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(Onion AV Club)   "James Franco, how does it feel to ruin a classic William Faulkner novel?" "Soooooooooooo good"   (avclub.com) divider line 60
    More: Asinine, James Franco, William Faulkner, modernists, Allen Ginsberg, Logan Marshall-Green  
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6805 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 14 May 2013 at 10:51 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-14 08:04:15 PM  
Don't know why ain't no one made a movie of a light in august yet

merry joe christmas, indeed
 
2013-05-14 09:52:36 PM  

simplicimus: I appreciate many genres of literature. Few writers lay down the challenge, "I dare you to read this". Maybe James Joyce.


James Joyce is more "I bet you can't read this." Fun fact, Ulysses is a text based version of the Snow Crash virus.
 
2013-05-14 10:57:22 PM  

Soulcatcher: tillerman35: simplicimus: palelizard: By definition, it is impossible to ruin a Faulkner novel, as they were ruined when written.

Nailed it.

10pts.  Expect lots of troll chow.

Faulkner isn't for everyone.  It takes a level of involvement that is often beyond the ability of most readers, who would be better off sticking with the classics, like Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys mysteries.  But if you have the mental capacity to understand not only the words on the page but the time and place that is being described, Faulkner can be amazingly rewarding.  I'm not knocking the written word as pure entertainment (I have a library with thousands of pulp sci-fi paperbacks, some of the worst- and most entertaining- writing known to mankind).  I'm just saying that entertainment is only one aspect of the written word.

Reading Faulkner requires an investment of your time, attention, research, and most of all your, I don't know what to call it- soul?  Compassion?  Will to understand?  Whatever- you get out of it what you put into it.  I wouldn't recommend a steady diet of Faulkner (or any other deep literature), but for those times when you are willing to put in the work, I guarantee you it will repay your efforts a hundredfold.

When I was in HS I absolutely loathed Faulkner. A few years later I picked up A Light in August (can't remember why) and it devastated and amazed me. He is such a fierce, honest, uncompromising writer. Once you understand what he is doing and why, it's impossible to stop searching him out.


To date, the only Faulkner book I can get through is "As I Lay Dying" - which is probably why Franco is turning it into a movie.

I might try Light in August again now that I've lived in the south for about a decade.  It might have more resonance this time around.
 
2013-05-15 12:25:48 AM  
Not really seeing what the author's problem is so far, considering it's just a short and very inconclusive trailer.  But hey, I'm always for bashing movies before I've seen them, because why wait for the movie to come out to review it?
 
2013-05-15 12:51:38 AM  

Lsherm: Soulcatcher: tillerman35: simplicimus: palelizard: By definition, it is impossible to ruin a Faulkner novel, as they were ruined when written.

Nailed it.

10pts.  Expect lots of troll chow.

Faulkner isn't for everyone.  It takes a level of involvement that is often beyond the ability of most readers, who would be better off sticking with the classics, like Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys mysteries.  But if you have the mental capacity to understand not only the words on the page but the time and place that is being described, Faulkner can be amazingly rewarding.  I'm not knocking the written word as pure entertainment (I have a library with thousands of pulp sci-fi paperbacks, some of the worst- and most entertaining- writing known to mankind).  I'm just saying that entertainment is only one aspect of the written word.

Reading Faulkner requires an investment of your time, attention, research, and most of all your, I don't know what to call it- soul?  Compassion?  Will to understand?  Whatever- you get out of it what you put into it.  I wouldn't recommend a steady diet of Faulkner (or any other deep literature), but for those times when you are willing to put in the work, I guarantee you it will repay your efforts a hundredfold.

When I was in HS I absolutely loathed Faulkner. A few years later I picked up A Light in August (can't remember why) and it devastated and amazed me. He is such a fierce, honest, uncompromising writer. Once you understand what he is doing and why, it's impossible to stop searching him out.

To date, the only Faulkner book I can get through is "As I Lay Dying" - which is probably why Franco is turning it into a movie.

I might try Light in August again now that I've lived in the south for about a decade.  It might have more resonance this time around.


Take a shot at Go Down Moses.  But do this: read it out loud.  I know that sounds crazy, and it will take you a freaking long time.  But Faulkner is spoken word written on paper.  The cadences, intonations, patois, and even the even accents of the time and setting come through.  It might as well be blank verse.  Reading it out loud forces you to become the voice of the narrator (I try my best to do it in a Southern gentleman's accent, but I suspect I just sound like Foghorn Leghorn).  It makes you BE the characters that are speaking instead of just reading about what they say.  There's really no better way to experience Faulkner.
 
2013-05-15 12:51:39 AM  

gunga galunga: I wouldn't mind this overplayed meme if they at least got it right.

Or is the point that they're intentionally getting it wrong? Like when people act as if it was Anne Frank who was the one who had to hide in the attic for three years.


This.  How f*cking hard can it be to look up the offending clip of him saying it in the movie on youtube?  All he says is, "So good."  There is literally zero f*cking emphasis or tone in the line.
 
2013-05-15 02:49:37 AM  
Franco is making The Bridges of Yoknapatawpha County?
 
2013-05-15 03:12:30 AM  
Butthurt.
 
2013-05-15 07:02:19 AM  

burndtdan: Just like how he ruined Howl.

/Wait, he didn't, he was very good in it.


I imagine Howl wasn't filled with accents so painfully fake and dialogue so absurdly stilted that I had to shut off the video to prevent a seizure halfway through the  teaser,though.
 
2013-05-15 08:42:03 PM  

Jim_Callahan: burndtdan: Just like how he ruined Howl.

/Wait, he didn't, he was very good in it.

I imagine Howl wasn't filled with accents so painfully fake and dialogue so absurdly stilted that I had to shut off the video to prevent a seizure halfway through the  teaser,though.


Hey he worked very hard on that film.

garash.org

Oh wait.
 
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