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(Forbes)   The best and worst paying jobs in America, according to Forbes, are... about what you'd expect   (forbes.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, worst paying, anesthesiologists, Asa, permanent residency, toiletries, anesthesia  
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4872 clicks; posted to Business » on 14 May 2013 at 8:44 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-05-14 08:17:18 PM  
If money is all you care about, become a porn star or prostitute.
 
2013-05-14 08:19:30 PM  
Carnies ranked hire than I expected.

Which is nice, because meth is an expensive habit.
 
2013-05-14 08:42:48 PM  
Please!!!!

Before posting slide shows, go to clusterfake and see if you can  de-slide-ify it.
 
2013-05-14 08:44:45 PM  
FTFA: Though C-level executives are infamous for what many consider to be their excessive pay, it turns out those sporting scrubs in the operating room bring in a bigger paycheck, on average, than those wearing suits in the corner office. That's according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates survey.

In operating rooms across the country, anesthesiologists, the highest-paid workers in the U.S., earn an average of $111.94 an hour, for a mean annual salary of $232,830, according to the BLS. That's about the same as they made last year - but anesthesiologists, like others in medical work, can pay well into six figures a year in medical malpractice premiums.



(*sigh*) (*winces in pain*) (*takes off glasses and rubs eyes*)

Okay... Can we cut through some bullsh*it here? It's coming from two different directions in these first two paragraphs.

First off... C-level executives make far more money than doctors do when you look at their total compensation packages. For the C-, his paycheck is usually the tip of the compensation iceberg, and Forbes knows this. This bullsh*it in the first paragraph is typical Forbes propaganda trying to play down the excessive pay that C's typically get compared to their employees. (remember the Forbes rule: "The true talent in a company is at the top, so pay them well and do everything you can to retain them. The riffraff below is completely interchangeable and thus should be paid as little as possible.")

On the other hand... Even though many doctors do pay well into six figures for their malpractice insurance, they still seem to net a fairly substantial income anyway. It's more obvious when you live in smaller areas. Doctors (and the lawyers who wind up suing them) live in the biggest houses in the best neighborhoods and drive the nicest cars, while everyone else in the area struggles to afford medical care.
 
2013-05-14 08:47:20 PM  
Well I guess "Designer of websites that don't shiat the bed when adblock is on the user's browser" isn't in the star performers eh?  Forbes?
 
2013-05-14 08:50:25 PM  
and yer right subby, as expected the highest paying is 9/10 people who fix the damage done by the produce of people who have 9/10 of the lowest paying jobs.
 
2013-05-14 08:54:12 PM  
Let's see how many types of surgeons we can include...alternatively, let's see how many minimum wage service industry people can we include.  Tag is appropriate.
 
2013-05-14 09:06:26 PM  
without looking I'm going to say major league athletes as highest and fast food workers in the lowest.
 
2013-05-14 09:13:57 PM  
This year, there's a new "Worst Job in America", displacing the old number one for the last five consecutive years - "Crack Whore".

The new number one: "Assistant Crack Whore"
 
2013-05-14 09:15:11 PM  
couldn't that have just read:

Best-paying job:
Doctor

Worst paying job:
Interchangeable retail
 
2013-05-14 09:15:55 PM  

dirtiest_sanchez: This year, there's a new "Worst Job in America", displacing the old number one for the last five consecutive years - "Crack Whore".

The new number one: "Assistant Crack Whore"


At least that pays. There's a wait list for unpaid crack whore internships right now.
 
2013-05-14 09:22:51 PM  

meyerkev: couldn't that have just read:

Best-paying job:
Doctor

Worst paying job:
Interchangeable retail


The latter is specific enough (AFA earnings, work conditions, hours and the like go) but the former entails quite a span.
 
2013-05-14 09:26:00 PM  

DrewCurtisJr: major league athletes


Depends on how you want to define that.

If you start throwing in minor sports and minor leagues and the 200th to 250th ranked PGA players etc.  it's not going to be all that big, especially if you were to use median rather than average.
 
2013-05-14 09:29:29 PM  

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: Though C-level executives are infamous for what many consider to be their excessive pay, it turns out those sporting scrubs in the operating room bring in a bigger paycheck, on average, than those wearing suits in the corner office. That's according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates survey.

In operating rooms across the country, anesthesiologists, the highest-paid workers in the U.S., earn an average of $111.94 an hour, for a mean annual salary of $232,830, according to the BLS. That's about the same as they made last year - but anesthesiologists, like others in medical work, can pay well into six figures a year in medical malpractice premiums.


