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(APM Marketplace)   The genetic test Angelina Jolie used was $4,000. Why? Because one company patented a gene and is the only company that provides the test   (marketplace.org ) divider line 53
    More: Asinine, Angelina Jolie, biotechnology company, consumer finance, NYU Langone Medical Center, positive test, circuit breakers, myriad, Myriad Genetics  
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1628 clicks; posted to Business » on 15 May 2013 at 8:14 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-15 06:28:17 PM  
This should be controlled by the Supreme Court's recent decision in Mayo v. Prometheus, where a biological function was held to be an unpatentable law of nature. Testing for the presence of stuff in the body is not in itself innovative.
 
2013-05-15 06:50:41 PM  
It [Myriad] added that more than one million women have been tested, and thanks to health insurance, their average cost was about $100.

So Myriad says the R&D cost them 500 million, at 4k per test and one million tests I'm getting 4 billion dollars...so 3.5 billion in profit.

I'm not saying it seems a bit much, but it seems a bit much.
 
2013-05-15 07:39:43 PM  
1phil4everyill.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-05-15 07:42:00 PM  
I think i've seen claims for this company.
 
2013-05-15 08:11:54 PM  
If you're uninsured, they will do the test for free if you meet financial and medical criteria.


But... "Due to regulatory limitations, patients who are recipients of government funded programs (ie, Medicaid, Medicare) or those that have any third-party insurance are not eligible to apply."

I do know that it was covered for my daughter under her Blue Cross/Blue Shield because of family history/risk factors.

Your mileage will certainly vary with your insurance and your family history.  I bet if you want the test you may need to knock on a few doors to get it covered.
 
2013-05-15 08:21:58 PM  
future headline:

"Man buys Angelina Jolie  breasts at Auction for 5 million dollars"

Company says "We saved them to make 5 million dollars in the future!"
 
2013-05-15 08:27:42 PM  
So, you have to take their word for it that their test is valid.
 
2013-05-15 08:28:29 PM  
Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.
 
2013-05-15 08:33:06 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.


The article says they own the gene.
 
2013-05-15 08:35:09 PM  
I would have patted her jeans.

/pre-op
 
2013-05-15 08:40:33 PM  
This kind of stuff is like patenting poo and anytime someone drops a load, they owe the company royalties.
 
2013-05-15 08:42:05 PM  

talkertopc: Mr. Eugenides: Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.

The article says they own the gene.


And it was on the internet so you know it's true!
 
2013-05-15 08:54:34 PM  
From Myriad's statement (PDF) linked to the story: "Nothing is more important to us than saving and improving lives."

And I had to stop reading right there before I put a foot through my LCD monitor.
/their stock price actually rose today after Jolie's OP-ED was published
//shareholders suck
 
2013-05-15 08:55:41 PM  
One more thing - I hope the ghost of Dr. Jonas Salk comes back to haunt their monkey asses forever.
 
2013-05-15 08:59:12 PM  
They invented the test so they get to charge what they want from it.

Unless they used tax payers money in some fashion I don't see any reason for outrage here.
 
2013-05-15 09:15:02 PM  

Nick Nostril: This kind of stuff is like patenting poo and anytime someone drops a load, they owe the company royalties.


Dude, you should float that past RIAA, they'll be all over it.
 
2013-05-15 09:27:48 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: talkertopc: Mr. Eugenides: Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.

The article says they own the gene.

And it was on the internet so you know it's true!


They own the patent on the isolated gene.
http://www.aclu.org/blog/tag/myriad-genetics

Can't link from phone. Anyway, this ridiculous patent has effectively prevented any research on new tests, because all genetic research (that would be relevant here) involves first isolating the gene (as cDNA). The patent needs to be struck down and SCOTUS needs to prevent this from ever happening again.
 
2013-05-15 09:32:05 PM  

CujoQuarrel: They invented the test so they get to charge what they want from it.

Unless they used tax payers money in some fashion I don't see any reason for outrage here.


Absolutely. The problem is that they claim this nobody else is allowed to invent any other test. And have, in fact, sued to prevent it. What they've done is unethical as hell and deserves as much scorn as we manage to heap upon them.
 
