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(BBC)   Ten questions on grammar that may sort the Fark Grammar Nazis from the wannabes   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 172
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12043 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 May 2013 at 7:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-14 08:18:02 AM
9/10. I missed the Hilary question too. I understood the explanation, but I rolled my eyes at it. I'd rewrite a sentence before I'd rely on such a hyperfine grammar rule to convey that meaning.

I was impressed that this site showed you the entire quiz, just with no scoring, when scripts were disabled. Most sites would have just failed to work at all until scripts were enabled.
 
2013-05-14 08:22:19 AM
8/10. Stupid Hilary.
 
2013-05-14 08:25:43 AM
9/10, but I got the Hilary question. Because while the whole test was not a repeat, that stupid farking question was.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:23 AM
8/10

Stupid Hilary, and the one with words of which I'd never heard.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:30 AM
7/10 - Hilary, whose, and I abstained from #8.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:40 AM
10/10. I learned my lesson about Hillary from the past quiz.
 
2013-05-14 08:33:49 AM
10/10

The answer key was a pain in the butt though because it didn't always give the numerical choice before the explanation. I kept having to cross check.

Now, where do I claim my prize?
 
2013-05-14 08:37:16 AM
Add me to the "9/10, shut up, Hilary" list.
 
2013-05-14 08:40:28 AM
8/10. Still confused by might/may. Missed the comma that gave away Hilary's gender.
 
2013-05-14 08:41:14 AM
8/10

Had no clue what Gerund was...
 
2013-05-14 08:41:34 AM
4/10
.... bearily awake...
 
2013-05-14 08:44:25 AM

AlanSmithee: Could "I was sat in a chair" be grammatical if the form  of 'sitting' is the transitive one?
Eg:
(An adult talking about a time he was 3 years old)
"At the cottage, my parents had a choice of how to seat us three kids. There was an orange chair, a blue chair, a stool, and a bench. Sister got the bench. Big brother was forced to takethe stool. As for me, I was sat on a chair, the blue one".
Or should it be  "I was seated"?


That one got me too. Same reasoning.
 
2013-05-14 08:44:45 AM
6/10 but that's because two of the questions ask about actual grammatical terms. I got booted from school too early to learn the fancy high fallutin' names for stuff. Basically those questions should not be on a general grammar test because people can have good grammar without knowing what "dangling poopsicle" and "geridung" means.

The wording of the Churchill question is more a historical one even though they give you a hint (I got that one right). Again, however, it requires a bit of knowledge of grammatical terms.

The Zimbabwe/landing a plane one messed me up because the plane landing phrase seems like it would be better off with a period (two phrases... or perhaps parentheses like this) than a semi colon and then it goes on to say the Zimbawe one works with a colon. Just a bad, sneaky question (yes I got it wrong).

The Hilary is male one is just weird/obscure but I'll admit that a true grammar Nazi would probably have gotten it. It is however a very awkward way of conveying the message which pretty much goes against the basic purpose of proper grammar.

In other words... I just woke up  and that test hurt my bum. I hate you all.

*fart*
 
2013-05-14 08:46:42 AM

whistleridge: Alright guys, their ain't no reason your not gonna have alot of fun doing this. Its rediculously easy. Its even funner than those grammer thing's they do on Facebook.


Oh definately.
 
2013-05-14 08:49:33 AM
10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.
 
2013-05-14 08:51:29 AM

ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.


And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.
 
2013-05-14 08:53:28 AM

PRS: 4/10. Then again, English is only my third language.


Cue Monty Python insult...

phlegm!
 
2013-05-14 08:53:53 AM
8/10.  We should get some type of recognition beside our user name. Perhaps the Fark squirrel nuts could become known as the "Dangling Participles".  That would also be a good name for a rock band.
 
2013-05-14 08:54:14 AM
English grammar.  The worst.
 
2013-05-14 09:01:56 AM
I is a grammar guru but I didn't get all of them I'd of gotten more if I knew what a gerund was
 
2013-05-14 09:02:37 AM

here to help: ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.

