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(Cracked)   Check out these 7 classic movies that are actually rip-offs, so let's get Up and out of here, Ted   (cracked.com) divider line 55
    More: Interesting, Dredd, battle royale, Japanese films, A Clockwork Orange, construction zone, Karl Urban, house left, animated short  
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2839 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 13 May 2013 at 12:37 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-13 09:57:12 AM
They missed the number one rip of all time.

Airplane! is taken, in some cases almost word-for-word, from a movie called Zero Hour. Unfortunately, Zero Hour was supposed to be a serious movie. After watching Airplane!, it is itself a comedy.
 
2013-05-13 10:35:07 AM
When the Japanese movie was re-released for American audiences, they included a cheeky reference in the trailer, which almost makes it sound like The Hunger Games was a remake:

Hunger Games is sooooooo the crappy version of Battle Royale.
 
2013-05-13 10:39:10 AM
First, we'll re-define the word "classic."
 
2013-05-13 10:59:29 AM

AnotherBluesStringer: First, we'll re-define the word "classic."


First thing that crossed my mind, too

/classic? wha?
 
2013-05-13 11:08:20 AM

mr_a: They missed the number one rip of all time.

Airplane! is taken, in some cases almost word-for-word, from a movie called Zero Hour. Unfortunately, Zero Hour was supposed to be a serious movie. After watching Airplane!, it is itself a comedy.


In case you aren't joking, it's called a "parody".

And yeah, they got a little liberal with the use of the word "classic".
 
2013-05-13 11:13:01 AM

Mugato: And yeah, they got a little liberal with the use of the word "classic".


they always do
 
2013-05-13 11:14:54 AM
Yes yes, and The Lion King is a ripoff of Hamlet and Star Wars is a ripoff of the Hidden Fortress, we're all very impressed.

When I hear someone cry "X is a ripoff of Y" what I generally hear is "Look how hip I am for liking this story before it was cool."
 
2013-05-13 11:22:24 AM
And West Side Story was a ripoff of Romeo and Juliet which was a ripoff Pyramus and Thisbe.

And Camille was a ripoff of La Traviata which was a ripoff of La Dame aux camélias.

And....
 
2013-05-13 11:26:27 AM

Diogenes: And West Side Story was a ripoff of Romeo and Juliet which was a ripoff Pyramus and Thisbe.

And Camille was a ripoff of La Traviata which was a ripoff of La Dame aux camélias.

And....


came here to say this
there hasnt been an original story since 36,438 BC
 
2013-05-13 11:37:29 AM
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheSevenBasicPlots
get back to me when you read/see a story which isnt a mash up of these

/WOOT the bad guy is a girl!! how a original! or a machine. or it was all a dream.
/ROFL
 
2013-05-13 11:40:23 AM
A T. S. Eliot quote that I think applies across artistic endeavors.

"One of the surest of tests is the way in which a poet borrows. Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different. The good poet welds his theft into a whole of feeling which is unique, utterly different from that from which it was torn; the bad poet throws it into something which has no cohesion. A good poet will usually borrow from authors remote in time, or alien in language, or diverse in interest."
 
2013-05-13 12:11:36 PM

namatad: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheSevenBasicPlots
get back to me when you read/see a story which isnt a mash up of these

/WOOT the bad guy is a girl!! how a original! or a machine. or it was all a dream.
/ROFL


Oh great, a TV Tropes link. So much for today's productivity.
 
2013-05-13 12:27:55 PM
AnotherBluesStringer

First, we'll re-define the word "classic."

Thank you for that. Maybe we need to rethink the 'Our Favorite Movie' phrase also.
 
2013-05-13 12:30:09 PM

pizen: namatad: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheSevenBasicPlots
get back to me when you read/see a story which isnt a mash up of these

/WOOT the bad guy is a girl!! how a original! or a machine. or it was all a dream.
/ROFL

Oh great, a TV Tropes link. So much for today's productivity.