(*sigh*) (*winces in pain*) (*takes off glasses and rubs eyes*)

Okay... Can we cut through some bullsh*it here? It's coming from two different directions in these first two paragraphs.

First off... C-level executives make far more money than doctors do when you look at their total compensation packages. For the C-, his paycheck is usually the tip of the compensation iceberg, and Forbes knows this. This bullsh*it in the first paragraph is typical Forbes propaganda trying to play down the excessive pay that C's typically get compared to their employees. (remember the Forbes rule: "The true talent in a company is at the top, so pay them well and do everything you can to retain them. The riffraff below is completely interchangeable and thus should be paid as little as possible.")

On the other hand... Even though many doctors do pay well into six figures for their malpractice insurance, they still seem to net a fairly substantial income anyway. It's more obvious when you live in smaller areas. Doctors (and the lawyers who wind up suing them) live in the biggest houses in the best neighborhoods and drive the nicest cars, while everyone else in the area struggles to afford medical care.


While that's true of the C-levels at a Fortune 500 company, there are a whole lot more smaller companies around in the fly-over states where the C-level executives bring in way less than the headline-grabbing compensation that executives at big, publicly traded companies make.  That brings the average down.

Also, does an anesthesiologist really make around $230k/yr and pay "well into six figures" for their insurance?  That means the average anesthesiologist is clearing around $100k/yr?  I'd guess more...
 
2013-05-14 09:36:36 PM  
Forbes is the new Newsweek of magazines.
 
2013-05-14 09:37:11 PM  

Parkanzky: Also, does an anesthesiologist really make around $230k/yr and pay "well into six figures" for their insurance?  That means the average anesthesiologist is clearing around $100k/yr?  I'd guess more...


Mind you, if you're "making" $230K, you're probably losing about a third of that to taxes or "things I do to lower my taxes".  So if you're clearing $150K, blowing $100K on insurance, and you've got $2-300K in student loans, you're doing alright, but not good enough to convince me to spend a decade working my way up through med school/internship/residency, especially compared to where I could be with a decade of experience plus single degree plus only $20-30K in student loans in a lot of other fields.

/Of course, this is Forbes, so it's not that bad.  They're just playing to their audience.
 
2013-05-14 09:38:07 PM  

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: Though C-level executives are infamous for what many consider to be their excessive pay, it turns out those sporting scrubs in the operating room bring in a bigger paycheck, on average, than those wearing suits in the corner office. That's according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates survey.

In operating rooms across the country, anesthesiologists, the highest-paid workers in the U.S., earn an average of $111.94 an hour, for a mean annual salary of $232,830, according to the BLS. That's about the same as they made last year - but anesthesiologists, like others in medical work, can pay well into six figures a year in medical malpractice premiums.


(*sigh*) (*winces in pain*) (*takes off glasses and rubs eyes*)

Okay... Can we cut through some bullsh*it here? It's coming from two different directions in these first two paragraphs.

First off... C-level executives make far more money than doctors do when you look at their total compensation packages. For the C-, his paycheck is usually the tip of the compensation iceberg, and Forbes knows this. This bullsh*it in the first paragraph is typical Forbes propaganda trying to play down the excessive pay that C's typically get compared to their employees. (remember the Forbes rule: "The true talent in a company is at the top, so pay them well and do everything you can to retain them. The riffraff below is completely interchangeable and thus should be paid as little as possible.")

On the other hand... Even though many doctors do pay well into six figures for their malpractice insurance, they still seem to net a fairly substantial income anyway. It's more obvious when you live in smaller areas. Doctors (and the lawyers who wind up suing them) live in the biggest houses in the best neighborhoods and drive the nicest cars, while everyone else in the area struggles to afford medical care.


Pretty much this:  Forbes is propaganda to push the idea that the economy really does trickle down.

Not to mention all of these 'best paying jobs' articles are bullshiat to begin with.  They're designed to either push more people into a certain field to bring down wages (eager newbies with a lot of undischargeable debt?  Bye, more experienced and better paid workers!) for the Rich.
 
2013-05-14 09:42:54 PM  

meyerkev: Mind you, if you're "making" $230K, you're probably losing about a third of that to taxes or "things I do to lower my taxes". So if you're clearing $150K, blowing $100K on insurance, and you've got $2-300K in student loans, you're doing alright, but not good enough to convince me to spend a decade working my way up through med school/internship/residency, especially compared to where I could be with a decade of experience plus single degree plus only $20-30K in student loans in a lot of other fields.

