Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Register)   No mom, you don't give out scanned copies of your bank statement to an email asking for it. Wait, what? It's Apple? It might be genuine   (theregister.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Fail, El Reg  
•       •       •

12984 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 May 2013 at 1:31 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



98 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-13 01:36:50 PM  
Genuine? I still wouldn't send my details to them.

/Fark Apple.
 
2013-05-13 01:37:23 PM  
I can understand the need for proof-positive ID in cases of suspected fraud or trying to reclaim a stolen account (went through it with Blizzard)...but randomly asking for these things during a standard purchase?  Over the line.  Yet another reason for this overgrown toy company to be brought back down to earth and soon.
 
2013-05-13 01:37:47 PM  
FTA: As our reader had scans of the documents to hand, she emailed over copies of them... and then immediately began panicking.

People like this are why spam is always going to be lucrative business.
 
2013-05-13 01:39:56 PM  
Jeez, buy online and get this. Go to their store and the employees have the police beat you.

Very exclusive club they're running.
 
2013-05-13 01:40:27 PM  
People like this are also the reason everyone has a dieing uncle in Nigeria.
 
2013-05-13 01:41:01 PM  
Genuine Apple products with genuine Apple support.

Nice fruit(case) business.
 
2013-05-13 01:46:58 PM  
What's next? Will they ask for my inside leg measurement or a chest X-ray?

No. But I might
 
2013-05-13 01:51:03 PM  
you NEVER copy a passport
 
2013-05-13 01:57:22 PM  
(rta)  Wow...major fail.
 
2013-05-13 02:01:46 PM  

pastorkius: FTA: As our reader had scans of the documents to hand, she emailed over copies of them... and then immediately began panicking.

People like this are why spam is always going to be lucrative business.


No shiat. I would never hand over these docs to a company. Now if someone like the President of Nigeria were to ask..
 
2013-05-13 02:04:33 PM  
Way over the line. Fark Apple.
 
2013-05-13 02:04:57 PM  
How dare a company request identifying information about me prior to mailing me hundreds of dollars of equipment that was "paid" for via an unprocessed credit transaction?
 
2013-05-13 02:06:49 PM  
ftfa: ...and when we phoned the fruity firm's customer services branch posing as a fanboi...

ohyou.jpg
 
2013-05-13 02:07:05 PM  

pastorkius: FTA: As our reader had scans of the documents to hand, she emailed over copies of them... and then immediately began panicking.

People like this are why spam is always going to be lucrative business.


Yea, I don't get that. It's not like she mindlessly clicked a link or entered a password. She scanned, prepared, and e-mailed identifying documents. How do you go through all of that and only afterwards think to yourself, "Wait...this seems suspicious." It's like walking into your house and cooking dinner, only realizing later that, oh, whoops, this isn't my house.
 
2013-05-13 02:07:48 PM  
Also, crucial part missing in the Guardian's quote of the email:
Please scan a copy of the following documentation to us in jpeg format
and email toe­u­rof­i­nance[nospam-﹫-backwards]oru­e*app­le*c­om as soon as possible (Please
quote your Web Order Reference number when sending):

A copy of
1) Card holders Drivers license or National Identity Card or Passport
and
2) Recent Credit Card / Bank Statement showing card holder name, address
and card number. Please feel free to black-out any other
non-relevant information.
 
2013-05-13 02:08:47 PM  

Theaetetus: How dare a company request identifying information about me prior to mailing me hundreds of dollars of equipment that was "paid" for via an unprocessed credit transaction?


Exactly, how dare they? Large corporations should be more like politicians. They don't need to care where the money comes from as long as they get it.
 
2013-05-13 02:10:04 PM  

BumpInTheNight: (went through it with Blizzard)


Back in 06 I wanted to reclaim my WoW account but didn't remember my info to login. At first I sent them a copy of my ID at their request but then they said I needed a notarized copy. The lady I saw at the bank was thoroughly confused as to why I would need this when I could tell them every detail about the account.
 
2013-05-13 02:10:26 PM  
This is an easy way to steal an identity. Seriously, it is ridiculously easy to make an email look like "­support­[nospam-﹫-backwards]e­lppa­*c­om" in your web browser (even moreso if you don't bother to check the headers) to pass off as a real thing (spoofing email addresses have been around as long as the internet has).