Put the Internet down
and back slowly away
 
2013-05-13 12:33:38 PM
Stewie Griffin is such a dumb character.
 
2013-05-13 01:52:14 PM

unlikely: Yes yes, and The Lion King is a ripoff of Hamlet and Star Wars is a ripoff of the Hidden Fortress, we're all very impressed.


There's a big difference between thematic similarities, or even when an author says, "Let's do Hamlet with lions!", and when very detailed specific of the plot are lifted from another work.

That said, it sounds like Pixar improved the original. That one was neat, though. I never knew about that.

Avatar is a ripoff of everything.

The Ted one may be a bit of a stretch. Who hasn't imagined their stuffed animal coming to life and saying dirty words?
 
2013-05-13 02:37:42 PM

unlikely: Yes yes, and The Lion King is a ripoff of Hamlet


It's also a ripoff of a japanese manga.
 
2013-05-13 02:39:43 PM

pizen: namatad: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheSevenBasicPlots
get back to me when you read/see a story which isnt a mash up of these

/WOOT the bad guy is a girl!! how a original! or a machine. or it was all a dream.
/ROFL

Oh great, a TV Tropes link. So much for today's productivity.


Would be more interesting if every other line in the article wasn't "BIOSHOCK INFINITE BIOSHOCK INFINITE BIOSHOCK INFINITE BIOSHOCK INFINITE BIOSHOCK INFINITE BIOSHOCK INFINITE OMFG BIOSHOCK INFINITE  !!!!"
 
2013-05-13 03:15:54 PM

jonny_q: unlikely: Yes yes, and The Lion King is a ripoff of Hamlet and Star Wars is a ripoff of the Hidden Fortress, we're all very impressed.

There's a big difference between thematic similarities, or even when an author says, "Let's do Hamlet with lions!", and when very detailed specific of the plot are lifted from another work.

That said, it sounds like Pixar improved the original. That one was neat, though. I never knew about that.

Avatar is a ripoff of everything.

The Ted one may be a bit of a stretch. Who hasn't imagined their stuffed animal coming to life and saying dirty words?


So, it is more than most movies are just rip-offs of what a 7 year old thinks is funny?

/or, at least just Adam Sandler movies
 
2013-05-13 03:50:11 PM
Everything is a rip off of the first story ever told:  Oooga Booga by Joe Neanderthal (with forward by Captain Caveman).
 
2013-05-13 04:53:20 PM
The Up comparison is pretty lame.

FTFA: the only real difference between the films is that in Up, the old man goes on a bunch of zany jungle adventures with a fat kid and a talking dog, whereas in Above Then Beyond, the old lady dies and it's revealed to be a dream she had.


So in other words, Up shares the same premise -- a floating house -- and the other 98% of the story is different. Plus, the emotional center of Up is the relationship between the old man and his wife, and his unfulfilled promise to her. Yeah, maybe somebody at Pixar did see Above Then Beyond and and the visual image sparked the idea -- but to say that it's a ripoff makes as much sense as saying that Cars ripped off Bullitt.

"It's not about what it's about, it's about how it's about it" -- Roger Ebert.
 
2013-05-13 05:39:46 PM

czetie: The Up comparison is pretty lame.

FTFA: the only real difference between the films is that in Up, the old man goes on a bunch of zany jungle adventures with a fat kid and a talking dog, whereas in Above Then Beyond, the old lady dies and it's revealed to be a dream she had.


So in other words, Up shares the same premise -- a floating house -- and the other 98% of the story is different. Plus, the emotional center of Up is the relationship between the old man and his wife, and his unfulfilled promise to her. Yeah, maybe somebody at Pixar did see Above Then Beyond and and the visual image sparked the idea -- but to say that it's a ripoff makes as much sense as saying that Cars ripped off Bullitt.

"It's not about what it's about, it's about how it's about it" -- Roger Ebert.


THIS
this is when I stopped reading the article
talk about inane
 
2013-05-13 05:40:30 PM
Oh, come on. Every movie is a rip off of Star Wars. Every. Single. One.
 