/Of course, this is Forbes, so it's not that bad. They're just playing to their audience.


Does the doctor pay the malpractice insurance in all cases, though, or do hospitals and larger clinics provide for that?
 
2013-05-14 09:49:42 PM  

Somaticasual: meyerkev: Mind you, if you're "making" $230K, you're probably losing about a third of that to taxes or "things I do to lower my taxes". So if you're clearing $150K, blowing $100K on insurance, and you've got $2-300K in student loans, you're doing alright, but not good enough to convince me to spend a decade working my way up through med school/internship/residency, especially compared to where I could be with a decade of experience plus single degree plus only $20-30K in student loans in a lot of other fields.

/Of course, this is Forbes, so it's not that bad. They're just playing to their audience.

Does the doctor pay the malpractice insurance in all cases, though, or do hospitals and larger clinics provide for that?


If you are employed by a hospital, then you usually have your malpractice paid for.  But you'll make a little less.  But you'll have better hours, so it's a trade-off.  That being said, the average anesthesiologist makes way more than 230k.
 
2013-05-14 09:51:03 PM  

Somaticasual: meyerkev: Mind you, if you're "making" $230K, you're probably losing about a third of that to taxes or "things I do to lower my taxes". So if you're clearing $150K, blowing $100K on insurance, and you've got $2-300K in student loans, you're doing alright, but not good enough to convince me to spend a decade working my way up through med school/internship/residency, especially compared to where I could be with a decade of experience plus single degree plus only $20-30K in student loans in a lot of other fields.

/Of course, this is Forbes, so it's not that bad. They're just playing to their audience.

Does the doctor pay the malpractice insurance in all cases, though, or do hospitals and larger clinics provide for that?


Dunno.

I'd imagine that when something like that is OVER HALF your salary, you'd end up with something like:

Well, you can make $300K or you can make $120K and we can pay your malpractice (because at that point, you're earning $180K to make $100K.  Marginal tax rates suck when it comes to big ticket items like that).

/AKA: Congratulations, your rent doubled and the money you made to make rent tripled.
 
2013-05-14 09:53:29 PM  

BigLuca: If you are employed by a hospital, then you usually have your malpractice paid for.  But you'll make a little less.  But you'll have better hours, so it's a trade-off.  That being said, the average anesthesiologist makes way more than 230k.


Thank you, Big Luca.
 
2013-05-14 09:56:37 PM  

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: Though C-level executives are infamous for what many consider to be their excessive pay, it turns out those sporting scrubs in the operating room bring in a bigger paycheck, on average, than those wearing suits in the corner office. That's according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates survey.

In operating rooms across the country, anesthesiologists, the highest-paid workers in the U.S., earn an average of $111.94 an hour, for a mean annual salary of $232,830, according to the BLS. That's about the same as they made last year - but anesthesiologists, like others in medical work, can pay well into six figures a year in medical malpractice premiums.


(*sigh*) (*winces in pain*) (*takes off glasses and rubs eyes*)

Okay... Can we cut through some bullsh*it here? It's coming from two different directions in these first two paragraphs.

First off... C-level executives make far more money than doctors do when you look at their total compensation packages. For the C-, his paycheck is usually the tip of the compensation iceberg, and Forbes knows this. This bullsh*it in the first paragraph is typical Forbes propaganda trying to play down the excessive pay that C's typically get compared to their employees. (remember the Forbes rule: "The true talent in a company is at the top, so pay them well and do everything you can to retain them. The riffraff below is completely interchangeable and thus should be paid as little as possible.")

On the other hand... Even though many doctors do pay well into six figures for their malpractice insurance, they still seem to net a fairly substantial income anyway. It's more obvious when you live in smaller areas. Doctors (and the lawyers who wind up suing them) live in the biggest houses in the best neighborhoods and drive the nicest cars, while everyone else in the area struggles to afford medical care.


99% ish of the total number of businesses in the US are small businesses.  Trust me, the average business owner (i.e. CEO) of your local coffee shop or grocery store is not bringing in the big bucks and doesn't have other compensation packages.  Fortune 500 is exactly what it sounds like, 500 large businesses while there are over 37 million small businesses in the US.
 
2013-05-14 09:58:54 PM  

meyerkev: BigLuca: If you are employed by a hospital, then you usually have your malpractice paid for.  But you'll make a little less.  But you'll have better hours, so it's a trade-off.  That being said, the average anesthesiologist makes way more than 230k.

