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(BBC)   Ten questions on grammar that may sort the Fark Grammar Nazis from the wannabes   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 172
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12043 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 May 2013 at 7:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-14 06:20:11 AM
6/10- that evidently makes me a grammar guru
 
2013-05-14 06:45:57 AM
1/2 and then I got bored.
 
2013-05-14 07:10:12 AM
Alright guys, their ain't no reason your not gonna have alot of fun doing this. Its rediculously easy. Its even funner than those grammer thing's they do on Facebook.
 
2013-05-14 07:23:36 AM

whistleridge: Alright guys, their ain't no reason your not gonna have alot of fun doing this. Its rediculously easy. Its even funner than those grammer thing's they do on Facebook.


fingernails. chalkboard.
 
2013-05-14 07:26:49 AM
6/10.  I believe that places me within the Grammar Hitler Jugend.
 
2013-05-14 07:28:09 AM
8/10 and a bit disappointed
 
2013-05-14 07:28:37 AM

whistleridge: Alright guys, their ain't no reason your not gonna have alot of fun doing this. Its rediculously easy. Its even funner than those grammer thing's they do on Facebook.


Ya butt irregardless its kinda innerestingly different than the every day stuff u see sumtimes.
 
2013-05-14 07:28:47 AM
Ten questions on grammer that may sort out the Fark Grammer Nazi's from the wannabe's

FTFY Subby
 
2013-05-14 07:30:52 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-14 07:31:28 AM
I missed one, therefore I quit. I can only Nazi if I can be perfect.
 
2013-05-14 07:33:01 AM
9/10. I don't care if Hilary is a man or woman.
 
GBB [TotalFark]
2013-05-14 07:33:07 AM

whistleridge: Alright guys, their ain't no reason your not gonna have alot of fun doing this. Its rediculously easy. Its even funner than those grammer thing's they do on Facebook.


You shouldn't half to try so hard.
 
2013-05-14 07:33:36 AM
If you don't score at least 80% like me, than your an moran.
 
2013-05-14 07:33:39 AM

YoOjo: Ten question's on grammer that might sort out the Fark Grammer Nazi's from the wannabe's


FTFYoOjo
 
2013-05-14 07:34:59 AM
It should read "...might sort...", actually.

//pet peeve
 
2013-05-14 07:37:05 AM
9/10. Thanks, Hilary.
 
PRS
2013-05-14 07:37:05 AM
4/10. Then again, English is only my third language.
 
2013-05-14 07:37:40 AM
6/10...but I completely guessed two of those correct answers.

*hangs head in shame*
 
2013-05-14 07:37:53 AM
7/10. Who names their son Hilary?  Misplaced modifier and gerund, you can suck it also.
 
2013-05-14 07:38:05 AM
I started, missed one then went to make a sammich.

2/4
 
2013-05-14 07:38:22 AM
8/10 and it should have been at least 9 but I'm half awake.

/eats shoots and leaves
 
2013-05-14 07:40:04 AM
Got 8/10. Missed questions 2&3, neither of which I knew.
 
2013-05-14 07:41:20 AM
10/10, but I only knew Hilary's gender because I've seen that question before, and I still don't get how the answer makes any sense.
 
2013-05-14 07:42:12 AM
8/10 - I'm apparently quite good at guessing.
 
2013-05-14 07:46:09 AM
Could "I was sat in a chair" be grammatical if the form  of 'sitting' is the transitive one?
Eg:
(An adult talking about a time he was 3 years old)
"At the cottage, my parents had a choice of how to seat us three kids. There was an orange chair, a blue chair, a stool, and a bench. Sister got the bench. Big brother was forced to takethe stool. As for me, I was sat on a chair, the blue one".
Or should it be  "I was seated"?
 
2013-05-14 07:46:19 AM

texmeth: 7/10. Who names their son Hilary?  Misplaced modifier and gerund, you can suck it also.


People who name their other boys Lindsay, Tracy, and Vivian, i.e. 19th century colonialists in safari dress.

9/10
 
2013-05-14 07:46:26 AM

mesmer242: 9/10. I don't care if Hilary is a man or woman.


I had the same score and it appears I missed the same question. I suspect Hilary is some freakish British hermaphrodite, some hideous Glen or Glennda drinking tea and wearing a tail-coat on one half and a frilly gown on the other. Revolting.
 
2013-05-14 07:46:41 AM

lammy: 8/10 and a bit disappointed


Same here
 
2013-05-14 07:47:10 AM

Millennium: 10/10, but I only knew Hilary's gender because I've seen that question before, and I still don't get how the answer makes any sense.


Comma placement for restrictive and non-restrictive relative clauses. I've taught this material on two continents and the question is a bunch of malarkey anyway. Nobody cares about that guy's sissy brother.
 
2013-05-14 07:48:05 AM

AlanSmithee: Could "I was sat in a chair" be grammatical if the form  of 'sitting' is the transitive one?
Eg:
(An adult talking about a time he was 3 years old)
"At the cottage, my parents had a choice of how to seat us three kids. There was an orange chair, a blue chair, a stool, and a bench. Sister got the bench. Big brother was forced to takethe stool. As for me, I was sat on a chair, the blue one".
Or should it be  "I was seated"?