And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.


Better than your mother's miffled hought.

/amidoinitright?
 
2013-05-14 09:08:24 AM

ginandbacon: here to help: ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.

And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.

Better than your mother's miffled hought.

/amidoinitright?


Why, how dare you?! MY MOTHER IS A SAINT!

A sexy sexy saint.
 
2013-05-14 09:11:46 AM
Seems all is covered:

- Churchill question is history
- How do you know I only have one "neighbour"? (I actually got this one right because it would have been kinda awkward with multiple neighbors and it surely could have been phrased better)
- I would simply slap a biatch for saying "I've already told you" on the Hilary question
- It's too early for me to remember what the 3rd wrong one was....

7/10
 
2013-05-14 09:13:09 AM
7/10. Thwarted by may/might, a gerund, and that blasted Hilary. But I'm okay with being a borderline guru, inasmuch as we are dealing with UK English here.
 
2013-05-14 09:15:11 AM
The "Hilary" question has no correct answer. Here's the sentence:

"I'd like to introduce you to my sister Clara, who lives in Madrid, to Benedict, my brother who doesn't, and to my only other sibling, Hilary."

With only one other sibling, if Hilary is a sister, there should be a comma after "brother". If Hilary is a brother, there should be a comma after "sister".

As written, the speaker has at least one more sister, at least one brother who lives in Madrid, and yet only one other sibling.
 
2013-05-14 09:16:13 AM
10/10. Hilary was easy.

I had the same English teacher for three years in Junior High. He loved to diagram sentences. Loved it. Three years of diagramming sentences. I used to diagram sentences in my sleep. He was a jerk, but now I no how too rite gud.

Reading constantly helped, too.
 
2013-05-14 09:18:27 AM

here to help: ginandbacon: here to help: ginandbacon: 10 for 10. Mother was an editor at Houghton Mifflin for most of my life.

And I bet she had a "hought mifflin". Rawr.

Better than your mother's miffled hought.

/amidoinitright?

Why, how dare you?! MY MOTHER IS A SAINT!

A sexy sexy saint.


LOL my mam's pretty cute :)
 
2013-05-14 09:18:43 AM
10 out of 10.  What do I win?
 
2013-05-14 09:21:05 AM
10/10, but I admittedly guessed on the gerund thing.
 
2013-05-14 09:22:02 AM
I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?
 
2013-05-14 09:23:35 AM

FurbyGoneFubar: 9/10 with English as a second language.


Depending on how long you've studied English, and how fluent you are, one would actually expect you to do better on a quiz like this than some native speakers. When studying a second language, your focus is generally on prescriptive usage. How native speakers actually use the language is not necessarily in line with the prescriptive rules of grammar. It's only after you learn at least some rules that you learn how native speakers break them. The native speaker of a language acquires the language first, and then learns the rules.

And this is why my linguistics professor last term, whose first language is Mandarin, uses such proper English grammar.

/Thankfully, he's only a grammar nazi for example purposes.
//Interesting class.
///Slashies
 
2013-05-14 09:24:09 AM
Nearly aced it (9/10) ... I blame sloppiness and eagerness to finish over idiocy.
 
2013-05-14 09:25:30 AM
9/10
i.imgur.com
 
2013-05-14 09:27:29 AM
I pretty well object to most of those questions.  For instance the one with the apples.  I got that one wrong and it tells me that the word "fewer" should be used for things that can be counted.  Uh, I can count apples.

And that one, "I was sat in the chair"?!  Who the hell talks like that?  That makes no sense whatsoever.
 
2013-05-14 09:29:16 AM
8/10

Missed "Hilary" and "Misplaced modifier".  The Hilary one (with different names) I had gotten wrong on another quizz recently and the I actually, almost clicked "Misplaced modifier" but changed my mind and chose C instead.  Because it's always C, right?
 
2013-05-14 09:30:11 AM

Luminaro: I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?


The question said, "The man next door has a garden..." not "The people next door have a garden..."
 