Thank you, Big Luca.


Seconded
 
2013-05-14 10:11:54 PM  

Somaticasual: meyerkev: BigLuca: If you are employed by a hospital, then you usually have your malpractice paid for.  But you'll make a little less.  But you'll have better hours, so it's a trade-off.  That being said, the average anesthesiologist makes way more than 230k.

Thank you, Big Luca.

Seconded


In case you guys wondering, average malpractice for an anesthesiologist appears to be around 25k, and average salary is around 419k (according to 2010 MGMA Physician Compensation Survey).
 
2013-05-14 10:12:23 PM  

MrPleasant: 99% ish of the total number of businesses in the US are small businesses. Trust me, the average business owner (i.e. CEO) of your local coffee shop or grocery store is not bringing in the big bucks and doesn't have other compensation packages. Fortune 500 is exactly what it sounds like, 500 large businesses while there are over 37 million small businesses in the US.


I wouldn't go 99%ish, but it's definitely the majority.  There's no exact definition for small business in American law and you have to watch out to how they're being defined by whatever study/survey you're looking at.  There are plenty of businesses with several hundred or even more employees getting small business benefits and counted in right wing think tank propaganda (like every single S corp).  But of course even though they aren't small by my definition anyway, even a CEO of a 300 employee company isn't bringing in close to what a Fortune 500 guy is.
 
2013-05-14 10:22:22 PM  
Interestingly, in socialized-medicine Canada, our anesthesiologists and other specialists (at least the ones I know) make nearly double the reported average in the US after residency is completed. Also, the tuition to get there is a tiny a fraction of what the US counterparts pay.
 
2013-05-14 10:25:03 PM  
Wow, you mean to say an individual can make more money if they're highly educated and trained as opposed to only having a high school education?  Color me shocked.
 
2013-05-14 10:29:15 PM  

BumpInTheNight: and yer right subby, as expected the highest paying is 9/10 people who fix the damage done by the produce of people who have 9/10 of the lowest paying jobs.


Particularly astute observation.

I'm impressed.
 
2013-05-14 10:34:53 PM  
what if you offer shampooing alongside your anesthesiology? wake up from surgery with full-bodied bounce. how would that chart?
 
2013-05-14 10:36:19 PM  

BigLuca: Somaticasual: meyerkev: BigLuca: If you are employed by a hospital, then you usually have your malpractice paid for.  But you'll make a little less.  But you'll have better hours, so it's a trade-off.  That being said, the average anesthesiologist makes way more than 230k.

Thank you, Big Luca.

Seconded

In case you guys wondering, average malpractice for an anesthesiologist appears to be around 25k, and average salary is around 419k (according to 2010 MGMA Physician Compensation Survey).


This seems correct to me.  And I think that most anesthesiologists work as part of a medical group (operating rooms a simply stuffed full of jackasses with MDs), so the malpractice is typically bundled as a group cost.

/Dad's an anesthesiologist
//Money hasn't been a real issue since he passed his boards
 
2013-05-14 10:53:33 PM  

evilmousse: what if you offer shampooing alongside your anesthesiology? wake up from surgery with full-bodied bounce. how would that chart?


I like this. They spend most of the time in surgery just monitoring stuff while the surgeon is working. No reason they can't be doing a thorough scalp massage at the same time.
 
2013-05-14 11:21:30 PM  
As a part time minimum wage unloader at Wal-Mart, I'm getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2013-05-15 01:41:33 AM  
I'm in the functionally-poor grade for my area (NJ). Anywhere else I'd be breaking into the middle class. Living at home has its perks.

/I make chips for a living
 
2013-05-15 01:49:06 AM  
I have a BA in philosophy, tended bar for many years, now work at a desk making less than I did in a nightclub or a local bar, and am therefore getting a kick...

Majoring in philosophy wasn't motivated by money, obviously. I had planned to finish law school and wanted a sound education in critical thinking. I had decent grades and would likely have been accepted at a lower-tier school.

Then I just got lazy (true and valid criticism) and kept tending bar because I wasn't motivating to do anything but travel on a motorcycle and dick away my 20s. Now, in my late 30s and in a dearth of work-related excitement, all I want to do is be a bartender again.
 
2013-05-15 01:58:43 AM  
I come to fark.com for the explicit reason of making typos.
 
2013-05-15 02:22:21 AM  

dickfreckle: I have a BA in philosophy, tended bar for many years, now work at a desk making less than I did in a nightclub or a local bar, and am therefore getting a kick...