The correct form would be, "I was ensat upon yon chair, blue, both in hue and mood."
 
2013-05-14 07:48:27 AM
9/10 with English as a second language.
 
2013-05-14 07:49:11 AM

AngryJailhouseFistfark: AlanSmithee: Could "I was sat in a chair" be grammatical if the form  of 'sitting' is the transitive one?
Eg:
(An adult talking about a time he was 3 years old)
"At the cottage, my parents had a choice of how to seat us three kids. There was an orange chair, a blue chair, a stool, and a bench. Sister got the bench. Big brother was forced to takethe stool. As for me, I was sat on a chair, the blue one".
Or should it be  "I was seated"?

The correct form would be, "I was ensat upon yon chair, blue, both in hue and mood."


OH MOTHERfarkINGshiatASSGODDAMMIT!!! I screwed that up. Should be: "I was ensat upon yon chair, blue, both in hue and humour."
 
2013-05-14 07:50:00 AM
Hilary Putman:

Hupload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-05-14 07:50:10 AM

Millennium: 10/10, but I only knew Hilary's gender because I've seen that question before, and I still don't get how the answer makes any sense.


It implies there is another brother who does live in Madrid.
 
2013-05-14 07:50:36 AM
Of course, there are no rules for English.  Everything that follows is debatable.

Which is why arguing about grammar is stupid.  Grammar is supposed to describe how language is used by a group of people, if they start using it differently, the "rules" of grammar change.
 
2013-05-14 07:50:58 AM
Most of them had no punctuation at the end of the sentences, so most were incorrect.
 
2013-05-14 07:55:38 AM
I don't see what's so hard to understand about "my brother who doesn't" meaning there's another brother who does.
 
2013-05-14 07:56:03 AM
11/10. I awarded myself a point of extra credit for noting how many words were misspelled with an extra u in them.
 
2013-05-14 07:56:06 AM
6 I gotted right.


/ Him: "Where you at?"
// Her: "Don't end a sentence with a preposition."
/// Him: "Where you at, biatch?"
 
2013-05-14 07:56:12 AM

Millennium: 10/10, but I only knew Hilary's gender because I've seen that question before, and I still don't get how the answer makes any sense.


"my brother who doesn't" implies a brother who does
"my brother, who doesn't" doesn't

obvious when spoken
 
2013-05-14 07:58:27 AM

manimal2878: Grammar is supposed to describe how language is used by a group of people, if they start using it differently, the "rules" of grammar change.


This is why we need grammar Nazis to round up those deviants who refuse to obey the current rules, and to stuff them into ovens and burn them.
 
2013-05-14 07:59:33 AM

mesmer242: 9/10. I don't care if Hilary is a man or woman.


Ditto.
 
2013-05-14 07:59:54 AM

grokca: Most of them had no punctuation at the end of the sentences, so most were incorrect.


Oh look, we've got an Obersturmbannführer in the thread.
 
2013-05-14 07:59:59 AM

manimal2878: Of course, there are no rules for English.  Everything that follows is debatable.

Which is why arguing about grammar is stupid.  Grammar is supposed to describe how language is used by a group of people, if they start using it differently, the "rules" of grammar change.


It doesn't work that way for all languages, some become quite incomprehensible if you get your grammars wrong. English has a ridiculously flexible structure in comparison to most languages, which makes it easy to learn. As a result of that, it absorbs words from other languages very easily, which means the spelling of various sounds is wildly inconsistent, making it hard to learn. As a result of that absorption, it also has about twice the vocabulary of most languages, giving it shades of meaning a lot of languages find it hard to express. Not many make the distinction between house and home, for example.
The lack of flexibility in pronunciation or structure is also why Chinese will never become the dominant global language. Pronounce it badly, and innocent phrases like, "grass mud horse" turn into, "fark your mother". That is an actual example, which is why, as a result of the Chinese blogosphere, you can buy plush grass mud horses.
 
2013-05-14 08:00:03 AM
8/10. Missed Hilary and the Churchill quote. I've heard the Chuchill story before and the source said it was his protest against a prohibition on split infinitives.
 
2013-05-14 08:00:53 AM
9/10, fark you Hilary.
 
2013-05-14 08:01:36 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

doesn't live in Madrid
 
2013-05-14 08:10:06 AM
I'm barely awake, but where (other than in the answer key) does it say that a singular neighbor owns the garden?
 
2013-05-14 08:13:57 AM

Millennium: 10/10, but I only knew Hilary's gender because I've seen that question before, and I still don't get how the answer makes any sense.


Same score with the exact same reason and level of understanding.
 
2013-05-14 08:16:51 AM

propasaurus: I'm barely awake, but where (other than in the answer key) does it say that a singular neighbor owns the garden?


Yeah, I agree. Poorly worded.
 
2013-05-14 08:18:02 AM
9/10. I missed the Hilary question too. I understood the explanation, but I rolled my eyes at it. I'd rewrite a sentence before I'd rely on such a hyperfine grammar rule to convey that meaning.

