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(C|Net)   Google Drive triples their free storage to 15 Gb. Your move, Dropbox   (news.cnet.com) divider line 100
    More: Spiffy, Google Docs, Google, Dropbox, Google products, Google I/O, shot across the bow  
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2489 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 May 2013 at 4:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-13 04:25:44 PM  
While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.

/not a fan of becoming completely reliant on the cloud
 
2013-05-13 04:26:22 PM  
Oooh, yes! Your move, Dropbox! And soon!
 
2013-05-13 04:26:42 PM  
Tried to use google drive once. Got confused and went back to dropbox.
 
2013-05-13 04:27:45 PM  
Once upon a time, I would have said, "that's a lot of pr0n".

Not anymore though.  In fact that's hardly adequate.
 
2013-05-13 04:29:15 PM  
Yahoo Mail announced that Dropbox is now integrated into their service, for those of you who don't treat Yahoo like it's a leper.
 
2013-05-13 04:29:17 PM  

RoxtarRyan: While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.


Like, say, in a folder on your computer? A folder that is then synchronized to all your other devices, as well as available on the cloud, but nonetheless still exists on your device in case you have no Internet access? A folder with some easily identifiable name, like "Google Drive"?
 
2013-05-13 04:31:05 PM  
wake me up when i can fit my Steam library on it
 
2013-05-13 04:31:29 PM  

Theaetetus: RoxtarRyan: While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.

Like, say, in a folder on your computer? A folder that is then synchronized to all your other devices, as well as available on the cloud, but nonetheless still exists on your device in case you have no Internet access? A folder with some easily identifiable name, like "Google Drive"?


I'd rather name mine "Dropbox" but that's mainly out of inertia.
 
2013-05-13 04:31:46 PM  

RoxtarRyan: While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.


Well, then Dropbox and Google Drive are perfect for you, because you'll always have the local copies. All most people use them for is to sync your files across multiple devices. You always have the local version on your actual hard drive, and if that version gets corrupted or overwritten because of a change on another device you can just revert back.

Seriously, it's file sync'ing and the ability to access via the web version from any computer. It's *not* cloud-only storage.
 
2013-05-13 04:32:09 PM  

Rev.Killjoy: wake me up when i can fit my Steam library on it


Isn't the point of steam that it's a cloud service?
 
db2
2013-05-13 04:33:53 PM  
Is this the ol' Microsoft strategy? Bleed cash to buy market share, and wring it out of them later?
 
2013-05-13 04:36:20 PM  
I never had the feeling that DropBox was riffling through my files looking for ways to target spam at me though.
 
2013-05-13 04:36:25 PM  
Too late, google. You didn't have a linux client when I needed you (Still don't.), and I'm happy with Dropbox.
 
2013-05-13 04:36:39 PM  

Theaetetus: RoxtarRyan: While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.

Like, say, in a folder on your computer? A folder that is then synchronized to all your other devices, as well as available on the cloud, but nonetheless still exists on your device in case you have no Internet access? A folder with some easily identifiable name, like "Google Drive"?


I mean as in copied to an SD card on my phone or tablet, or stored on my laptop. I don't often use GD except for when I need to grab a file remotely that I forgot to get from my LAN. There is no way I'd be able to pick and choose out of the TBs of info that I have what to store and not store, so while the drive is nice to have, even setting up what folders or individual files to sync is more of a headache than it is worth. I just need to remember to copy over to what I'm bringing with me whatever files I need for the night before I leave my house.
 
2013-05-13 04:36:46 PM  
Neat, but it really comes down to there isn't much in terms of data I have that's both small enough to fit inside of 15GB and trivial enough that I wouldn't mind it when ever google employees read it/scan it/sell its metadata to the highest bidder.  And yes, they are definitely scanning the contents of anything you put there.
 
2013-05-13 04:36:54 PM  

meanmutton: I'd rather name mine "Dropbox" but that's mainly out of inertia.