Majoring in philosophy wasn't motivated by money, obviously. I had planned to finish law school and wanted a sound education in critical thinking. I had decent grades and would likely have been accepted at a lower-tier school.

Then I just got lazy (true and valid criticism) and kept tending bar because I wasn't motivating to do anything but travel on a motorcycle and dick away my 20s. Now, in my late 30s and in a dearth of work-related excitement, all I want to do is be a bartender again.


I did the same thing in my 20's (other than riding a motorcycle).  Degree in History...tended bar...banged waitresses...traveled...generally unproductive but I had a lot of fun.  I didn't grow up until I was 28...because I became a father (unplanned).  My first real career didn't work out (law enforcement...too depressing), and I just fell into my 2nd career (IT) which has been good to me.  Being a father kicked my motivation into overdrive.

I guess the point is if I didn't have a son (now 19 and in the Navy...I had custody from 9 on), I would have been perfectly content bartending and goofing off because the only responsibility I had was to myself.
 
2013-05-15 02:26:27 AM  

meyerkev: couldn't that have just read:

Best-paying job:
Doctor

Worst paying job:
Interchangeable retail


Seriously.  Wtf.  A useless list if all you're going to do is list doctors of one kind or another.
 
2013-05-15 02:47:54 AM  
I was a very good student in science and math in high school, and was seriously considering studying biology with the hopes of becoming a doctor. Then we had a career day where one of the guests was a heart surgeon. He told us the hardest thing about his job was having his patients die on the table, then having to speak to the families of the deceased to give them the bad news. It sounded like much more stress than I wanted to handle.

I also met privately with a dermatologist and a opthomologist and both said that while they enjoyed their jobs, they did much of the same things every day, and had to explain the same thing over and over to their patients. That sounded much too boring.

I decided to become a CPA because the earning potential was very good and if I made a mistake, I wouldn't end up killing someone.
 
2013-05-15 05:08:58 AM  
Fast food is for high school and college students. Below manager it's a starter job and everything is broken down to being doable by an idiot. That's why Warren Buffett bought DQ, he likes buying businesses that can be run by idiots because eventually it will be.

I eaves dropped on a manager interviewing a prospective fast food employee today. It was a horrible interview, so bad I think I had more eye contact with the interviewee than the manager. The manager was going through a boring ass canned speech approved by corporate that was fifteen minutes of droning.
 
2013-05-15 07:09:57 AM  

dirtiest_sanchez: This year, there's a new "Worst Job in America", displacing the old number one for the last five consecutive years - "Crack Whore".

The new number one: "Assistant Crack Whore"


Don't you mean "Assistant to the Crack Whore"?
 
2013-05-15 01:35:27 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Well I guess "Designer of websites that don't shiat the bed when adblock is on the user's browser" isn't in the star performers eh?  Forbes?


Hell no, I mean Indian programmers make what $10K a year in US dollars, if they are the top performers.
 
2013-05-15 04:15:56 PM  

wildcardjack: Fast food is for high school and college students.


Not anymore.  Median age in that industry is now 28.
 
2013-05-15 05:52:14 PM  

slayer199: dickfreckle: I have a BA in philosophy, tended bar for many years, now work at a desk making less than I did in a nightclub or a local bar, and am therefore getting a kick...

Majoring in philosophy wasn't motivated by money, obviously. I had planned to finish law school and wanted a sound education in critical thinking. I had decent grades and would likely have been accepted at a lower-tier school.

Then I just got lazy (true and valid criticism) and kept tending bar because I wasn't motivating to do anything but travel on a motorcycle and dick away my 20s. Now, in my late 30s and in a dearth of work-related excitement, all I want to do is be a bartender again.

I did the same thing in my 20's (other than riding a motorcycle).  Degree in History...tended bar...banged waitresses...traveled...generally unproductive but I had a lot of fun.  I didn't grow up until I was 28...because I became a father (unplanned).  My first real career didn't work out (law enforcement...too depressing), and I just fell into my 2nd career (IT) which has been good to me.  Being a father kicked my motivation into overdrive.

I guess the point is if I didn't have a son (now 19 and in the Navy...I had custody from 9 on), I would have been perfectly content bartending and goofing off because the only responsibility I had was to myself.


I always figured that fathering a child would reign me in. It's not that I'm a dick; I pay bills and all that. I just enjoy not having some alien with a soft skull barfing everywhere and terrorizing me for formula.

On the other hand, I do need to be put in my place. But why would would I father a child for that reason?
 
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