I was impressed that this site showed you the entire quiz, just with no scoring, when scripts were disabled. Most sites would have just failed to work at all until scripts were enabled.
 
2013-05-14 08:22:19 AM
8/10. Stupid Hilary.
 
2013-05-14 08:25:43 AM
9/10, but I got the Hilary question. Because while the whole test was not a repeat, that stupid farking question was.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:23 AM
8/10

Stupid Hilary, and the one with words of which I'd never heard.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:30 AM
7/10 - Hilary, whose, and I abstained from #8.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:40 AM
10/10. I learned my lesson about Hillary from the past quiz.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:49 AM
10/10

The answer key was a pain in the butt though because it didn't always give the numerical choice before the explanation. I kept having to cross check.

Now, where do I claim my prize?
 
2013-05-14 08:37:16 AM
Add me to the "9/10, shut up, Hilary" list.
 
2013-05-14 08:40:28 AM
8/10. Still confused by might/may. Missed the comma that gave away Hilary's gender.
 
2013-05-14 08:41:14 AM
8/10

Had no clue what Gerund was...
 
2013-05-14 08:41:34 AM
4/10
.... bearily awake...
 
2013-05-14 08:44:25 AM

AlanSmithee: Could "I was sat in a chair" be grammatical if the form  of 'sitting' is the transitive one?
Eg:
(An adult talking about a time he was 3 years old)
"At the cottage, my parents had a choice of how to seat us three kids. There was an orange chair, a blue chair, a stool, and a bench. Sister got the bench. Big brother was forced to takethe stool. As for me, I was sat on a chair, the blue one".
Or should it be  "I was seated"?


That one got me too. Same reasoning.
 
2013-05-14 08:44:45 AM
6/10 but that's because two of the questions ask about actual grammatical terms. I got booted from school too early to learn the fancy high fallutin' names for stuff. Basically those questions should not be on a general grammar test because people can have good grammar without knowing what "dangling poopsicle" and "geridung" means.

The wording of the Churchill question is more a historical one even though they give you a hint (I got that one right). Again, however, it requires a bit of knowledge of grammatical terms.

The Zimbabwe/landing a plane one messed me up because the plane landing phrase seems like it would be better off with a period (two phrases... or perhaps parentheses like this) than a semi colon and then it goes on to say the Zimbawe one works with a colon. Just a bad, sneaky question (yes I got it wrong).

The Hilary is male one is just weird/obscure but I'll admit that a true grammar Nazi would probably have gotten it. It is however a very awkward way of conveying the message which pretty much goes against the basic purpose of proper grammar.

In other words... I just woke up  and that test hurt my bum. I hate you all.

*fart*
 
2013-05-14 08:46:42 AM

whistleridge: Alright guys, their ain't no reason your not gonna have alot of fun doing this. Its rediculously easy. Its even funner than those grammer thing's they do on Facebook.


Oh definately.
 
2013-05-14 08:49:33 AM
10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.
 
2013-05-14 08:51:29 AM

ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.


And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.
 
2013-05-14 08:53:28 AM

PRS: 4/10. Then again, English is only my third language.


Cue Monty Python insult...

phlegm!
 
2013-05-14 08:53:53 AM
8/10.  We should get some type of recognition beside our user name. Perhaps the Fark squirrel nuts could become known as the "Dangling Participles".  That would also be a good name for a rock band.
 
2013-05-14 08:54:14 AM
English grammar.  The worst.
 
2013-05-14 09:01:56 AM
I is a grammar guru but I didn't get all of them I'd of gotten more if I knew what a gerund was
 
2013-05-14 09:02:37 AM

here to help: ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.

And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.


Better than your mother's miffled hought.

/amidoinitright?
 
2013-05-14 09:08:24 AM

ginandbacon: here to help: ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.

And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.

Better than your mother's miffled hought.

/amidoinitright?


Why, how dare you?! MY MOTHER IS A SAINT!

A sexy sexy saint.
 
2013-05-14 09:11:46 AM
Seems all is covered:

- Churchill question is history
- How do you know I only have one "neighbour"? (I actually got this one right because it would have been kinda awkward with multiple neighbors and it surely could have been phrased better)
- I would simply slap a biatch for saying "I've already told you" on the Hilary question
- It's too early for me to remember what the 3rd wrong one was....

7/10
 
2013-05-14 09:13:09 AM
7/10. Thwarted by may/might, a gerund, and that blasted Hilary. But I'm okay with being a borderline guru, inasmuch as we are dealing with UK English here.
 
2013-05-14 09:15:11 AM
The "Hilary" question has no correct answer. Here's the sentence:

"I'd like to introduce you to my sister Clara, who lives in Madrid, to Benedict, my brother who doesn't, and to my only other sibling, Hilary."

With only one other sibling, if Hilary is a sister, there should be a comma after "brother". If Hilary is a brother, there should be a comma after "sister".

As written, the speaker has at least one more sister, at least one brother who lives in Madrid, and yet only one other sibling.
 
