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(Time)   Despite funding cutbacks, college presidents pay now averages $440,000 a year as schools show students that there actually are some good paying jobs with that college degree   (newsfeed.time.com) divider line 3
    More: Spiffy, establishments, Graham Spanier, Chronicle of Higher Education, Gordon Gee, cutbacks, financing, Mary Sue Coleman, schools  
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415 clicks; posted to Business » on 15 May 2013 at 10:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-15 11:49:11 AM
1 votes:

TheOtherGuy: To those of you saying that the figure doesn't seem particularly outrageous, let me enlighten you.

At many schools, presidents are provided with a (usually luxurious) home, one or more vehicles or a car service, full-ride insurance similar to what Congress gets (i.e., none of the BS deductibles and copays and other things peons have to deal with, and NO employee contribution even if their whole family is covered), and a very generous travel and expense account (he is supposed to travel and raise money, of course).  Oh, and all of their kids can attend for free, immediately as opposed to after a year or more that most employee's kids have to wait.

At the last school where I worked, I think the president was lucky if he had to pay for groceries in his personal fridge, and maybe clothes (hell, he probably expensed much of that).  ALL of his other bills, housing, transportation, insurance, and utilities, were all paid by the school on top of his salary, which was above the figure given in TFA.  He didn't own his own car or home, but he had no bills and a very high 6-figure salary.

And, after 7 years of this guy giving excuse after excuse about why empty positions couldn't be filled, and no raises, COLA or otherwise, could be considered, they still wondered why we have a 'morale problem'.


It's not much better in government.  My boss is a PI.  Can't be fired.  Ever.  Right now, he's trying to leverage his retirement date, with the explicit threat that if they close his lab, they'll be paying his salary for the rest of his life.

Meanwhile, they're inventing new positions in academia and government to avoid giving my generation tenure-track postions (not even tenure), and using postdocs and postbacs to fill staff scientist positions (to avoid having to give my generation full-time benefits.

I have to ask myself, was it really that bad to be a scientist years ago that they had to offer these contracts, or were the expectations from an employer really that high?

If you take a close look, there is little that separates the academic and government science business model from a Ponzi scheme.
2013-05-15 11:36:48 AM
1 votes:
To those of you saying that the figure doesn't seem particularly outrageous, let me enlighten you.

At many schools, presidents are provided with a (usually luxurious) home, one or more vehicles or a car service, full-ride insurance similar to what Congress gets (i.e., none of the BS deductibles and copays and other things peons have to deal with, and NO employee contribution even if their whole family is covered), and a very generous travel and expense account (he is supposed to travel and raise money, of course).  Oh, and all of their kids can attend for free, immediately as opposed to after a year or more that most employee's kids have to wait.

At the last school where I worked, I think the president was lucky if he had to pay for groceries in his personal fridge, and maybe clothes (hell, he probably expensed much of that).  ALL of his other bills, housing, transportation, insurance, and utilities, were all paid by the school on top of his salary, which was above the figure given in TFA.  He didn't own his own car or home, but he had no bills and a very high 6-figure salary.

And, after 7 years of this guy giving excuse after excuse about why empty positions couldn't be filled, and no raises, COLA or otherwise, could be considered, they still wondered why we have a 'morale problem'.
2013-05-15 10:16:12 AM
1 votes:
While I don't like that Presidents' salaries are increasing, they don't seem egregiously high. They are essentially CEO's of large corporations. I mean the guy running the University of California system which has around 10 campuses and well over 200,000 students makes less than $900k.

The real travesty:

Nothing to scoff at, though many of the presidents on the list don't make as much as the football and men's basketball coaches at their schools.
 
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