Way to make the jobs of blackhats easier, Apple!


prjindigo: you NEVER copy a passport


Well, it does say in a US passport to make copies for emergency contacts at home, but yeah... sending copies over email? Dumb.
 
2013-05-13 02:13:12 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Theaetetus: How dare a company request identifying information about me prior to mailing me hundreds of dollars of equipment that was "paid" for via an unprocessed credit transaction?

Exactly, how dare they? Large corporations should be more like politicians. They don't need to care where the money comes from as long as they get it.


The bigger problem, of course, is the fact that the bank will issue a charge back to Apple (or any other merchant) several days later if it does turn out to be a fraudulent transaction. Meaning:
1. Buy iPad.
2. Call bank and report card stolen.
3. If Apple can't collect your personal information before shipping or before getting the charge back, then profit!

Now, sure, they could simply assume every customer is a thief and not ship product until the charges have cleared... meaning you can order a product and wait up to two weeks before they even ship. I'm sure the people at the Guardian would love that type of customer service.
Instead, they just request ID, and not even from all customers - just when something trips their fraud-o-meter, like shipping to a PO Box in Tirana.
 
2013-05-13 02:15:25 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Theaetetus: How dare a company request identifying information about me prior to mailing me hundreds of dollars of equipment that was "paid" for via an unprocessed credit transaction?

Exactly, how dare they? Large corporations should be more like politicians. They don't need to care where the money comes from as long as they get it.


It's not their job to do this verification and it's over the line in typical Apple control freak fashion.
 
2013-05-13 02:15:29 PM  

Theaetetus: Recent Credit Card / Bank Statement showing card holder name, address
and card number. Please feel free to black-out any other
non-relevant information.


For a scam artist, hell, they don't care if you spent $34.21 at the gas station or any other transactions. Name, address and number is all a lot of places want in order to run it. That is like saying "please send us a copy of your house key, but feel free the scratch off any irrelevant information like the manufacturer of the key." Who the fark cares at that point? They have all the info they need.
 
2013-05-13 02:19:00 PM  
I called my credit union the other day to change my home address and in addition to the normal questions verify my identity (last 4 SSN, Bank account #) they wanted to know the password to my online bank account. I pretty much laughed my ass off and told them no. Fortunately they let me answer other questions but that's seriously not something they should be asking me AT ALL. I emailed their customer support but i don't see them changing that policy any time soon. Seriously, who thought it was a good idea for some random customer service jockey to be allowed to see my password for verification?
 
2013-05-13 02:22:01 PM  

Theaetetus: How dare a company request identifying information about me prior to mailing me hundreds of dollars of equipment that was "paid" for via an unprocessed credit transaction?


It was a credit card order. I use them all the time online with large ticket items. I've never been asked to send extremely personal information to continue to process an order.
Any company that requires this sort of information should be shunned.
 
2013-05-13 02:24:17 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Theaetetus: Recent Credit Card / Bank Statement showing card holder name, address
and card number. Please feel free to black-out any other
non-relevant information.

For a scam artist, hell, they don't care if you spent $34.21 at the gas station or any other transactions. Name, address and number is all a lot of places want in order to run it. That is like saying "please send us a copy of your house key, but feel free the scratch off any irrelevant information like the manufacturer of the key." Who the fark cares at that point? They have all the info they need.


Ever bought anything, anywhere, not using cash? Congratulations, you just gave someone all the information they need to be a scam artist. Your waiter can copy your credit card numbers down really quickly before returning the slip, and place as many orders as they want, until you catch it. Since you've got your card, you wouldn't even report it stolen.
If you want to participate in economic transactions, you have to be aware of the risks, and also not be so paranoid as to refuse to turn over any information. From the other party's perspective,  youare the potential scam artist, and why should they deal with you if you refuse to identify yourself?
 
2013-05-13 02:24:33 PM  
i.i.com.com
 
2013-05-13 02:26:22 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Theaetetus: How dare a company request identifying information about me prior to mailing me hundreds of dollars of equipment that was "paid" for via an unprocessed credit transaction?