2013-05-14 09:16:13 AM
10/10. Hilary was easy.

I had the same English teacher for three years in Junior High. He loved to diagram sentences. Loved it. Three years of diagramming sentences. I used to diagram sentences in my sleep. He was a jerk, but now I no how too rite gud.

Reading constantly helped, too.
 
2013-05-14 09:18:27 AM

here to help: ginandbacon: here to help: ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.

And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.

Better than your mother's miffled hought.

/amidoinitright?

Why, how dare you?! MY MOTHER IS A SAINT!

A sexy sexy saint.


LOL my mam's pretty cute :)
 
2013-05-14 09:18:43 AM
10 out of 10.  What do I win?
 
2013-05-14 09:21:05 AM
10/10, but I admittedly guessed on the gerund thing.
 
2013-05-14 09:22:02 AM
I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?
 
2013-05-14 09:23:35 AM

FurbyGoneFubar: 9/10 with English as a second language.


Depending on how long you've studied English, and how fluent you are, one would actually expect you to do better on a quiz like this than some native speakers. When studying a second language, your focus is generally on prescriptive usage. How native speakers actually use the language is not necessarily in line with the prescriptive rules of grammar. It's only after you learn at least some rules that you learn how native speakers break them. The native speaker of a language acquires the language first, and then learns the rules.

And this is why my linguistics professor last term, whose first language is Mandarin, uses such proper English grammar.

/Thankfully, he's only a grammar nazi for example purposes.
//Interesting class.
///Slashies
 
2013-05-14 09:24:09 AM
Nearly aced it (9/10) ... I blame sloppiness and eagerness to finish over idiocy.
 
2013-05-14 09:25:30 AM
9/10
i.imgur.com
 
2013-05-14 09:27:29 AM
I pretty well object to most of those questions.  For instance the one with the apples.  I got that one wrong and it tells me that the word "fewer" should be used for things that can be counted.  Uh, I can count apples.

And that one, "I was sat in the chair"?!  Who the hell talks like that?  That makes no sense whatsoever.
 
2013-05-14 09:29:16 AM
8/10

Missed "Hilary" and "Misplaced modifier".  The Hilary one (with different names) I had gotten wrong on another quizz recently and the I actually, almost clicked "Misplaced modifier" but changed my mind and chose C instead.  Because it's always C, right?
 
2013-05-14 09:30:11 AM

Luminaro: I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?


The question said, "The man next door has a garden..." not "The people next door have a garden..."
 
2013-05-14 09:32:23 AM
7 out of 10. I may have done fewer better considering this is May but I'm satting in a chair watching my neighbor's cat and his only other pet use their dangling modifiers to soil the soil in my garden.

/why should I listen to people who stuff extra vowels into every word then don't provide the numbers to the answers.
/Be British! Obfuscate!
 
2013-05-14 09:34:00 AM
Too many errors in the quiz.

For the neighbours question the answer depends on whether or not the garden of the neighbour(s) is owned by one or more persons.

There are more siblings, according to the reasoning the answer key uses to prove there is another brother, there also is another sister, or there should've been a comma after the word sister.

Chair sitting has only correct sentences, not one incorrect, to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

Anyone who has 10/10 without noticing the actual errors in the quiz is still just a wannabe Nazi instead of a true servant of the third empire.
 
2013-05-14 09:34:14 AM
The Hilary question made me want to stab someone with a fork. I will steal the upthread image from Modified Cornstarch:

i.imgur.com
I'm also 9 of 10, despite my meandering, drunken Fark posts. One thing I don't get is why grammar nazis think that anyone cares to meticulously proofread before posting. It's a website where we tell dick and fart jokes for chrissakes. Fark all that...preview is for p*ssies. I go in dry.
 
2013-05-14 09:36:10 AM

namegoeshere: Luminaro: I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?

The question said, "The man next door has a garden..." not "The people next door have a garden..."


But if he is married or has a partner who does not garden, then it is his garden but the garden is located at the neighbors' house.

I got the question correct. But I think it's unclear whether there is one man living in the house and he tends the garden or there are two people in the house, one of which is a man who solely tends the garden.
 
2013-05-14 09:36:28 AM

I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.


That would be to be seated, not sat.
 
2013-05-14 09:38:23 AM

TheShavingofOccam123: namegoeshere: Luminaro: I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?

The question said, "The man next door has a garden..." not "The people next door have a garden..."

But if he is married or has a partner who does not garden, then it is his garden but the garden is located at the neighbors' house.

I got the question correct. But I think it's unclear whether there is one man living in the house and he tends the garden or there are two people in the house, one of which is a man who solely tends the garden.


It said neighbor's garden, not house. Either way, based on the information we were given, it was one neighbor's garden.
 
2013-05-14 09:39:14 AM
2/2, then came the stupid sibling question I remembered from the last green BBC grammar test a few weeks ago.
 
2013-05-14 09:39:21 AM
10/10... and English is only my 4th language!
 
2013-05-14 09:39:28 AM
I got way gooder towards the, end.
 