We were looking for a way to sync ~1GB of files across 7-10 lab laptops for work trips. A cheap, easy solution was all we needed -- no need for any complex "enterprise" system or a more elaborate version-control and access-control type system. Just something to make sure a certain set of files were always available on every computer. Dropbox was the easiest solution. Google drive is *similar* but just didn't feel as transparent or easy to deploy as Dropbox.
 
2013-05-13 04:37:01 PM  
I got 50GB free from Box. Your move, everyone else.
 
2013-05-13 04:37:20 PM  
I got 250GB of drop box for free.  15GB?  psshhh

/never uses it.
 
2013-05-13 04:38:04 PM  

dukeblue219: Seriously, it's file sync'ing and the ability to access via the web version from any computer. It's *not* cloud-only storage.


I just like to have stuff on hand in case there is no web. The internet isn't everywhere, and sadly enough, I've been to places that don't have WiFi or 4G access to even tether my laptop.
 
2013-05-13 04:38:31 PM  

Arkanaut: In fact that's hardly adequate.


That's what she said.
 
2013-05-13 04:39:55 PM  

bob_ross: I got 250GB of drop box for free.


How?
 
2013-05-13 04:42:40 PM  
When Dropbox and SkyDrive start scanning files and mining the data contained therein, I'll worry - because, see, that's what Google Drive is doing.

db2: Is this the ol' Microsoft strategy? Bleed cash to buy market share, and wring it out of them later?


Remember the old adage, "if you're not paying anything to use a service, you're not the customer, you're the product?" That's what's happening here. Google sells data. Your files, even without having to peer into their contents, provide information Google can use - especially as you're using their service with (ta-da!) personally identifiable information you provided to Google so you could access Google Drive. Google's unified Terms of Service give them the right to examine and use your content stored on their systems, and one of those uses is to mine the files for relevant contextual data.

You'll also notice that the 15Gb is shared across Google Drive, GMail, and Google+ photos. Why mine separate locations when, in one fell swoop, they can get everything at once. Your usage data alone is valuable to them and to their partners - add to that the type of content you're likely to store, the metadata that can be scraped from your content, and selected portions of the content itself, and you're the piggy they're taking to market.
 
2013-05-13 04:42:49 PM  

czetie: Arkanaut: In fact that's hardly adequate.

That's what she said.


Tell your mother I'm sorry.
 
2013-05-13 04:42:52 PM  
maybe 2.5GB, but probably not 250GB...
 
2013-05-13 04:43:55 PM  
So I guess at this point it's a competition to see which company I'd rather have looking at my gay midget donkey fisting porn...
 
2013-05-13 04:44:58 PM  

SpdrJay: So I guess at this point it's a competition to see which company I'd rather have looking at my gay midget donkey fisting porn...


Dude, save that shiat across the board. Ain't no fun unless a brother's getting some.
 
2013-05-13 04:45:17 PM  
I think I have something like 70GB of free storage on my Dropbox account, but I can't be bothered to use it. My phone pushes photos directly to Picasa and I have a nifty little tool that duplicates all the MS Office documents I work on in Google Docs every time I save them locally. Those things match my workflow better, so that's what I prefer to use.

15GB is a crap-ton of space for regular documents and personal .jpegs though.
 
2013-05-13 04:49:35 PM  
Or you could use BitTorrent Sync and get as much storage as you want.
 
2013-05-13 04:49:43 PM  

dukeblue219: meanmutton: I'd rather name mine "Dropbox" but that's mainly out of inertia.

We were looking for a way to sync ~1GB of files across 7-10 lab laptops for work trips. A cheap, easy solution was all we needed -- no need for any complex "enterprise" system or a more elaborate version-control and access-control type system. Just something to make sure a certain set of files were always available on every computer. Dropbox was the easiest solution. Google drive is *similar* but just didn't feel as transparent or easy to deploy as Dropbox.