2013-05-15 09:34:23 PM  

Barfmaker: It [Myriad] added that more than one million women have been tested, and thanks to health insurance, their average cost was about $100.

So Myriad says the R&D cost them 500 million, at 4k per test and one million tests I'm getting 4 billion dollars...so 3.5 billion in profit.

I'm not saying it seems a bit much, but it seems a bit much.


If their profit per test 100%, but it's more likely to be 30 to 40% so more like 0.7 to 1.1 billion.
And then there are the dozen or so companies that spent about 100 million without ever getting that far and basically losing all of their investor's money, which Myriad was close to doing as well. It's a high risk, high reward business model. And ultimately, more money is probably lost than made.
 
2013-05-15 09:41:13 PM  
How much of that bullshiat half a billion dollar R&D was paid for with gov't and private foundation money?
 
2013-05-15 10:03:32 PM  
My doctor wanted me to take this test a few years ago, but the insurance company wouldn't cover it because the women in my family don't get breast cancer until their 50's and I was only in my late 20's at the time.  Apparently they'll cover it when I'm in my 40's.  /boggle
 
2013-05-15 10:15:39 PM  
I actually have a brother in law that works for a different company that has all the rights to do advance testing for a different genetic marker.  It's crazy, but legally valid.
 
2013-05-15 10:42:00 PM  

ChubbyTiger: Mr. Eugenides: talkertopc: Mr. Eugenides: Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.

The article says they own the gene.

And it was on the internet so you know it's true!

They own the patent on the isolated gene.
http://www.aclu.org/blog/tag/myriad-genetics

Can't link from phone. Anyway, this ridiculous patent has effectively prevented any research on new tests, because all genetic research (that would be relevant here) involves first isolating the gene (as cDNA). The patent needs to be struck down and SCOTUS needs to prevent this from ever happening again.


B-b-b-b-but, pink ribbons for the Cure!!
 
2013-05-15 10:48:10 PM  
clinton-blair agreement? wtf?
 
2013-05-15 10:52:19 PM  
Everything should be free for everybody.
 
2013-05-15 11:06:08 PM  

SDRR: Nick Nostril: This kind of stuff is like patenting poo and anytime someone drops a load, they owe the company royalties.

Dude, you should float that past RIAA, they'll be all over it.


Given the current state of modern music, I'd say they're way ahead on that one.
 
2013-05-15 11:10:46 PM  
I read an article once not sure if it was BS that if your blood is taken by a hospital is become their property, and if it had the cure for cancer or erectile dysfunction in it they can patent your genes and you are just left out there
 
2013-05-15 11:16:38 PM  
Myriad's position is that they can patent the end result of using a public-domain artificial process, Polymerase Chain Reaction, even though that end result is identical to the product of the natural method.
 
2013-05-15 11:17:11 PM  

ZAZ: This should be controlled by the Supreme Court's recent decision in Mayo v. Prometheus, where a biological function was held to be an unpatentable law of nature. Testing for the presence of stuff in the body is not in itself innovative.


It's currently being decided on with Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics you can read a bit about the case here.
 
2013-05-15 11:26:38 PM  
Came here looking for when the patent expires (I know it's 20 years, but I'm wondering when they filed)

Leaving disappointed...
 
2013-05-15 11:29:13 PM  
Oh, you thought the future of medicine would include people who weren't rich? Go back to Canada you communist.
 
2013-05-16 12:36:13 AM  
Socialized medicine sucks.
 
2013-05-16 01:13:11 AM  
Thank you SCOTUS
 
2013-05-16 01:42:14 AM  

Barfmaker: It [Myriad] added that more than one million women have been tested, and thanks to health insurance, their average cost was about $100.

So Myriad says the R&D cost them 500 million, at 4k per test and one million tests I'm getting 4 billion dollars...so 3.5 billion in profit.

I'm not saying it seems a bit much, but it seems a bit much.


Which is the problem with healthcare in america now, not that they cant get care, its that they can't afford it once they need it.
 
2013-05-16 03:01:23 AM  
Pitchforks and torches are in order over this whole issue.
 