2013-05-14 09:39:48 AM
9/10 with one lucky guess and one not-so-lucky guess.
 
2013-05-14 09:41:13 AM

namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.


See my Boobies.  'Sat' has a better grammatical feel to it to me, but I wouldn't insist on it.
 
2013-05-14 09:42:30 AM

AlanSmithee: namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.

See my Boobies.  'Sat' has a better grammatical feel to it to me, but I wouldn't insist on it.


EIP.

not really
 
2013-05-14 09:43:14 AM
9/10.  A little embarrassing, but those are the breaks when parsing a sentence written in a peculiar dialect which is missing the Oxford Harvard Comma.  :)
 
2013-05-14 09:43:31 AM
I take pride in my 7 of 10. Clearly I wasn't the only one to slip on Hilary but when I saw the explanation it made sense. I should be more conscious when taking grammar tests. This is the first time in my adult life when knowing what a gerund is has proven useful.
 
2013-05-14 09:47:20 AM
(obscene gerund)   ?
 
2013-05-14 09:48:35 AM

namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.


No, to seat is a synonym, which could also be used and mean the same thing, but here to sit was used, and sat is the correct form in this case.
 
2013-05-14 09:49:30 AM
I call bullshiat on number 4.  I can count apples. I still don't see how "I eat fewer than five apples a day" is incorrect.
 
2013-05-14 09:54:30 AM
I only know two languages: English and bad English.

www.wearysloth.com
 
2013-05-14 09:57:27 AM
I can count apples, but not oranges. Of course, I shouldn't compare the two.
 
2013-05-14 09:58:07 AM

I know more than you: namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.

No, to seat is a synonym, which could also be used and mean the same thing, but here to sit was used, and sat is the correct form in this case.


No. When someone places someone else somewhere, they do not sit them, they seat them. I will seat you here. I have seated you there.

You sit. You seat someone else.
 
2013-05-14 10:01:02 AM
9/10, grammar guru.

I think I was attacked by a gerund, once.
 
2013-05-14 10:02:50 AM
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2013-05-14 10:05:38 AM
For most of you, English is at best your second language - American is your first language.  So if you scored well, it's an even better accomplishment.

9/10, but correct on Hilary question.
 
2013-05-14 10:07:41 AM
Seating someone is what waiters do.
If daddy picks you up and places you on a seat, then 'Daddy sat me on the stool' conveys that fine nuance better (to my 'grammears', anyway)
 
2013-05-14 10:16:27 AM

whistleridge: Aight guys, their ain't no reason your not gunna have ot of foon doing this. Its rediculously eesy. Its even funner than those grammier thing's they do on Facebook.


FTFY
 
2013-05-14 10:18:14 AM
My face was once seated upon.
 
2013-05-14 10:20:42 AM
9/10 - damn Hillary.

On the plus side, I actually learned something today. So I've got that going for me. Which is nice.
 
2013-05-14 10:22:30 AM

Rashnu: My face was once seated upon.


Hey, much better than my example!

So, how's your mom doing?
 
2013-05-14 10:25:22 AM
Grammar Guru with a 9 out of 10. The Hilary question farked me.
 
2013-05-14 10:31:14 AM

AlanSmithee: Rashnu: My face was once seated upon.

Hey, much better than my example!

So, how's your mom doing?


She's actually intransitive. But I hear yours loves taking objects.
 
2013-05-14 10:33:47 AM

propasaurus: I'm barely awake, but where (other than in the answer key) does it say that a singular neighbor owns the garden?


Indeed, this is coming from England and they're notorious socialists. It could be the "People's Revolutionary Garden for Bountiful Production of Glorious Foods for Strengthening the Workers."
 
2013-05-14 10:34:05 AM

KeeptheChief: I call bullshiat on number 4.  I can count apples. I still don't see how "I eat fewer than five apples a day" is incorrect.


Oops, looks like my comprehension failed me. I was supposed to pick the one that was wrong.
 
2013-05-14 10:35:31 AM

ginandbacon: here to help: ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.

And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.

Better than your mother's miffled hought.

/amidoinitright?


Haughty Milf?
 
2013-05-14 10:35:49 AM

namegoeshere: I know more than you: namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.

No, to seat is a synonym, which could also be used and mean the same thing, but here to sit was used, and sat is the correct form in this case.

No. When someone places someone else somewhere, they do not sit them, they seat them. I will seat you here. I have seated you there.

You sit. You seat someone else.


You are unaware of the meaning of the word synonym? Look it up. And while you're perusing the dictionary also lookup to sit and learn all of its meanings.

From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sit:

Definition of SIT
transitive verb
1: to cause to be seated : place on or in a seat -often used with down
4: to provide seats or seating room for

Examples of SIT
She sat the toddler in the chair.
 
2013-05-14 10:40:07 AM
1/3 and then I realized this is exactly why I don't worry about stupid grammar rules that shouldn't even exist.
 
2013-05-14 10:43:49 AM

dickfreckle: One thing I don't get is why grammar nazis think that anyone cares to meticulously proofread before posting. It's a website where we tell dick and fart jokes for chrissakes. Fark all that...preview is for p*ssies. I go in dry.


