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(NASA)   Sun releases XXX flares, flashes its big ol' coronas   (nasa.gov) divider line 41
    More: Interesting, coronas, solar flares, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, CMEs, safe mode, Solar Dynamics Observatory, ejections  
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2162 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 May 2013 at 9:44 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-15 09:14:08 AM
Great.   Another Java update.
 
2013-05-15 09:19:05 AM

Diogenes: Great.   Another Java update.


HA!
 
2013-05-15 09:29:40 AM
J.J. Abrams would approve.
 
2013-05-15 09:54:55 AM
Awesome. Bring on the pole reversal now!
 
2013-05-15 09:56:08 AM
nerdreactor.com
 
2013-05-15 09:58:21 AM
After a year long hiatus It was pleasant to experience HF propagation in full swing. Picked up FO, 7X3, VK9, YI, JY & SX in the last week. C'mon Sol you can do better!

/Big ol' coronas....
 
2013-05-15 10:12:05 AM
As a coincidence, I have a case of SOL and a Case of Corona with some Limes ready for the long weekend..... ITS A SIGN!!! hehehehehehe
 
2013-05-15 10:23:22 AM

I encourage you all to go out and look at the Sun.  If you have a telescope, binoculars or a camera- put Baader Solar Film on the front of it, or learn how to build a "sunguntelescope" using a flowerpot and vinyl rear projection screen like DaTex.



Sun-In-A-Box
 
2013-05-15 10:23:55 AM
i40.tinypic.com
 
2013-05-15 10:51:56 AM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i40.tinypic.com image 850x1275]


Original?

/wait for it...
 
2013-05-15 10:55:43 AM
Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?
 
2013-05-15 11:04:30 AM

NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?


Wiki "Dalton" and "Maunder" minimums. The correlation between global climate changes and sunspot cycles has been made for centuries...but we still don't get the mechanisms involved.
 
2013-05-15 11:16:38 AM

Zik-Zak: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i40.tinypic.com image 850x1275]

Original?

/wait for it...


I am going to break the tradition, and actually provide you with the original. NSFW
 
2013-05-15 11:19:39 AM

Valiente: NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?

Wiki "Dalton" and "Maunder" minimums. The correlation between global climate changes and sunspot cycles has been made for centuries...but we still don't get the mechanisms involved.


Thank you.  It's a good start for background info.  I've always been extremely curious about the Sun and how it relates to our weather.  Here in Chicago, we get some interesting patterns.
 
2013-05-15 11:22:50 AM

NostroZ: Valiente: NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?

Wiki "Dalton" and "Maunder" minimums. The correlation between global climate changes and sunspot cycles has been made for centuries...but we still don't get the mechanisms involved.

Thank you.  It's a good start for background info.  I've always been extremely curious about the Sun and how it relates to our weather.  Here in Chicago, we get some interesting patterns.


Heh, my 7th grade science fair project was correlation between sunspots and precip.
 
2013-05-15 11:25:33 AM
I just want to know why any time we're supposed to get a good auroral display, it turns cloudy and we can't see it.
 
2013-05-15 11:46:44 AM

FrancoFile: Heh, my 7th grade science fair project was correlation between sunspots and precip.


And?

Don't just come in here, put a dunce hat on everyone, and walk out with a stench behind you...

Teach something, so putting up with your attitude is worthwhile.
 
2013-05-15 11:49:42 AM
Positive correlation in Midwest winters, with approx 3 days lag from sunspot peak to precip peak.
 
2013-05-15 12:45:47 PM

FrancoFile: Positive correlation in Midwest winters, with approx 3 days lag from sunspot peak to precip peak.


Thank you, good sir.
 
2013-05-15 01:11:02 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Zik-Zak: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i40.tinypic.com image 850x1275]

Original?

/wait for it...

I am going to break the tradition, and actually provide you with the original. NSFW


I CME
 
2013-05-15 01:13:01 PM

NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?


I agree with you that it would have an impact a couple years ago we had  3 day burst of 20 degree plus normal temps in February for the duration of the burst. However I seem to recall that these were not pointed at the earth in this case.
 
2013-05-15 01:23:39 PM

Luminiferous Aether: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Zik-Zak: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i40.tinypic.com image 850x1275]

Original?

/wait for it...

I am going to break the tradition, and actually provide you with the original. NSFW

I CME


lawl
 
2013-05-15 01:29:00 PM
I hate it when its an open joke to some, but not all :P
 
2013-05-15 01:36:58 PM

onzmadi: NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?

I agree with you that it would have an impact a couple years ago we had  3 day burst of 20 degree plus normal temps in February for the duration of the burst. However I seem to recall that these were not pointed at the earth in this case.


Yeah, just ion toasted the top of the atmosphere on the daylight side of the planet. Been waiting to see some X class flares for months.
 
2013-05-15 01:53:15 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Zik-Zak: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i40.tinypic.com image 850x1275]

Original?

/wait for it...

I am going to break the tradition, and actually provide you with the original. NSFW


I didn't expect the breaking of tradition.

/NO ONE EXPECTS, etc.
 
2013-05-15 02:41:07 PM

NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?


There is a connection between solar activity and climate, but I know of no way that it could cause an immediate change like that.  For how long has that heat wave predicted?  The sun dumping that much heat into the atmosphere would cause some major weather disruptions beyond just local warming.  I'd guess it's just a weird coincidence, not a causal thing, particularly if it's a warm front moving through the area.
 
2013-05-15 02:47:29 PM
Anyone know if these flares were associated with CMEs?  And how long it would take for aurora to peak after these flares?  I'm going backpacking for the next few days, and I'm curious what my odds of seeing anything are.