2013-05-13 06:37:17 PM

feanorn: Oh, come on. Every movie is a rip off of Star Wars

The Hidden Fortress. Every. Single. One.

http://moviecultists.com/2009/11/09/10-famous-movies-that-are-total- ri poffs/
 
2013-05-13 06:58:30 PM

namatad: feanorn: Oh, come on. Every movie is a rip off of Star WarsThe Hidden Fortress. Every. Single. One.

http://moviecultists.com/2009/11/09/10-famous-movies-that-are-total- ri poffs/


Nope. *Even The Hidden Fortress* is a rip-off of Star Wars. Amazing, time-bending, counter-factual, but true.
 
2013-05-13 07:07:05 PM

feanorn: namatad: feanorn: Oh, come on. Every movie is a rip off of Star WarsThe Hidden Fortress. Every. Single. One.

http://moviecultists.com/2009/11/09/10-famous-movies-that-are-total- ri poffs/

Nope. *Even The Hidden Fortress* is a rip-off of Star Wars. Amazing, time-bending, counter-factual, but true.


well technically SW was a rip off of dr who ..... cause dr who was there on day zero ....
 
2013-05-13 07:53:14 PM
these films are "paying homage".
 
2013-05-13 07:56:21 PM
Not a classic by any means but The Island starring Obi-Wan and Black Widow was a shameless ripoff of Parts: The Clonus Horror, an MST3K favorite. So much to the point that there was a lawsuit. Spielberg was involved though so I doubt the Parts people won.
 
2013-05-13 08:05:59 PM

Sybarite: A T. S. Eliot quote that I think applies across artistic endeavors.

"One of the surest of tests is the way in which a poet borrows. Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different. The good poet welds his theft into a whole of feeling which is unique, utterly different from that from which it was torn; the bad poet throws it into something which has no cohesion. A good poet will usually borrow from authors remote in time, or alien in language, or diverse in interest."


This describes "UP".
 
2013-05-13 08:47:00 PM

doglover: Hunger Games is sooooooo the crappy version of Battle Royale.


Not sure if trolling, but I saw Battle Royale, and I've seen bits and pieces of Hunger Games.  HG has a much more extensive backstory and characterization.  There's much more material about the world that the characters live in -- for example, America being transformed into a resource-extraction state with widening wealth and income disparity -- that isn't there in BR, which plays out like a high school drama.  Certainly they're conceptually similar -- the core of HG being, in fact, a battle royale -- and it looks like HG borrowed some details, but Battle Royale is a much simpler story.
 
2013-05-13 09:00:34 PM

Arkanaut: Not sure if trolling, but I saw Battle Royale, and I've seen bits and pieces of Hunger Games.  HG has a much more extensive backstory and characterization.  There's much more material about the world that the characters live in -- for example, America being transformed into a resource-extraction state with widening wealth and income disparity -- that isn't there in BR, which plays out like a high school drama.  Certainly they're conceptually similar -- the core of HG being, in fact, a battle royale -- and it looks like HG borrowed some details, but Battle Royale is a much simpler story.


But it's a foreign film, which automatically makes it better. For some reason.
 
2013-05-13 09:07:23 PM

namatad: http://moviecultists.com/2009/11/09/10-famous-movies-that-are-total- ri poffs/


That's a better list than the one subby posted. Bonus points for mentioning Clonus/The Island. People always look at me funny when I tell them Michael Bay ripped off an MST3k movie.
 
2013-05-13 10:13:25 PM
I always chuckle when I see people claiming that Avatar is a rip-off of Dances With Wolves, or Pocahontas, or Ferngully.

It's clearly a rip-off of Dune. Think about it (for once): Foreign guy arrives on dangerous new world; has an accident that throws him in with the natives; he is accepted into their culture after proving his worth; falls in love with one of their females; joins them in their freedom fight; conjures up wild beasts to aid in the fight and is subsequently deified; drives off evil guys stealing their natural resources.