Why? I'll tell you why. It is whycause if you fail to check your work prior to posting you risk turning the dick and fart jokes into duck and fort jokes which lack the punch, the joie-du-vivre, the vibrancy and essence of all that makes us human with our understanding and appreciation of penises and flatulence. Duck jokes? Marginally humorous and as Woody Allen taught, "duck" is funnier than "chicken", just as "Buick" is more funny than "Chevrolet". It's that hard "ck", which again brings us back to "dick", naturally. And a fort joke? Perhaps if you're in the Army or if you're a small child with a penis who laughs because he's hung a sign reading, "No Gerls alowed in my Fart" over the doorway to his penis fort. But generally speaking there is little humor to be gained from a fort. Farts, on the other hand, are a universal source of amusement. Even in Vonnegut's dystopian future in which we've all evolved to resemble fur seals, farts are funny. Forts, not funny.

This, citizen, is why it matters.
 
2013-05-14 10:44:34 AM
Ain't nothin' but a thang, yo!
 
2013-05-14 10:44:45 AM
I'm American, from the south, and I still got 9/10.

(Do I get an armband?)
 
2013-05-14 10:46:38 AM

I know more than you: namegoeshere: I know more than you: namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.

No, to seat is a synonym, which could also be used and mean the same thing, but here to sit was used, and sat is the correct form in this case.

No. When someone places someone else somewhere, they do not sit them, they seat them. I will seat you here. I have seated you there.

You sit. You seat someone else.

You are unaware of the meaning of the word synonym? Look it up. And while you're perusing the dictionary also lookup to sit and learn all of its meanings.

From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sit:

Definition of SIT
transitive verb
1: to cause to be seated : place on or in a seat -often used with down
4: to provide seats or seating room for

Examples of SIT
She sat the toddler in the chair.



The example in TFA is still incorrect. "I was sat" is wrong. "I was seated" or "I was sitting" would both be correct.
 
2013-05-14 10:56:41 AM

namegoeshere: I know more than you: namegoeshere: I know more than you: namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.

No, to seat is a synonym, which could also be used and mean the same thing, but here to sit was used, and sat is the correct form in this case.

No. When someone places someone else somewhere, they do not sit them, they seat them. I will seat you here. I have seated you there.

You sit. You seat someone else.

You are unaware of the meaning of the word synonym? Look it up. And while you're perusing the dictionary also lookup to sit and learn all of its meanings.

From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sit:

Definition of SIT
transitive verb
1: to cause to be seated : place on or in a seat -often used with down
4: to provide seats or seating room for

Examples of SIT
She sat the toddler in the chair.


The example in TFA is still incorrect. "I was sat" is wrong. "I was seated" or "I was sitting" would both be correct.


Yet "I was sat down" is fine. Silly. I should be able to say "I was sat at the nicest table in the restaurant" and not "I was seated at the nicest table in the restaurant" to instantly make it clear that I mean "by the restaurant staff because I'm so rich and handsome."
 
2013-05-14 10:58:34 AM
namegoeshere:The example in TFA is still incorrect. "I was sat" is wrong. "I was seated" or "I was sitting" would both be correct.

In American usage. In British usage, to be sat is entirely correct. It's similar to the way in the US you are 'in THE hospital', but in Britain you're 'in hospital'.
 
2013-05-14 10:59:43 AM
9/10.  Because I clicked on the arrow twice and it skipped the last question.

/English is not even my fisrt language.
 
2013-05-14 11:00:44 AM
8/10

ESL here.
 
2013-05-14 11:01:32 AM

Flab: 9/10.  Because I clicked on the arrow twice and it skipped the last question.

/English is not even my fisrt language.


Awesome!
 
2013-05-14 11:02:53 AM

AngryJailhouseFistfark: AngryJailhouseFistfark: AlanSmithee: Could "I was sat in a chair" be grammatical if the form  of 'sitting' is the transitive one?
Eg:
(An adult talking about a time he was 3 years old)
"At the cottage, my parents had a choice of how to seat us three kids. There was an orange chair, a blue chair, a stool, and a bench. Sister got the bench. Big brother was forced to takethe stool. As for me, I was sat on a chair, the blue one".
Or should it be  "I was seated"?

The correct form would be, "I was ensat upon yon chair, blue, both in hue and mood."

OH MOTHERfarkINGshiatASSGODDAMMIT!!! I screwed that up. Should be: "I was ensat upon yon chair, blue, both in hue and humour."


What in the flucking shiat?

-and-

Well that escalated quickly.

-and-

WTFH?  Dafuq?  Etc.
 
2013-05-14 11:22:45 AM
Where's meow said the dog?
 
2013-05-14 11:23:30 AM
10/10, and you have to understand that the Hilary question is 1/3 grammar and 2/3 logic.
 
2013-05-14 11:23:55 AM
I was sat down by my father and given a stern lecture.

/"was sat down" not "was sat"
 
2013-05-14 11:26:45 AM
9/10.