2013-05-16 03:23:58 AM  

oryx: So, you have to take their word for it that their test is valid.


Yes, unless you're smart, which you clearly are not, you need to take the word of people who are smart to tell you what's up. It's how the world works you big dummy.
 
2013-05-16 03:43:40 AM  

ChubbyTiger: Mr. Eugenides: talkertopc: Mr. Eugenides: Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.

The article says they own the gene.

And it was on the internet so you know it's true!

They own the patent on the isolated gene.
http://www.aclu.org/blog/tag/myriad-genetics

Can't link from phone. Anyway, this ridiculous patent has effectively prevented any research on new tests, because all genetic research (that would be relevant here) involves first isolating the gene (as cDNA). The patent needs to be struck down and SCOTUS needs to prevent this from ever happening again.


So, do the research in China where copyright laws don't matter.
 
2013-05-16 05:36:50 AM  

steamingpile: Which is the problem with healthcare in america now, not that they cant get care, its that they can't afford it once they need it.


Are you some kind of pinko commie?

Don't you understand, 'merica is the greatest country on Earth because we don't got no jobs, can't get no healthcare, but Kim Kardashian can become insanely rich because she raw dogged some black guy in a movie and her sister is Chewbacca.
 
2013-05-16 06:25:30 AM  

talkertopc: Mr. Eugenides: Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.

The article says they own the gene.


There is a recent SCOTUS decision that would invalidate that claim, while leaving them with the patent on modified RNA they use in the test itself, if I am remembering what I heard at a meeting of food and drug lawyers recently correctly.
 
2013-05-16 07:11:42 AM  
I want to know why a or group of free share scientists and researchers didn't come up with this gene on their own ?

What wrong with the people who spent years getting advance degrees,thousands of hours and weekends in the lab.
Why couldn't they buy the lab equipment and then spending millions of man hours on research just hand it over for the good of the people.

Stupid ! It be as if Joe Biden actually charge rent on his estate home to the secret service for protecting him and his family.
 After all look how much the American people have given Joe over the decades. Give something back.
 
2013-05-16 07:14:53 AM  

wademh: And ultimately, more money is probably lost than made.


You are stupid as fark and should immediately leave the business tab.  If more money is lost than made, they wouldnt be spending the money in the first place.

/There is no money to be had in healthcare, guys.  Time to short!
 
2013-05-16 07:16:57 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: So, do the research in China where copyright laws don't matter.


You bring up an interesting point.  You could theoretically send your DNA sample out of country to be tested, and you yourself probably wouldnt be violating any laws.

/and a new business plan was born
 
2013-05-16 07:33:05 AM  

ZAZ: Testing for the presence of stuff in the body is not in itself innovative.


That's not really true. If I come up with a way to detect a hint of cancer from across the room with lasers, that's obviously patentable. If I invent a system for trolling through your DNA for certain markers, that  process should be patentable. But the patent should also be fairly narrow- you can't patent the act of checking DNA, or even checking DNA for specific markers, but you can patent the technique you use to do the screening.
 
2013-05-16 08:24:46 AM  
What's the big deal? She probably paid cash for the test. She's got the coin. I heard it was $3000 not $4000. That's a 33% increase.
 
2013-05-16 09:35:42 AM  

Dr.Mxyzptlk.: I want to know why a or group of free share scientists and researchers didn't come up with this gene on their own ?



Yeah, it's really too bad that these guys beat out all those free hippie commune research centers that do everything for free and don't pay anybody anything. I'm sure all of them where just riiiggghhttt on the edge of a breakthrough that would've provided free tests to every person on the planet.
 
2013-05-16 10:18:36 AM  

Alonjar: wademh: And ultimately, more money is probably lost than made.

You are stupid as fark and should immediately leave the business tab.  If more money is lost than made, they wouldnt be spending the money in the first place.

/There is no money to be had in healthcare, guys.  Time to short!


Oh go buy a clue, if you can afford it. More money has been lost in biotech than has been earned.
There are a few big winners. There are many medium losers. This is well known. People invest because they think they can tell the difference between winners and losers but history suggests that most can't.

