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(USA Today)   Bangladesh honors clothing factory dead, will be made into the newest Ralph Lauren line of "Regret" polo shirts   (usatoday.com) divider line 11
    More: Sappy, Ralph Lauren, structural failure, Bangladeshi, Bangladesh, Tommy Hilfiger  
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1030 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 May 2013 at 9:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-14 08:18:20 AM
Actually, subby, if a company involved in exploiting workers at this (or any other) factory *were* to release such a line of clothing, all they'd have to do is say it's designed to raise awareness and make sure that nobody forgets what happened and make a promise to donate a certain percentage of total sales toward some vague effort to improve building codes and add building inspectors. Not, of course, to encourage any sort of unionizing or efforts by said workers to improve their actual working conditions. They'd be lauded by the media as taking responsible ownership of the problem and "socially conscious" consumers would snap the shirts up by the boatload. In fact, a really savvy company would launch some astroturf web effort, maybe through Kickstarter, to fund the production of these shirts...they could collect most of the cost from the very people who'd buy them anyway, then "discover" the effort online and offer to be the muscle that actually brings it to fruition. There would be viral videos of college-age volunteers handing out the shirts in Bangladeshi streets, lots of hugging and smiling and people realizing that they're all one, they're all part of the same effort. It would be inspiring.
 
2013-05-14 08:25:36 AM

Pocket Ninja: Actually, subby, if a company involved in exploiting workers at this (or any other) factory *were* to release such a line of clothing, all they'd have to do is say it's designed to raise awareness and make sure that nobody forgets what happened and make a promise to donate a certain percentage of total sales toward some vague effort to improve building codes and add building inspectors. Not, of course, to encourage any sort of unionizing or efforts by said workers to improve their actual working conditions. They'd be lauded by the media as taking responsible ownership of the problem and "socially conscious" consumers would snap the shirts up by the boatload. In fact, a really savvy company would launch some astroturf web effort, maybe through Kickstarter, to fund the production of these shirts...they could collect most of the cost from the very people who'd buy them anyway, then "discover" the effort online and offer to be the muscle that actually brings it to fruition. There would be viral videos of college-age volunteers handing out the shirts in Bangladeshi streets, lots of hugging and smiling and people realizing that they're all one, they're all part of the same effort. It would be inspiring.


I love it when my headlines get Ninja'd in the thread ^_^

/subby
 
2013-05-14 08:34:00 AM

Pocket Ninja: It would be inspiring.


Yes, yes it would
 
2013-05-14 09:24:00 AM
Pants at half mast.
 
2013-05-14 09:24:01 AM
I hope this thread doesn't turn into a flame war.
 
2013-05-14 09:25:03 AM
blogs.thepoconos.com
 
2013-05-14 09:43:38 AM

Pocket Ninja: Actually, subby, if a company involved in exploiting workers at this (or any other) factory *were* to release such a line of clothing, all they'd have to do is say it's designed to raise awareness and make sure that nobody forgets what happened and make a promise to donate a certain percentage of total sales toward some vague effort to improve building codes and add building inspectors. Not, of course, to encourage any sort of unionizing or efforts by said workers to improve their actual working conditions. They'd be lauded by the media as taking responsible ownership of the problem and "socially conscious" consumers would snap the shirts up by the boatload. In fact, a really savvy company would launch some astroturf web effort, maybe through Kickstarter, to fund the production of these shirts...they could collect most of the cost from the very people who'd buy them anyway, then "discover" the effort online and offer to be the muscle that actually brings it to fruition. There would be viral videos of college-age volunteers handing out the shirts in Bangladeshi streets, lots of hugging and smiling and people realizing that they're all one, they're all part of the same effort. It would be inspiring.


or make it into a commercial parody on saturday night live
 
2013-05-14 10:33:47 AM
1127 dead? Holeee shiat. I haven't heard anything past 200 to 300 because it was old news and some DUI of some famous twunt was getting more press coverage than some thousand dead near slaves that supply our cheap clothing.

/and not at all surprised that walmart has not joined the pact.
 
2013-05-14 10:37:47 AM
Assume it's true that the garmet workers earn only 38 dollars a month, or about 1.25 a day, and they sew 100 garments a day.  So, labor cost for sewing is about 1.25 cents per garment.

Why does a Gap tee-shirt cost 40 dollars?
 
2013-05-14 12:54:56 PM
"Who are you wearing?"
 
2013-05-14 10:24:54 PM
"...thirty- nineyards ofbest three-ply carpeting "
 
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