I are goodly at Grammars.

/Oh, and fark you, Hilary.
//Gerunds FTW!
 
2013-05-14 11:31:36 AM
1/10

Thank god for Hilary!
 
2013-05-14 11:44:57 AM

mesmer242: 9/10. I don't care if Hilary is a man or woman.


Me too. Same problem with that one question. A few were ridiculously easy, most required at least a little care.
 
2013-05-14 11:47:39 AM

Luminaro: I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?


The problem started with "The man next door has a garden that is being overrun with cats. Which of the following questions is correct?".
 
2013-05-14 11:47:41 AM
H.L. Mencken LOL
 
2013-05-14 11:48:16 AM

TheShavingofOccam123: I was sat down by my father and given a stern lecture.

/"was sat down" not "was sat"


I was sat in a slatted chair by my father and now I am very scared.

/was sat, not was sat down
 
2013-05-14 11:51:35 AM
9/10.  Hilary can bite me.
 
2013-05-14 12:05:52 PM

trappedspirit: AngryJailhouseFistfark: AngryJailhouseFistfark: AlanSmithee: Could "I was sat in a chair" be grammatical if the form  of 'sitting' is the transitive one?
Eg:
(An adult talking about a time he was 3 years old)
"At the cottage, my parents had a choice of how to seat us three kids. There was an orange chair, a blue chair, a stool, and a bench. Sister got the bench. Big brother was forced to takethe stool. As for me, I was sat on a chair, the blue one".
Or should it be  "I was seated"?

The correct form would be, "I was ensat upon yon chair, blue, both in hue and mood."

OH MOTHERfarkINGshiatASSGODDAMMIT!!! I screwed that up. Should be: "I was ensat upon yon chair, blue, both in hue and humour."

What in the flucking shiat?

-and-

Well that escalated quickly.

-and-

WTFH?  Dafuq?  Etc.


You know the thing from that place? With the stuff? Sure. You know the one.
 
2013-05-14 12:26:23 PM
9/10 because I had no idea what gerunds were.
 
2013-05-14 12:28:24 PM
"The Queen arrived at the castle with the King by her side, in a dress adorned with hand-sewn embroidered dragons."

What the shiat?  Kings can't wear dresses?  This test is homophobic or something and therefore moot.
 
2013-05-14 12:34:10 PM
7/10
I got 3, 5, 8 wrong
You expect me to remember what a gerund is?
 
2013-05-14 12:57:31 PM
10 out of 10


thank you
thank you
thank you
and seig heil
 
2013-05-14 01:11:39 PM
9/10. And I disagree with the 10th.
 
2013-05-14 01:28:48 PM

croesius: Flab: 9/10.  Because I clicked on the arrow twice and it skipped the last question.

/English is not even my fisrt language.

Awesome!


Fat fingers exist in all languages.  This was a grammar test, not a syntax exam.
 
2013-05-14 01:44:52 PM

Zasteva: mesmer242: 9/10. I don't care if Hilary is a man or woman.

Me too. Same problem with that one question. A few were ridiculously easy, most required at least a little care.


algrant33: 10/10, and you have to understand that the Hilary question is 1/3 grammar and 2/3 logic.


I thought it was probably implying that Hilary was a brother, but if the writer can't be bothered enough to be clear, then I can't be bothered enough to care.

/Since this is a British test, make sure to mentally pronounce "bothered" as "bovvered"
//Glad to see this thread isn't actually full of grammar nazis
 
2013-05-14 02:04:18 PM
7/10, Meh. I got the Hilary one right.  I read these like they're bawdy sex tales. This one started of alright, with the man with a pussy problem.  The ambiguous sex hookup was fun as always. The Z-snapping uncle rocking some chicks' landing strip with his whiskers was right-on. The dude imperatively demanding a model give him so sweet gerunding was just wrong. The cross-dressing king regally finished up the tale.
 
2013-05-14 02:14:50 PM
8/10. So I'm a grammar guru.
Meh.

// I don't use a spell-checker.
 
2013-05-14 02:23:07 PM

manimal2878: Which is why arguing about grammar is stupid.  Grammar is supposed to describe how language is used by a group of people, if they start using it differently, the "rules" of grammar change.


They do, just not overnight (or even a fortnight). Forsooth, dost thou agree?

Since everyone is using "your" to mean "you are", your going to want to get rid of your "you're" from your language and your just going to use "your" for teh both of them. Right your.
 
2013-05-14 02:44:30 PM
9/10, because I don't actually know the names of any grammatical or structural terms but I got a lucky guess on gerund.

Can't believe some of you didn't know Hilary was a dude.
 
2013-05-14 02:47:20 PM
*jumps in*
What grinds my gears?
(I know..you didn't axe me.. :)
When people spell loose when they mean lose!...
OH, also add advice/advise to that for me too....
Peeps that do that make me feel stabby.
/No..not the Easter peeps.
 
2013-05-14 03:08:35 PM

I know more than you: Too many errors in the quiz.

For the neighbours question the answer depends on whether or not the garden of the neighbour(s) is owned by one or more persons.