Doesn't sound like  Dances With Wolves, or Pocahontas, or Ferngully anymore, hmm?
 
2013-05-14 12:41:04 AM
There are 8 basic storylines. Everything we have ever enjoyed fits into one of these archetypes:

1) Rags to riches -- protagonist fulfills all dreams and desires (Cinderella)
2) Fatal flaw -- protagonist undone by weakness (Achilles)
3) Fate -- protagonist deals with destiny (Faust)
4) Triangle -- protagonist makes difficult choice (Tristan)
5) Nemesis -- protagonist versus unstoppable foe (Circe)
6) Boy Meets Girl -- protagonist falls in love, often forbidden (Romeo/Juliet)
7) The Fallen -- protagonist deprived of gifts or talents (Orpheus)
8) The Hero -- protagonist fights evil and saves the day (Superman)

And each of these plot archetypes can have seven different kinds of conflict:

1) man vs. nature
2) man vs. man
3) man vs. the environment
4) man vs. machines/technology
5) man vs. the supernatural
6) man vs. self
7) man vs. god/religion

And within these you can have three different types of endings:

1) Happy ending
2) Unhappy ending
3) Ambiguous or amoral ending (often bittersweet or conflict neutral)

So there you go. Every story you've ever read is encapsulated within a combination of these essential tropes.
 
2013-05-14 01:55:10 AM

mr_a: They missed the number one rip of all time.

Airplane! is taken, in some cases almost word-for-word, from a movie called Zero Hour. Unfortunately, Zero Hour was supposed to be a serious movie. After watching Airplane!, it is itself a comedy.


WELL, actually Airplane! was spoof of 70's disaster movies in general, most notably Airport.

Either way, it's not a ripoff of anything  it's a spoof, so by definition, it has to appear to be like the movies that it is spoofing.
 
2013-05-14 02:01:19 AM

unlikely: Yes yes, and The Lion King is a ripoff of Hamlet and Star Wars is a ripoff of the Hidden Fortress, we're all very impressed.

When I hear someone cry "X is a ripoff of Y" what I generally hear is "Look how hip I am for liking this story before it was cool."


Somebody showed me a video a few months ago, they were very excited about it, and kept pointing out how it had been shown at TED, so that must mean that it had street cred...

Anyway, the video was about how everything is inspired by something else, even if it's unintentional. Then I proceeded to watch 10 minutes or so of footage from the Kill Bill movies, and then the original movies that they were inspired by. The problem with this approach is that Tarantino starts out from the beginningtelling you that he is trying to emulate a certain type of movie. Of COURSE it's going to have direct parallels to existing movies(And of course in this case they were all Japanese movies). It was really a stupid video when the guy states from the start that he is setting out to prove your thesis before you've even formed it yourself.

As for this list, it's stupid, they can't even keep straight what one thing or another is a "ripoff" of, sometimes the movie is a "ripoff", although that movie is based on a book(Hunger Games), or it's a comic book...

Why doesn't this Cracked shiat get vetted better?" They actually DO have some good lists from time to time, unfortunately, it's the dregs that show up here almost every time.
 
2013-05-14 07:09:10 AM

doglover: When the Japanese movie was re-released for American audiences, they included a cheeky reference in the trailer, which almost makes it sound like The Hunger Games was a remake:

Hunger Games is sooooooo the crappy version of Battle Royale.


Thank you. I can't believe that POS got 85% at Rotten Tomatoes. It was one of the worst movies I've ever seen. Sometime around when the games started and the team of four was gallivanting around, laughing and killing people, I just shook my head and became acutely aware that I was watching a movie. I was like "You morons realize that you're eventually going to have to kill each other, right? Could these shiatty actors at least pretend to show some complexity here?"

BR depicted a much more realistic response of a bunch of children being put in a survival horror situation. There were rebellions, refusals to participate, suicides, people peeing their pants, and extremely clumsy attempts to whack at other children with melee weapons. HG acts like a bunch of teenagers would suddenly become hardened, fearless ninjas because you trained them for three days. And there were no discussions of the injustice of making 12 year old girls fight 18 year old men.