A couple of the groups at my company initially used cloud storage, including both Google Drive and Dropbox, but were roundly chastised because some of our IP was actually stored on those systems. We don't use cloud storage any more (the company implemented a storage solution we can access remotely.)

My advice is to never, ever store anything you wouldn't want someone else to look at - financial records, medical records, legal records, intellectual property, identifying documents, etc. - in cloud storage unless you have, in writing, assurances from the storage provider that your content is inviolate. Dropbox has been hacked a couple of times now, and both SkyDrive & Google Drive are clearly mining their "free" storage.
 
2013-05-13 04:52:02 PM  
I will try to be impressed with my 50 Gig Box account...
 
2013-05-13 04:54:39 PM  
I pay for the 100G yearly plan of Dropbox along with a few promotional space bumps.  Has been very handy.  Anything I care about also goes into a trucrypt container.
 
2013-05-13 04:55:28 PM  
Happy with my 50GB Skydrive, TYVM
 
2013-05-13 04:55:38 PM  
Meanwhile, I have 3TB network drive that's mapped to my laptop that I can also access with my TV or from anywhere (even outside of my home network) with my phone or tablet.  And I can login from any computer.  And I can share files with people as I choose.  And it was like $150.
 
2013-05-13 04:56:44 PM  

FormlessOne: My advice is to never, ever store anything you wouldn't want someone else to look at - financial records, medical records, legal records, intellectual property, identifying documents, etc. - in cloud storage unless you have, in writing, assurances from the storage provider that your content is inviolate.


If you're really worried about it, there's such a thing as encryption.
Chances are that if you've pissed off a first world government enough, that's not going to matter, but for normal purposes probably anything you do would be overkill.

Yes, that does make cloud storage less useful since the "mobile" versions (particular the iOS one) rely on having builtin viewers to deal with content, but if the content can be retrieved with relative ease by authorized parties I still don't think that's too horrible.
 
2013-05-13 04:57:05 PM  

RoxtarRyan: While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.

/not a fan of becoming completely reliant on the cloud


I'm with you on this in general, though those services do have their uses. I use Google Drive for documents, but mainly creating them in Google Docs, which stores them in Google Drive.

Dropbox I use for transferring photos from my phone, and so I can use my tablet to send text messages through my phone (the synch program uses dropbox to communicate between phone and tablet). I have the camera folder on my phone shared with Dropbox, so I can browse and copy my phone's photos at will. I also use it for sharing small document files with myself... For instance this weekend I went back to NJ for a family reunion type thing, and I had a txt file with the addresses of my accomodations and the hotel where my family was having the event in my dropbox folder so I could open it from my phone or tablet and easily copy/paste the info in to GPS programs and such.

But actual media files - like movies and music... That's not what the cloud is best for. To access those files while I'm driving around town I still need to use bandwidth. If I'm going to do that, I'll just use Plex - which is a much more powerful solution. On top of that 15 gigs isn't even close to enough for me for media. That's less than the the size of the music I keep on my phone and tablet. 32gig microSD cards aren't all that pricey anymore, and I can access the files faster and without using bandwidth. Plex will let me stream all of my around 7 TB of media, so why would I want to store less than a memory card's worth of it on the cloud?
 
2013-05-13 04:59:29 PM  
FormlessOne:

A couple of the groups at my company initially used cloud storage, including both Google Drive and Dropbox, but were roundly chastised because some of our IP was actually stored on those systems. We don't use cloud storage any more (the company implemented a storage solution we can access remotely.)

My advice is to never, ever store anything you wouldn't want someone else to look at - financial records, medical records, legal records, intellectual property, identifying documents, etc. - in cloud storage unless you have, in writing, assurances from the storage provider that your content is inviolate. Dropbox has been hacked a couple of times now, and both SkyDrive & Google Drive are clearly mining their "free" storage.


