earth-sized planets (not this "Super Earth" bullshiat) and then I'll be impressed.


I bet they're pissed that they didn't ask your opinion before spending all those millions.
 
2013-05-17 07:05:44 PM

Esroc: entropic_existence: Esroc: dukeblue219: Esroc: The Kepler mission is a failure in my opinion anyways.

shiatting on an excellent mission that has provided invaluable data because it doesn't tell us everything we possibly want to know right now is moronic.

Hence why I corrected myself, took back my comment, and admitted it was out of line.


It's all good, man.  I at least have some humor and read your comments.  Comfort yourself in the fact you got yelled at by a bunch of geeks that don't know how to boot into safe mode.  One guy hit it at the top and then 20 shiate comments attacking you.  I don't really have a bird in this fight, but wanted to just ask those folks to pull out their nerd tampons and get on with their lives.
 
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