What that movie needed was for one character to be incredulous in order to lampshade as the voice of the viewer in that ridiculous world.
 
2013-05-14 07:13:29 AM

Ishkur: There are 8 basic storylines. Everything we have ever enjoyed fits into one of these archetypes:

1) Rags to riches -- protagonist fulfills all dreams and desires (Cinderella)
2) Fatal flaw -- protagonist undone by weakness (Achilles)
3) Fate -- protagonist deals with destiny (Faust)
4) Triangle -- protagonist makes difficult choice (Tristan)
5) Nemesis -- protagonist versus unstoppable foe (Circe)
6) Boy Meets Girl -- protagonist falls in love, often forbidden (Romeo/Juliet)
7) The Fallen -- protagonist deprived of gifts or talents (Orpheus)
8) The Hero -- protagonist fights evil and saves the day (Superman)

And each of these plot archetypes can have seven different kinds of conflict:

1) man vs. nature
2) man vs. man
3) man vs. the environment
4) man vs. machines/technology
5) man vs. the supernatural
6) man vs. self
7) man vs. god/religion

And within these you can have three different types of endings:

1) Happy ending
2) Unhappy ending
3) Ambiguous or amoral ending (often bittersweet or conflict neutral)

So there you go. Every story you've ever read is encapsulated within a combination of these essential tropes.


Ever read The Road by Cormac McCarthy? I can see man vs. the environment with an ambiguous ending, but I'd have trouble classifying it as any of the first 8. Really a lot of distopian novels have a similar quality, unless "the system" or "the world" qualifies as a nemesis.
 
2013-05-14 09:39:45 AM

Mikey1969: WELL, actually Airplane! was spoof of 70's disaster movies in general, most notably Airport.

Either way, it's not a ripoff of anything it's a spoof, so by definition, it has to appear to be like the movies that it is spoofing.


Actually, both are true. Airplane! was, indeed, a spoof of the 70s airline disaster movies. However, it *ALSO* was done so by essentially taking large portions of Zero Hour! and adding jokes; seriously, there are some exact dialog, scene-for-scene, and plot device copies between the two. So much so, that the only reason it was possible to do so without a slam-dunk lawsuit was that both were Paramount films.

Brief clip comparison: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dO90hdkeKrs
 
2013-05-14 10:16:41 AM

Tommy Moo: Ever read The Road by Cormac McCarthy? I can see man vs. the environment with an ambiguous ending, but I'd have trouble classifying it as any of the first 8. Really a lot of distopian novels have a similar quality, unless "the system" or "the world" qualifies as a nemesis.


What a terrible book.

Out of food?  Find apples
Out of water?  Find a cistern.
Exhausted?  Find an underground shelter to rest.

There must not have been anything else written that year for it to win a Pulitzer prize.
 
2013-05-14 11:44:37 AM

Broktun: Tommy Moo: Ever read The Road by Cormac McCarthy? I can see man vs. the environment with an ambiguous ending, but I'd have trouble classifying it as any of the first 8. Really a lot of distopian novels have a similar quality, unless "the system" or "the world" qualifies as a nemesis.

What a terrible book.

Out of food?  Find apples
Out of water?  Find a cistern.
Exhausted?  Find an underground shelter to rest.

There must not have been anything else written that year for it to win a Pulitzer prize.


The only thing about this book I enjoyed was the concept of drinking the last coke a cola in the world.

I only drink a coke about 1x a year and when I do, I go through the mental process of imagining its the last one ever.  Don't know why, but it makes it taste damn good.