It was a credit card order. I use them all the time online with large ticket items. I've never been asked to send extremely personal information to continue to process an order.


Do you live in a small eastern european country with questionable legal enforcement? Do you ship to an anonymous PO Box? Do you ship to a different shipping address than your credit card billing address?
Huh. Perhaps your personal experience is non-representative.
 
2013-05-13 02:26:25 PM  

hawcian: pastorkius: FTA: As our reader had scans of the documents to hand, she emailed over copies of them... and then immediately began panicking.

People like this are why spam is always going to be lucrative business.

Yea, I don't get that. It's not like she mindlessly clicked a link or entered a password. She scanned, prepared, and e-mailed identifying documents. How do you go through all of that and only afterwards think to yourself, "Wait...this seems suspicious." It's like walking into your house and cooking dinner, only realizing later that, oh, whoops, this isn't my house.


A completely excusable mistake. I had been drinking, dammit. But the strange family did enjoy the dinner I made.
 
2013-05-13 02:27:25 PM  
1) This will become more widely publicized

2) Scammers will start sending out emails en masse saying the equivalent thing, except changing the email to something like verif­y[nospam-﹫-backwards]e­p­orue-­elpp­a­*r­u

3) This blows up after people lose money to scammers, causing Apple to discontinue or severely modify the policy.
 
2013-05-13 02:32:26 PM  

c152atn67: 1) This will become more widely publicized

2) Scammers will start sending out emails en masse saying the equivalent thing, except changing the email to something like verify[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]eporue-elppa[* image 7x13]ru

3) This blows up after people lose money to scammers, causing Apple to discontinue or severely modify the policy.

 
2013-05-13 02:34:02 PM  

c152atn67: 1) This will become more widely publicized

2) Scammers will start sending out emails en masse saying the equivalent thing, except changing the email to something like verify[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]eporue-elppa[* image 7x13]ru

3) This blows up after people lose money to scammers, causing Apple to discontinue or severely modify the policy.


4) Scammers start ordering stuff from Apple with stolen credit card numbers.

5) Apple loses money to scammers, causing Apple to reimplement the policy.

It would have to be banks that modify the policy by not issuing charge backs to merchants due to fraud.
 
2013-05-13 02:44:36 PM  

Theaetetus: Ever bought anything, anywhere, not using cash? Congratulations, you just gave someone all the information they need to be a scam artist. Your waiter can copy your credit card numbers down really quickly before returning the slip, and place as many orders as they want, until you catch it. Since you've got your card, you wouldn't even report it stolen.


Oh, this happens more often than people like to realize! IIRC, there have even been greenlights on Fark about it. Knowing how easy it is, I made it a point when over in the Dominican Republic earlier this year to not use my card for anything, keeping it locked away. Thankfully, the resort we were staying was all-inclusive, so I didn't even use up the cash I had on hand.

Theaetetus: If you want to participate in economic transactions, you have to be aware of the risks, and also not be so paranoid as to refuse to turn over any information. From the other party's perspective, youare the potential scam artist, and why should they deal with you if you refuse to identify yourself?


Again, seeing how easy it is to spoof email addresses and how people have been sending emails asking for bank account/credit card info for years, this is something NO company should do in their right mind. Get in contact with them by saying, "hey, we need you to call Apple Support to verify something." Damn near every email from my bank or any other company makes it a point to put in many of their emails do NOT respond to this, and when emailing anything, even internally, has people to never include PII (P2, or otherwise known as "personally identifiable information").

Please stop defending a company trying to have people send extremely sensitive information over unsecured email. It is just makes you look silly.
 
2013-05-13 02:45:38 PM  
Incidentally, this isn't an Apple-exclusive thing... Here's a site of recommendations for merchants to avoid credit card fraud:
...However, liability for fraud shifts from the card issuer to the merchant forCard Not Present sales (mail order, telephone/fax order, and internet sales). The merchant is generally liable for credit card charge backs, even when the bank has authorized the transaction.

... Ask for copy of credit card and driver's license.
When a credit card order is received by fax, phone or Web, require the customer to also fax/email copies of both sides of the credit card. This at least provides proof that the customer has possession of the credit card at the time of the order. You could also require a copy of their state-issued ID, or drivers license. It also provides additional proof the person authorized the purchase, preventing a chargeback.
 