2013-05-14 09:32:23 AM
7 out of 10. I may have done fewer better considering this is May but I'm satting in a chair watching my neighbor's cat and his only other pet use their dangling modifiers to soil the soil in my garden.

/why should I listen to people who stuff extra vowels into every word then don't provide the numbers to the answers.
/Be British! Obfuscate!
 
2013-05-14 09:34:00 AM
Too many errors in the quiz.

For the neighbours question the answer depends on whether or not the garden of the neighbour(s) is owned by one or more persons.

There are more siblings, according to the reasoning the answer key uses to prove there is another brother, there also is another sister, or there should've been a comma after the word sister.

Chair sitting has only correct sentences, not one incorrect, to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

Anyone who has 10/10 without noticing the actual errors in the quiz is still just a wannabe Nazi instead of a true servant of the third empire.
 
2013-05-14 09:34:14 AM
The Hilary question made me want to stab someone with a fork. I will steal the upthread image from Modified Cornstarch:

i.imgur.com
I'm also 9 of 10, despite my meandering, drunken Fark posts. One thing I don't get is why grammar nazis think that anyone cares to meticulously proofread before posting. It's a website where we tell dick and fart jokes for chrissakes. Fark all that...preview is for p*ssies. I go in dry.
 
2013-05-14 09:36:10 AM

namegoeshere: Luminaro: I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?

The question said, "The man next door has a garden..." not "The people next door have a garden..."


But if he is married or has a partner who does not garden, then it is his garden but the garden is located at the neighbors' house.

I got the question correct. But I think it's unclear whether there is one man living in the house and he tends the garden or there are two people in the house, one of which is a man who solely tends the garden.
 
2013-05-14 09:36:28 AM

I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.


That would be to be seated, not sat.
 
2013-05-14 09:38:23 AM

TheShavingofOccam123: namegoeshere: Luminaro: I got the first one wrong and it annoyed me.  They didn't actually tell you if there were one or more neighbors, so I chose the s-apostrophe.  If they mean that the garden belonged to one neighbor in particular rather than a group of neighbors as a whole, that sort of makes sense, but then what if there are multiple people living in the same house?  Are all 5 people living in that house considered "neighbor" or "neighbors"?

The question said, "The man next door has a garden..." not "The people next door have a garden..."

But if he is married or has a partner who does not garden, then it is his garden but the garden is located at the neighbors' house.

I got the question correct. But I think it's unclear whether there is one man living in the house and he tends the garden or there are two people in the house, one of which is a man who solely tends the garden.


It said neighbor's garden, not house. Either way, based on the information we were given, it was one neighbor's garden.
 
2013-05-14 09:39:14 AM
2/2, then came the stupid sibling question I remembered from the last green BBC grammar test a few weeks ago.
 
2013-05-14 09:39:21 AM
10/10... and English is only my 4th language!
 
2013-05-14 09:39:28 AM
I got way gooder towards the, end.
 
2013-05-14 09:39:48 AM
9/10 with one lucky guess and one not-so-lucky guess.
 
2013-05-14 09:41:13 AM

namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.


See my Boobies.  'Sat' has a better grammatical feel to it to me, but I wouldn't insist on it.
 
2013-05-14 09:42:30 AM

AlanSmithee: namegoeshere: I know more than you: to be sat in chair means someone else placed you there.

That would be to be seated, not sat.

See my Boobies.  'Sat' has a better grammatical feel to it to me, but I wouldn't insist on it.


EIP.

not really
 
2013-05-14 09:43:14 AM
9/10.  A little embarrassing, but those are the breaks when parsing a sentence written in a peculiar dialect which is missing the Oxford Harvard Comma.  :)
 
2013-05-14 09:43:31 AM
I take pride in my 7 of 10. Clearly I wasn't the only one to slip on Hilary but when I saw the explanation it made sense. I should be more conscious when taking grammar tests. This is the first time in my adult life when knowing what a gerund is has proven useful.
 
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