"The man next door has a garden..."


There are more siblings, according to the reasoning the answer key uses to prove there is another brother, there also is another sister, or there should've been a comma after the word sister.


"...my only other sibling, Hilary"


Chair sitting has only correct sentences, not one incorrect, to be sat seated or set in chair means someone else placed you there.


FTFY


Anyone who has 10/10 without noticing the actual errors in the quiz is still just a wannabe Nazi instead of a true servant of the third empire.


Noch eine andere Möchtegern...
 
2013-05-14 03:21:12 PM
8/10. Add me to the "fark you, Hilary" brigade. The "might/may" distinction, however, was one I legitimately did not know.
 
2013-05-14 03:29:34 PM

Modified Cornstarch: 9/10
[i.imgur.com image 168x168]



A) Hilary is a chicks name
b) I think that rule was just made up
 
2013-05-14 04:03:17 PM

squibbits: I missed one, therefore I quit. I can only Nazi if I can be perfect.


I quit after they pushed the less-versus-fewer myth as an actual rule.  What's next?  "Don't end a sentence with a proposition?"  "Don't split an infinitive?"

Oh, and the "Hillary must be male" one was wrong, too, so overall, a nice bit of trolling.
 
2013-05-14 04:09:43 PM
I am the Grammar Fuhrer!
 
2013-05-14 04:19:55 PM
7/10

But only because #3 (Hilary) was a poorly formed sentence to begin with, and the questions about the parts of grammar are pointlessly pedantic. It's important to use grammar properly. It's not important to know the terms of grammar. Using language correctly can be learned through osmosis, without ever being "book smart" on the subject.

My mother was an english teacher. I use language and punctuation correctly, save for the occasional mistake because I learned language and punctuation correctly. But I don't have the slightest idea what a gerund is, or a participle, or any of the other terms in the last few questions of that test.

Nobody needs to know that crap to understand how to use grammar correctly.
 
2013-05-14 04:40:08 PM
I'm pretty sure that bit about the gender of the person and the comma, meaning the one and only brother, blah, blah, etc. is not an actual grammar rule, but a "style" rule used by the press. I saw a few of these in an article way back. It's hard for me to find it again since the "rule" has no name that I can think of. I'm pretty sure the article was linked here on Fark too.

Looking at a very verbose, old-fashioned and strict grammar text-book right now shows no such rule for the use of commas.
 
2013-05-14 04:59:02 PM
8/10

Don't get the amount of butthurt about the garden. The question was perfectly clear.

/Once answered a simple maths question, about the speed at which a chicken needed to cross the road to evade a car going X km/hour, twice
//Once for each unspecified driving direction
///Didn't even get bonus points
 
2013-05-14 05:02:56 PM
What does the BBC know about English?  If the first question, they couldn't even spell 'neighbor.' correctly.
 
2013-05-14 05:34:27 PM
8/10, guessed two.   Didn't understand why I was right on the rest but they sounded right.  Why yes I am from Texas.
 
2013-05-14 06:29:00 PM

100 Watt Walrus: 7/10

But only because #3 (Hilary) was a poorly formed sentence to begin with, and the questions about the parts of grammar are pointlessly pedantic. It's important to use grammar properly. It's not important to know the terms of grammar. Using language correctly can be learned through osmosis, without ever being "book smart" on the subject.

My mother was an english teacher. I use language and punctuation correctly, save for the occasional mistake, because I learned language and punctuation correctly. But I don't have the slightest idea what a gerund is, or a participle, or any of the other terms in the last few questions of that test.

Nobody needs to know that crap to understand how to use grammar correctly.


I swear, I did not do that on purpose.

/hangs head in shame
 
2013-05-14 08:58:35 PM

mesmer242: 9/10. I don't care if Hilary is a man or woman.


Same here.

/grammar guru
 
2013-05-14 10:21:49 PM
The first question is instantly debatable. I said D because I assumed there might be more than one person living in the house. After that, I lost interest.
 
2013-05-14 10:29:27 PM
9/10 (perfect)

As for the question about Hilary, the BBC is plain wrong. Hilary could be a vocative expression indicating the party who is being addressed.

/ an implication (outside formal logic) falls short of knowing (at least in my book).
// I don't believe we can determine someone's sex from the gender a sibling uses to refer to them.
/// I have only two siblings. My sister lives in Brazil. My eldest brother is travelling. My youngest brother passed away 29 years ago.
 
2013-05-15 01:37:06 AM
9/10 ... but there are so many others, I don't feel elite, or special any more.  Fark it, back to penis and fart jokes.
 
2013-05-15 01:48:51 AM
10/10. Heil?
 
2013-05-15 07:32:09 AM
9/10 meh.
 
2013-05-15 09:26:46 AM
Someone should explain to the BBC how multiple-choice questions work. If you've numbered the answers, then when you give the solutions, you can (and should) refer to the correct answer by number. Had to keep scrolling back up to check my work because they said things like "it's coffees" and I'd written down "3".

9/10. I thought the chair thing was a trick question.
 
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