Or you know, you could just encrypt it up there.  We use Dropbox internally, but inside our Dropbox directories we have a Truecrypt container that's exported as a drive to the system.  End users just unlock it with a password and it shows up as a drive letter for ease of use and Dropbox has no way of reading it, to them it's a big ol' black box.
 
2013-05-13 05:00:30 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Neat, but it really comes down to there isn't much in terms of data I have that's both small enough to fit inside of 15GB and trivial enough that I wouldn't mind it when ever google employees read it/scan it/sell its metadata to the highest bidder.  And yes, they are definitely scanning the contents of anything you put there.


Same here for me too.  The only things I really need to backup for redundancy are my photo's/video's that I've taken myself and a few text documents with important stuff on them.  The photo's and video's are approx 50GB so too big for the free storage and the text documents are plenty small enough but I wouldn't trust the information to strangers.

Personal backups is still the best solution for me.  If done right it's fairly safe (only if several drives failed on one day could I be in trouble) and no-one can gain access to anything without my permission.

That said, I can see that something like this could be useful for someone with a load of lower res family/holiday photo's that they wanted to keep safe.  Not really of any use to anyone who did hack the data but precious enough that they are worth keeping that extra backup for.
 
2013-05-13 05:01:45 PM  

Arkanaut: czetie: Arkanaut: In fact that's hardly adequate.

That's what she said.

Tell your mother I'm sorry.


She says it's OK. Also, if you get a rash in the next few days, you might want to get it looked at.
 
2013-05-13 05:02:51 PM  
Seriously people, if you want to use a cloud storage drive for your media just use Plex instead. You have to leave a computer running at home, but the size of the media you can share that way is only limited by the storage capacity of the computer running the server program.
 
2013-05-13 05:12:28 PM  

dukeblue219: bob_ross: I got 250GB of drop box for free.

How?


By following this one weird tip.
 
2013-05-13 05:19:18 PM  

mongbiohazard: I'm with you on this in general, though those services do have their uses. I use Google Drive for documents, but mainly creating them in Google Docs, which stores them in Google Drive.


Damn right! I used them the most when I was working on a document with a friend who lives in Cali, on the other side of the country. I'm against relying primarily on cloud storage for a few reasons though. I'm big fan of local storage of documents/pictures/video in case the internet isn't available and the device you are accessing the document hasn't been powered on to receive the updated doc, but also when it comes to accessing music and video on the go. Listening to music stored primarily on the cloud/watching a video on a mobile device can easily put people above their data caps, and with faster internet speeds and lower caps (but higher costs) being made available to customers, using it for media isn't a habit that is a good one to get into as it can become costly if people don't watch their data usage. When having to drive the hour to and back from college and listening to streaming radio, I remember it adding up to about 800-900 gigs per month or so (forgot what the app was at the time that I used). Nowadays, just listening to the RT Podcasts once a week uses about 800MB/month in mobile data. Isn't too big of a deal though, seeing as how I'm thankfully grandfathered into unlimited.
 
2013-05-13 05:20:08 PM  

dukeblue219: RoxtarRyan: While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.

Well, then Dropbox and Google Drive are perfect for you, because you'll always have the local copies. All most people use them for is to sync your files across multiple devices. You always have the local version on your actual hard drive, and if that version gets corrupted or overwritten because of a change on another device you can just revert back.

Seriously, it's file sync'ing and the ability to access via the web version from any computer. It's *not* cloud-only storage.


Plus when you delete files the cloud-stored copies are retained for a certain period of time, longer if you have a paid account. Lets you restore things you may have deleted and changed your mind about. I have a paid account because I use Dropbox to keep both personal and work files/projects synced across my workstation and laptop. $10/month for 100GB is pretty great.

MrEricSir: Or you could use BitTorrent Sync and get as much storage as you want.


I work at a University, BitTorrent protocols are blocked/monitored on our network. So that isn't a good solution for lots of people.
 