/end csb
 
2013-05-14 11:46:27 AM

Ishkur: There are 8 basic storylines. Everything we have ever enjoyed fits into one of these archetypes:

1) Rags to riches -- protagonist fulfills all dreams and desires (Cinderella)
2) Fatal flaw -- protagonist undone by weakness (Achilles)
3) Fate -- protagonist deals with destiny (Faust)
4) Triangle -- protagonist makes difficult choice (Tristan)
5) Nemesis -- protagonist versus unstoppable foe (Circe)
6) Boy Meets Girl -- protagonist falls in love, often forbidden (Romeo/Juliet)
7) The Fallen -- protagonist deprived of gifts or talents (Orpheus)
8) The Hero -- protagonist fights evil and saves the day (Superman)

And each of these plot archetypes can have seven different kinds of conflict:

1) man vs. nature
2) man vs. man
3) man vs. the environment
4) man vs. machines/technology
5) man vs. the supernatural
6) man vs. self
7) man vs. god/religion

And within these you can have three different types of endings:

1) Happy ending
2) Unhappy ending
3) Ambiguous or amoral ending (often bittersweet or conflict neutral)

So there you go. Every story you've ever read is encapsulated within a combination of these essential tropes.


Kind of vague and general, aren't they?

"Hey, that story has a guy doing stuff! That's obvious ripoff of Gilgamesh!"
 
2013-05-14 12:55:16 PM

Broktun: Tommy Moo: Ever read The Road by Cormac McCarthy? I can see man vs. the environment with an ambiguous ending, but I'd have trouble classifying it as any of the first 8. Really a lot of distopian novels have a similar quality, unless "the system" or "the world" qualifies as a nemesis.

What a terrible book.

Out of food?  Find apples
Out of water?  Find a cistern.
Exhausted?  Find an underground shelter to rest.

There must not have been anything else written that year for it to win a Pulitzer prize.


Well, if you just look at the plot, there's not a whole lot going on. There's a lot of value in the relationship between the father and the boy, so the novel works as a piece on fatherhood. Where it really holds up well in my opinion is the language. It didn't matter what McCarthy was writing about; he just did such a masterful job of wordsmithing the world around him. It could have been about a father and son taking a trip to a grocery store and it would have been just as incredible of a book.
 
2013-05-14 12:57:59 PM
I mean... come on. Tell me this isn't one of the most moving, heart-stopping pieces of grief you've ever read:

"He walked out in the gray light and stood and he saw for a brief moment the absolute truth of the world. The cold relentless circling of the intestate earth. Darkness implacable. The blind dogs of the sun in their running. The crushing black vacuum of the universe. And somewhere two hunted animals trembling like ground-foxes in their cover. Borrowed time and borrowed world and borrowed eyes with which to sorrow it."
 
2013-05-14 01:50:32 PM

Tommy Moo: I mean... come on. Tell me this isn't one of the most moving, heart-stopping pieces of grief you've ever read:

"He walked out in the gray light and stood and he saw for a brief moment the absolute truth of the world. The cold relentless circling of the intestate earth. Darkness implacable. The blind dogs of the sun in their running. The crushing black vacuum of the universe. And somewhere two hunted animals trembling like ground-foxes in their cover. Borrowed time and borrowed world and borrowed eyes with which to sorrow it."


Only ironically?
 
2013-05-14 02:46:29 PM

Mugato: Ishkur: There are 8 basic storylines. Everything we have ever enjoyed fits into one of these archetypes:

1) Rags to riches -- protagonist fulfills all dreams and desires (Cinderella)
2) Fatal flaw -- protagonist undone by weakness (Achilles)
3) Fate -- protagonist deals with destiny (Faust)
4) Triangle -- protagonist makes difficult choice (Tristan)
5) Nemesis -- protagonist versus unstoppable foe (Circe)
6) Boy Meets Girl -- protagonist falls in love, often forbidden (Romeo/Juliet)
7) The Fallen -- protagonist deprived of gifts or talents (Orpheus)
8) The Hero -- protagonist fights evil and saves the day (Superman)

And each of these plot archetypes can have seven different kinds of conflict:

1) man vs. nature
2) man vs. man
3) man vs. the environment
4) man vs. machines/technology
5) man vs. the supernatural
6) man vs. self
7) man vs. god/religion

And within these you can have three different types of endings:

1) Happy ending
2) Unhappy ending
3) Ambiguous or amoral ending (often bittersweet or conflict neutral)

So there you go. Every story you've ever read is encapsulated within a combination of these essential tropes.