2013-05-13 02:51:56 PM  

Theaetetus: Here's a site of recommendations for merchants to avoid credit card fraud:


A men's clothing website telling people it is ok to have users email credit card info? Sounds legit!

/christ, people will defend anything their company of choice does
//fanboyism at its finest
 
2013-05-13 02:52:16 PM  
RoxtarRyan: Again, seeing how easy it is to spoof email addresses and how people have been sending emails asking for bank account/credit card info for years, this is something NO company should do in their right mind. Get in contact with them by saying, "hey, we need you to call Apple Support to verify something." Damn near every email from my bank or any other company makes it a point to put in many of their emails do NOT respond to this, and when emailing anything, even internally, has people to never include PII (P2, or otherwise known as "personally identifiable information").

While you're correct that it's easy to spoof an email address in a link, your suggestion doesn't solve it. For proof- I mean, in a completely unrelated matter, I just received a letter from your bank, Ryan. They want you to call them at 212-867-5309. Ask for Jenny in customer service. She's standing by to collect all of your identifying information to verify who you are so that you can resolve this issue in your account.

In other words, simply including a phone number doesn't help.

But, that said, it's difficult to completely take over a domain, so providing them with a  non-linked email address or saying "type in our email address at customer service at apple dot com" will help.

Please stop defending a company trying to have people send extremely sensitive information over unsecured email. It is just makes you look silly.

This is just like the old Greenpeace anti-Apple astroturf... Take an issue that applies universally to every merchant, but only complain about Apple specifically, because they're cool and hip and that'll get you more notice. I'm not defending Apple, I'm defending every merchant who follows the anti-fraud guidelines in that link I posted earlier, and attacking this sort of blind anti-Apple derp that fails to look any deeper than "Apple did it, must be bad."
 
2013-05-13 02:52:52 PM  
I almost fell for this obvious satire, until I got to the name, "Nick Pickles".  Come on.  Oh, you saucy minx, you didn't fool me.
 
2013-05-13 02:57:53 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Theaetetus: Here's a site of recommendations for merchants to avoid credit card fraud:

A men's clothing website telling people it is ok to have users email credit card info? Sounds legit!

/christ, people will defend anything their company of choice does
//fanboyism at its finest


Nice ad hominem. But if you don't like clothing b2b, how about software? And that was just a hit on the same exact phrase. I'm sure with a few minutes on Google, you can find financial advisors for any industry giving the same instructions.

/Troll much?
 
2013-05-13 02:59:20 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Theaetetus: Here's a site of recommendations for merchants to avoid credit card fraud:

A men's clothing website telling people it is ok to have users email credit card info? Sounds legit!

/christ, people will defend anything their company of choice does
//fanboyism at its finest


Don't listen to any logic, keep parroting the same garbage.
haterism at its finest
 
2013-05-13 03:00:46 PM  

Theaetetus: But, that said, it's difficult to completely take over a domain, so providing them with a non-linked email address or saying "type in our email address at customer service at apple dot com" will help.


Nailed it, dead on. Have in there, "please open your browser, log into your Apple account and call the number listed" would be MUCH better than this.

Theaetetus: Take an issue that applies universally to every merchant

, but only complain about Apple specifically, because they're cool and hip and that'll get you more notice.

Please, please post me an example of another large, legit company, especially one known to be user friendly and secure, that sends emails out asking for credit card info. The reason why people are railing Apple for this isn't because they are "hip and cool", it is because it is an example of gross negligence of "Using The Internet 101". It is right up there with not even responding to spam emails, since it pretty much verifies to the sender that the email address it was received at is valid.

Again, a lot of companies even put in their emails to not include passwords when sending emails out to them, forget credit card info! Every bank email I have ever received, every email from Paypal regarding my account, or anything else like that has a statement like "We will never ask for your account info" somewhere in the email.  I have never heard of a single legit company asking for photocopies of bank statements and other sensitive info. Never. I mean, if you can show otherwise, awesome, but this is something that is so mind-bendingly stupid, I would hope no company has ever done it before!
 