Big Pharma has not cornered the market because, in part, they know that the rewards are few and far between. There are other structural reasons that small start-ups have a better chance of hitting a home run than large pharma but it's unclear you are prepared for the advanced lessons.
 
2013-05-16 10:53:35 AM  

talkertopc: Mr. Eugenides: Myriad owns the test, not the gene.  If you have your entire genome sequenced you can see if you have the BRCA genes without paying Myriad a dime.  Of course a full genome sequencing is about 10 grand right now, but the price is dropping fast.

Myriad sucks. I have personally opened the "your insurance didn't cover it, pay us 4 grand" mail from them.

The article says they own the gene.


The Wikipedia article is better reported, as usual.
 
2013-05-16 12:28:26 PM  

Dr.Mxyzptlk.: I want to know why a or group of free share scientists and researchers didn't come up with this gene on their own ?

What wrong with the people who spent years getting advance degrees,thousands of hours and weekends in the lab.
Why couldn't they buy the lab equipment and then spending millions of man hours on research just hand it over for the good of the people.

Stupid ! It be as if Joe Biden actually charge rent on his estate home to the secret service for protecting him and his family.
 After all look how much the American people have given Joe over the decades. Give something back.


Why should Myriad get to own the gene? The gene was initially described in this paper out of UC-Berkeley, not by Myriad. I need no knowledge of Myriad's work to target and sequence the gene. I'm not exactly PhD level, but I could probably throw together a beginning to end procedure that would do it in a couple of hours.

Patents are supposed to protect a solution to a problem. In the case of Myriad, they should absolutely be able to patent their test methodology. What they should not be able to do is stop people from developing something better. That's the kind of thing we're supposed to encourage.
 
2013-05-16 12:29:19 PM  

CujoQuarrel: They invented the test so they get to charge what they want from it.

Unless they used tax payers money in some fashion I don't see any reason for outrage here.


Read up on the problem. They've repeatedly tried to stop people from developing more efficient means to achieve the same ends.
 
2013-05-16 01:12:05 PM  
...As if I didn't need any further reasons NOT to get tested for the two nasty genetic conditions that run in my family (probable Lynch syndrome on the dad's side--fun with familial cancer syndromes from broken oncogenes that tend to show up as early colon cancer--and probable "Diabetes type 1.5" (a recently recognised form of adult-onset type 1 diabetes where the body attacks insulin rather than islet cells and tends to be misdiagnosed as a form of type II) on the maternal side of the family).

As if the prospect of being ditched by the insurance company wasn't scary enough (I know supposedly this becomes illegal in 2014--thank you, President Obama), as if the prospect of living with a genetic sword of Damocles for not one but two very expensive medical conditions wasn't enough (and Jesus H. McPherson, but I already have one in the form of asthma--the CHEAP maintenance inhalers are a good $125/month, fark you legislators for allowing drug companies to repatent meds just because they changed the gottverdammt propellant)...now I have to worry that the tests themselves will actually end up costing roughly as much as a new Kia because the insurance company can't be arsed to pay for them. :P

(And mind, I have fairly decent insurance.  Still, the cost factor does send me into pants-shiatting horrors...have I mentioned I also have complex PTSD and one of my triggers IS major financial dings?  Mother of Grud, but I'm damn surprised I didn't end up in hospital last year between the SO's hospitalisation and my own surgery for Reproductive Parts Issues...was quite convinced we were going to end up in a homeless shelter until I saw the statements from the insurance company showing they'd cover things.)

/yes, I know the "massive panic attack over money shiat" sounds odd...until you realise my family lived on the edge of poverty yet was ineligible for practically any assistance...thanks to my mother fully giving half the family income to her NARasite cult, and thus making ANY major expense in the household a major financial crisis as a result
//gattaca!  gattaca!  gattaca!
///and this, kids, is why I really really REALLY wish our government would find the intestinal fortitude to join the developed and even developing world and institute a national healthcare system where shiat like "being tested for a potentially fatal genetic illness so that you can begin preventative treatment to make sure it doesn't kill your ass" won't put you in bankruptcy court...alas, I think I shall be very lucky to see it within my lifetime
 
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