Kind of vague and general, aren't they?

"Hey, that story has a guy doing stuff! That's obvious ripoff of Gilgamesh!"


Well, when you boil everything down to nuts and bolts, yes, you only have about 168 story combinations. Unless someone can think of some other categories that don't outright fit into any of the others, and then it would expand the selection a bit. But you start defining the stories with details, and they do become different. You can have a Romeo and Juliet story in a dystopian future, or hundreds of years ago in the arabian desert, or in old tyme England, and the writing style, characters, dialog, and solutions are going to change how the story gets from beginning to end. Strip all that away and you're still left with Boy Meets Girl vs Environment (society at large or the opposing families) and a unhappy ending.
 
2013-05-14 03:47:07 PM

Mugato: Arkanaut: Not sure if trolling, but I saw Battle Royale, and I've seen bits and pieces of Hunger Games.  HG has a much more extensive backstory and characterization.  There's much more material about the world that the characters live in -- for example, America being transformed into a resource-extraction state with widening wealth and income disparity -- that isn't there in BR, which plays out like a high school drama.  Certainly they're conceptually similar -- the core of HG being, in fact, a battle royale -- and it looks like HG borrowed some details, but Battle Royale is a much simpler story.

But it's a foreign film, which automatically makes it better. For some reason.


We covered this is in my film classes years ago... The reason that foreign films seems to be so superior is probably the same thing people see in foreign countries. They don't bother to ship their dreck off for screening in America. Why would they? They ship out their best(For the most part), and keep the garbage at home. As a result, we get the better films, and people think that it means that ALL foreign films are better. Makes perfect sense, but skews everyone's perspective...
 
2013-05-14 06:01:51 PM

unlikely: Yes yes, and The Lion King is a ripoff of Hamlet and Star Wars is a ripoff of the Hidden Fortress, we're all very impressed.

When I hear someone cry "X is a ripoff of Y" what I generally hear is "Look how hip I am for liking this story before it was cool."


What I hear is "I know all about plot, but nothing about story."
 
2013-05-14 06:01:57 PM

Mikey1969: Mugato: Arkanaut: Not sure if trolling, but I saw Battle Royale, and I've seen bits and pieces of Hunger Games.  HG has a much more extensive backstory and characterization.  There's much more material about the world that the characters live in -- for example, America being transformed into a resource-extraction state with widening wealth and income disparity -- that isn't there in BR, which plays out like a high school drama.  Certainly they're conceptually similar -- the core of HG being, in fact, a battle royale -- and it looks like HG borrowed some details, but Battle Royale is a much simpler story.

But it's a foreign film, which automatically makes it better. For some reason.

We covered this is in my film classes years ago... The reason that foreign films seems to be so superior is probably the same thing people see in foreign countries. They don't bother to ship their dreck off for screening in America. Why would they? They ship out their best(For the most part), and keep the garbage at home. As a result, we get the better films, and people think that it means that ALL foreign films are better. Makes perfect sense, but skews everyone's perspective...


fark, you could write a book on that alone. different countries/cultures keeping their worst local while the blockbusters go universal. what was a flop in one country may be heralded as genius elsewhere. Jerry Lewsi was zany fun but he wasn't a frickin' comedic genius, for example.
 
2013-05-14 06:48:24 PM

Some 'Splainin' To Do: unlikely: Yes yes, and The Lion King is a ripoff of Hamlet and Star Wars is a ripoff of the Hidden Fortress, we're all very impressed.

When I hear someone cry "X is a ripoff of Y" what I generally hear is "Look how hip I am for liking this story before it was cool."

What I hear is "I know all about plot, but nothing about story."


If you weren't already TF I'd have sponsored you just now.
 
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