2013-05-13 03:00:54 PM  
Here's another one, Ryan. Unless you think that a credit card authorization service provider is also an unreasonably biased source when discussing credit card authorization?
 
2013-05-13 03:07:41 PM  
"Apple told me they carry out spot checks for security reasons. But I don't think any private company should have the right to ask you to send over such personal documents by email.

Of course they have the right to ask you dumbbell.

Just like you have the ability to decline.
 
2013-05-13 03:08:39 PM  

Theaetetus: But if you don't like clothing b2b, how about software?


Dude, you can put as many sources as you like, it doesn't make emailing or asking for credit card info and bank statements any less dumb. I'm finding it really difficult to understand why people think this is an OK practice.

And seriously, if you think arguing against Apple asking for P2 over email is trolling... c'mon. Really? I mean, how the hell can you defend this? I don't care what company does it, if any company does it, it is goddamn stupid, and they don't deserve to have my business. If Woot starts doing it, Amazon, Google, or even Fark starts asking for it, I don't give a shiat. They are done. This is basic goddamn knowledge that you don't send it out, why place your customers into a state of complacency by asking for it, even moreso if the computer or email they are sending it from may be unsecure and compromised?
 
2013-05-13 03:10:34 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Please, please post me an example of another large, legit company, especially one known to be user friendly and secure, that sends emails out asking for credit card info.


Forgive me for stating the obvious, but I think every company in the world that does credit card sales asks for your credit card information at some point. If they don't take your numbers via a webpage, then they're going to send you an invoice, frequently by email.
Maybe that's not what you meant?

The reason why people are railing Apple for this isn't because they are "hip and cool", it is because it is an example of gross negligence of "Using The Internet 101".

"Gross negligence" that is recommended by the credit industry... Uh huh.

It is right up there with not even responding to spam emails, since it pretty much verifies to the sender that the email address it was received at is valid.

Clicking on a link is easily spoofed, yes. But you'll note that they actually did your suggestion and included a fax number in the email for the customer to fax personal information to. Frankly, I think that's a huge hole, but you were cool with it.

Again, a lot of companies even put in their emails to not include passwords when sending emails out to them, forget credit card info! Every bank email I have ever received, every email from Paypal regarding my account, or anything else like that has a statement like "We will never ask for your account info" somewhere in the email.  I have never heard of a single legit company asking for photocopies of bank statements and other sensitive info. Never. I mean, if you can show otherwise, awesome, but this is something that is so mind-bendingly stupid, I would hope no company has ever done it before!

True story - I tried PayPal's "BillMeLater" service for a purchase, and got a call from someone in their customer service office wanting me to verify my social security number and other information. I didn't give it (since how do you know who someone is, just because they called you?), and PayPal refused to issue the credit. So, yes, PayPal does do the same exact identity verification (with the same exact type of security flaws) for the same exact reason. But no one rails against PayPal, because they're not cool.
 
2013-05-13 03:10:43 PM  

Theaetetus: Here's another one, Ryan. Unless you think that a credit card authorization service provider is also an unreasonably biased source when discussing credit card authorization?


Same info word for word as the previous site, same response word for word as the previous link. Any company who asks for that doesn't get it. Plain and simple. There are other, non-compromising ways of authenticating that doesn't put the end user at risk.
 
2013-05-13 03:15:18 PM  

Theaetetus: True story - I tried PayPal's "BillMeLater" service for a purchase, and got a call from someone in their customer service office wanting me to verify my social security number and other information. I didn't give it (since how do you know who someone is, just because they called you?)


See, that is good practice! What they should have done, is taken a look at if the primary contact number has been changed, call it up, and ask to verify the purchase (cost, place of purchase, etc). No need to verify entire socials, etc. It is bullshiat, and just like you didn't give it the info out because (and here is the kicker) it is a dumb farking idea to give that shiat out, Paypal shouldn't have asked. Just like Apple shouldn't be going about this like it is now.

Of course, when Paypal or any other company gets a headline, yeah, sit back and watch people rail against it. No one in their right mind is going to say "well, they are just a small company, who cares if they have lax security procedures?"
 
2013-05-13 03:20:24 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Theaetetus: But if you don't like clothing b2b, how about software?