/never seen the aurora
 
2013-05-15 03:05:16 PM

NostroZ: Valiente: NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?

Wiki "Dalton" and "Maunder" minimums. The correlation between global climate changes and sunspot cycles has been made for centuries...but we still don't get the mechanisms involved.

Thank you.  It's a good start for background info.  I've always been extremely curious about the Sun and how it relates to our weather.  Here in Chicago, we get some interesting patterns.


The other link I'd like to look at is the Iceland volcano (Eyeofayokel is the only way I remember it). That sucker put out an amazing amount of ash, and we've noticed a small reversal in the overall global warming trend, which seems to have resumed itself with a vengence this year. How long does it take the ash in the upper atmo to settle? I think I remember hearing something like 18 months? I'm in Los Angeles and started a garden this year, and it's turning out to be a challenging year.

/bonus was the windy season that dried everything out, then the 90 degree weather, but 50% humidity. Advanced garden watering skill achieved!
 
2013-05-15 03:06:49 PM

BigLuca: Luminiferous Aether: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Zik-Zak: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i40.tinypic.com image 850x1275]

Original?

/wait for it...

I am going to break the tradition, and actually provide you with the original. NSFW

I CME

lawl


Me too.

/thank you for the fapping material. The vibe is gonna need new batteries soon.
 
2013-05-15 04:10:00 PM

Luminiferous Aether: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Zik-Zak: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [i40.tinypic.com image 850x1275]

Original?

/wait for it...

I am going to break the tradition, and actually provide you with the original. NSFW

I CME


Nice.  I cme to post the sme thing

i1003.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-15 05:18:33 PM

onzmadi: NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?

I agree with you that it would have an impact a couple years ago we had  3 day burst of 20 degree plus normal temps in February for the duration of the burst. However I seem to recall that these were not pointed at the earth in this case.


Not directly Earth pointed, but the sunspot of origin IS moving to face us, not away, so if this activity level keeps up it will be an interesting week.

I'm more curious as to why there seems to be a pattern (that really must be random) of large flares just after 00:20 Zulu. No reason for the timing to be in cycles like that, but there it is.

www.swpc.noaa.gov
 
2013-05-15 05:28:19 PM
I said Zulu .. I meant UTC. of course I did.
 
2013-05-15 06:55:57 PM
Monitors are starting to flutter again... Do I smell flare # 5 ?
 
2013-05-15 07:30:58 PM
oh, shiat. I'm a dumbass.

I finally, just how, 'got it'.

*facepalm
 
2013-05-15 07:49:13 PM
Come on 6 meters!!!
 
2013-05-15 07:51:34 PM
BTW, If a big CME hits us it will result in widespread destruction of electronics and our electrical power grid, causing life as we know it to come to a grinding halt and civilization to collapse.

Have a nice day.
 
2013-05-15 08:04:24 PM

Dion Fortune: BTW, If a big CME hits us it will result in widespread destruction of electronics and our electrical power grid, causing life as we know it to come to a grinding halt and civilization to collapse.

Have a nice day.


You forgot several other things like the orientation of the CME charge v/s the orientation of the magnetic field at the time, and many many many other factors.

Yes, a Carrington Level event will happen again, but its not like every X class flare has that potential.

/OK.. It's Midnight UTC. Lets see if we get another run.
 
2013-05-15 08:59:44 PM
Well, so much for that run of flares at 00:00 to 01:00 UTC
 
2013-05-15 09:29:15 PM

Erix: NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?

There is a connection between solar activity and climate, but I know of no way that it could cause an immediate change like that.  For how long has that heat wave predicted?  The sun dumping that much heat into the atmosphere would cause some major weather disruptions beyond just local warming.  I'd guess it's just a weird coincidence, not a causal thing, particularly if it's a warm front moving through the area.


THIS. Solar activity shouldn't affect weather (i.e., day to day changes). If it did, you would expect the entire planet to warm up quasi-uniformly from the solar flare.

/Meteorologist
//Not on TV, partially because I don't have tits
 
2013-05-15 10:27:44 PM

hershy799: Erix: NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?

There is a connection between solar activity and climate, but I know of no way that it could cause an immediate change like that.  For how long has that heat wave predicted?  The sun dumping that much heat into the atmosphere would cause some major weather disruptions beyond just local warming.  I'd guess it's just a weird coincidence, not a causal thing, particularly if it's a warm front moving through the area.

THIS. Solar activity shouldn't affect weather (i.e., day to day changes). If it did, you would expect the entire planet to warm up quasi-uniformly from the solar flare.

/Meteorologist
//Not on TV, partially because I don't have tits


I'm disappointed that, as a meteorologist, you did not deride him to the point of tears for his crack-addict science.

// The sun also weighs more than a duck, so clearly it's a witch.
 
2013-05-16 12:05:44 AM

NostroZ: Anyone else wondering about how these flares affect our weather?

Every time one of these big bad boys comes through, here in Chicago, we get a nice bump in the weather (10-20 degrees).
I calculated it out and it's about 18.5 hours that it takes an X-flare to reach Earth.  This one being a bit faster at 18.45 hrs from 9:30 Eastern 13th May comes to 4:15pm Eastern and since they are ahead by an hour it's 3:15 central.  So yesterday, we had a BIG heatwave, and it's peak was right around that time... considering this was the third flare ejection, it would explain the fast build up in weather.

Anyone care to break it down for a laymen like me?


To break it down simply, it has no effect. It must just be a coincidence, or your brain bringing positive evidence to the foreground.
 
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