2013-05-13 05:20:18 PM  

darwinpolice: dukeblue219: bob_ross: I got 250GB of drop box for free.

How?

By following this one weird tip.


is this a continuation of the conversation between czetie/Arkanaut?
 
2013-05-13 05:21:06 PM  

RoxtarRyan: mongbiohazard: I'm with you on this in general, though those services do have their uses. I use Google Drive for documents, but mainly creating them in Google Docs, which stores them in Google Drive.

Damn right! I used them the most when I was working on a document with a friend who lives in Cali, on the other side of the country. I'm against relying primarily on cloud storage for a few reasons though. I'm big fan of local storage of documents/pictures/video in case the internet isn't available and the device you are accessing the document hasn't been powered on to receive the updated doc, but also when it comes to accessing music and video on the go. Listening to music stored primarily on the cloud/watching a video on a mobile device can easily put people above their data caps, and with faster internet speeds and lower caps (but higher costs) being made available to customers, using it for media isn't a habit that is a good one to get into as it can become costly if people don't watch their data usage. When having to drive the hour to and back from college and listening to streaming radio, I remember it adding up to about 800-900 gigs per month or so (forgot what the app was at the time that I used). Nowadays, just listening to the RT Podcasts once a week uses about 800MB/month in mobile data. Isn't too big of a deal though, seeing as how I'm thankfully grandfathered into unlimited.


800-900GB/month for streaming music?!  Holy shizzle man what were they streaming, FLACs? :)
 
2013-05-13 05:22:17 PM  

RoxtarRyan: When having to drive the hour to and back from college and listening to streaming radio, I remember it adding up to about 800-900 gigs per month or so


I think you mean megabytes. Otherwise, no freakin' way.
 
2013-05-13 05:23:04 PM  

entropic_existence: Plus when you delete files the cloud-stored copies are retained for a certain period of time, longer if you have a paid account. Lets you restore things you may have deleted and changed your mind about.


No deletions... Even my temporary downloads folder is backed up! (I'm abusive when it comes to my backed up storage... 350GB since I've cleaned out the temp download backup folder). Hell, hard discs are cheap, better to backup and forget about it then delete it and regret it.
 
2013-05-13 05:23:41 PM  

BumpInTheNight: 800-900GB/month for streaming music?! Holy shizzle man what were they streaming, FLACs? :)


dukeblue219: RoxtarRyan: When having to drive the hour to and back from college and listening to streaming radio, I remember it adding up to about 800-900 gigs per month or so

I think you mean megabytes. Otherwise, no freakin' way.


You're both right!

/whoops.
 
2013-05-13 05:30:53 PM  

RoxtarRyan: While nice, I prefer to have my media and files on hand.

/not a fan of becoming completely reliant on the cloud


I have my media all backed up to Google Drive, and I have the app on all of my computers.  With this set up, I have the files "on hand" on all of my computers, and they're all synced.  And it's all backed up to the cloud as well.  It's incredible redundancy.

And I have my iTunes using the same synced library file, meaning my iTunes library basically exists on all of my computers.  I can sync my phone to any of them, and if I add music to my laptop it can be played almost immediately on my desktop (and will be in the library).

The cloud is nothing but a tool, you can use it how you want.
 
2013-05-13 05:36:38 PM  

burndtdan: With this set up, I have the files "on hand" on all of my computers, and they're all synced. And it's all backed up to the cloud as well. It's incredible redundancy.


No doubt Google has made it seamless, it is just not something I want to rely on primarily. One of my work laptops is only powered on twice a week (and often in the field where there may be no internet), so unless I power it up here and sync it, GD isn't going to help me out. Easier to just put the files onto a flash drive on my keys rather than take out the laptop, power it up and log into the vpn only to sync a file or two.
 
2013-05-13 05:52:05 PM  
So i now have 15 gbs from google 25 from dropbox(because of the phone app) and 7 gbs with skydrive

am I leaving anyone out?
 
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