Dude, you can put as many sources as you like, it doesn't make emailing or asking for credit card info and bank statements any less dumb. I'm finding it really difficult to understand why people think this is an OK practice.

And seriously, if you think arguing against Apple asking for P2 over email is trolling... c'mon. Really?


Nope, I called this trolling:
/christ, people will defend anything their company of choice does
//fanboyism at its finest

and it is. If you're going to troll, at least have the balls to admit it.

I mean, how the hell can you defend this?

Because, as long as credit card companies put fraud liability on the merchant for internet sales, the merchant has a right to take steps to protect themselves against fraud or refuse to deal with people who won't provide information. Shiat, I'd rather see the credit card companies fix the issue, but I'm not going to blame Apple, Best Buy, PayPal, or Joe Schmoe's House of Internet Sales for taking the steps that the industry recommends.

I don't care what company does it, if any company does it, it is goddamn stupid, and they don't deserve to have my business. If Woot starts doing it, Amazon, Google, or even Fark starts asking for it, I don't give a shiat. They are done.

That's absolutely your right. I'm sure you'll be missed.

This is basic goddamn knowledge that you don't send it out, why place your customers into a state of complacency by asking for it, even moreso if the computer or email they are sending it from may be unsecure and compromised?

Because if you don't do anything, then the scammers will rip you off, and the credit card companies will gleefully refuse to pay you.
My question for you - presuming that you like a merchant enough to purchase from them, why would you want them to give up any protection from being ripped off by scam artists?
 
2013-05-13 03:22:27 PM  
FTA: ...when we phoned the fruity firm's customer services branch posing as a fanboi, they confirmed that agents did indeed ask for copies of customers' driving licence, passport and bank statements.

The ability to do this is written into Apple's terms and conditions, as mentioned in the letter quoted above.


Dafuq.  I'm confused as to who is the bigger megalomaniac: Apple or Facebook?
 
2013-05-13 03:25:19 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Theaetetus: True story - I tried PayPal's "BillMeLater" service for a purchase, and got a call from someone in their customer service office wanting me to verify my social security number and other information. I didn't give it (since how do you know who someone is, just because they called you?)

See, that is good practice! What they should have done, is taken a look at if the primary contact number has been changed, call it up, and ask to verify the purchase (cost, place of purchase, etc). No need to verify entire socials, etc.


Maybe you misunderstood - this was the first attempt using that service. There was no previous purchase to verify. They could verify the information I just gave them, but that's like asking someone to sign a piece of paper in front of you, and then asking what possibly fake name they signed: "I signed 'Mickey Mouse'." "Yes, Mr. Mouse, and thank you for confirming that. We'll send out your purchase immediately."

I understand your complaint. But I also understand that, so far, none of your suggestions have successfully provided fraud protection for the merchant. And that's why your complaint, though legitimate, is also irrelevant.
 
2013-05-13 03:32:44 PM  

Theaetetus: Because if you don't do anything, then the scammers will rip you off, and the credit card companies will gleefully refuse to pay you.
My question for you - presuming that you like a merchant enough to purchase from them, why would you want them to give up any protection from being ripped off by scam artists?


Check those links you gave. They gave plenty of alternative ways to authenticate.
Still don't know why you continue to defend this, but whatever. You made it a point earlier that companies (asking in ways that you can't verify) for sensitive info isn't going to get it because it is insecure, yet you continue to defend it. Makes no sense.
 
2013-05-13 03:32:45 PM  

Theaetetus: How dare a company request identifying information about me prior to mailing me hundreds of dollars of equipment that was "paid" for via an unprocessed credit transaction?


seriously?  You are WAY the fark too smart ot have written that.  Might want to start locking your computer when you are away from your desk.  I KNOW you know negotiable instruments laws better than that, among other things
 
2013-05-13 03:35:46 PM  

PsyLord: FTA: ...when we phoned the fruity firm's customer services branch posing as a fanboi, they confirmed that agents did indeed ask for copies of customers' driving licence, passport and bank statements.

The ability to do this is written into Apple's terms and conditions, as mentioned in the letter quoted above.

Dafuq.  I'm confused as to who is the bigger megalomaniac: Apple or Facebook?


Yes.
 
Displayed 50 of 98 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report