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(Stuff.co.nz)   Did you fly into London on Afriqiyah Airways in 2010? Well, meet your pilot   (stuff.co.nz) divider line 33
    More: Followup, Afriqiyah Airways, London Airport, Airbus A320, national carrier, Hampshire Police, Gatwick Airport, Winchester Crown Court  
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5827 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 May 2013 at 3:33 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-05-13 03:01:08 AM  
in before "Catch Me If You Can"
 
2013-05-13 04:16:02 AM  
"Fake pilot" no, "uncertified pilot".  He seemed to be doing alright.
 
2013-05-13 05:19:55 AM  
He knew how to fly the plane. I think I'd be more afraid of the fact that it was an African airline. Not exactly Qantas.
 
2013-05-13 06:29:20 AM  
I-fuq-ya airlines ?
 
2013-05-13 06:35:34 AM  
When I fly "I-Freak-Ya" Airlines, I expect my pilot to look like this:

3.bp.blogspot.com

Or this:

cdn2.screenjunkies.com

"This is ya' captain speaking - welcome aboard flight 069 from the 310 to the 212. It's time to bust this coney y'all. In a hot second, I'll be hittin' them switches and gettin' this biatch pumpin' and jumpin'. So screw your sh*t on tight and enjoy the flight."
 
2013-05-13 06:38:39 AM  
Meh. He was an Air Force pilot. He was probably qualified. Unlicensed but qualified.
 
2013-05-13 07:19:29 AM  
The British get so uptight for forms and paperwork.
 
2013-05-13 07:58:24 AM  

rev. dave: The British get so uptight for forms and paperwork.


Nanny state.
 
2013-05-13 08:48:23 AM  

SolomonKing: When I fly "I-Freak-Ya" Airlines, I expect my pilot to look like this:

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 338x403]

Or this:

[cdn2.screenjunkies.com image 339x479]

"This is ya' captain speaking - welcome aboard flight 069 from the 310 to the 212. It's time to bust this coney y'all. In a hot second, I'll be hittin' them switches and gettin' this biatch pumpin' and jumpin'. So screw your sh*t on tight and enjoy the flight."


I expect:

farm6.staticflickr.com
 
2013-05-13 09:16:59 AM  
Not the first time an American named Michael Fay got his 15 minutes in an international kerfuffle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_P._Fay

Hope this one doesn't get his ass beat.
 
2013-05-13 09:26:32 AM  
Given that this guy flew for the air force and actually landed at Gatwick several times., he likely was a fine, yet un-certified, pilot.  It also does not seem to be his skills that outed him, but rather some chatter on a message board.  My main concern would be the lack of a medical certificate.  He could have severe diabetes or a heart condition that would have left him incapacitated in some form while flying.
 
2013-05-13 09:54:59 AM  
He was probably Libya's best-trained pilot.
 
2013-05-13 10:18:36 AM  
ObSpeedbird:

Speedbird 206: "Good morning Frankfurt, Speedbird 206 clear of the active."
Ground: "Good Morning, taxi to your gate." The British Airways 747 pulls onto the main taxiway and stops.
Ground: "Speedbird, do you not know where you are going?"
Speedbird 206: "Stand by, ground, I'm looking up the gate location now."
Ground (impatiently): "Speedbird 206, have you never flown to Frankfurt before?"
Speedbird 206 (coolly): "Yes, in 1944. But I didn't stop".
 
2013-05-13 10:24:10 AM  

stuhayes2010: SolomonKing: When I fly "I-Freak-Ya" Airlines, I expect my pilot to look like this:

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 338x403]

Or this:

[cdn2.screenjunkies.com image 339x479]

"This is ya' captain speaking - welcome aboard flight 069 from the 310 to the 212. It's time to bust this coney y'all. In a hot second, I'll be hittin' them switches and gettin' this biatch pumpin' and jumpin'. So screw your sh*t on tight and enjoy the flight."

I expect:

[farm6.staticflickr.com image 425x640]


Thanks.  I needed a new keyboard anyway.
 
2013-05-13 10:56:32 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-13 11:23:58 AM  

wingnut396: Given that this guy flew for the air force and actually landed at Gatwick several times., he likely was a fine, yet un-certified, pilot.  It also does not seem to be his skills that outed him, but rather some chatter on a message board.  My main concern would be the lack of a medical certificate.  He could have severe diabetes or a heart condition that would have left him incapacitated in some form while flying.


Pretty much this. It doesn't say what this guy flew in the Air Force, but if it was anything like a KC-315, C-17, C-141...pretty much anything in the AF inventory that isn't a fighter, he probably wouldn't have much trouble with an A-320, which makes me wonder why he wasn't able to get a FAA ATP license when he got out. I'm not sure of how the process works, but from what I hear it isn't all that difficult if you have a fair amount of time in cargo jets.
 
2013-05-13 11:25:31 AM  

buzzcut73:

Pretty much this. It doesn't say what this guy flew in the Air Force, but if it was anything like a KC-315 KC-135, C-17, C-141...pretty much anything in the AF inventory that isn't a fighter, he probably wouldn't have much trouble with an A-320, which makes me wonder why he wasn't able to get a FAA ATP license when he got out. I'm not sure of how the process works, but from what I hear it isn't all that difficult if you have a fair amount of time in cargo jets.


Dammit. Preview is your friend.
 
2013-05-13 11:42:25 AM  

buzzcut73: buzzcut73:

Pretty much this. It doesn't say what this guy flew in the Air Force, but if it was anything like a KC-315 KC-135, C-17, C-141...pretty much anything in the AF inventory that isn't a fighter, he probably wouldn't have much trouble with an A-320, which makes me wonder why he wasn't able to get a FAA ATP license when he got out. I'm not sure of how the process works, but from what I hear it isn't all that difficult if you have a fair amount of time in cargo jets.

Dammit. Preview is your friend.


He might have managed a shaitty discharge from the Air Force.  Showed up drunk on the flight line, or got himself grounded for safety violations.  They probably wouldn't have given him an ATP license if that happened.  Or he busted his flight physical.  He forged that too.  An ATP requires a Class I medical certificate, and those are a little harder to get than a Class III or II.  He might have a bad hart or something.
 
2013-05-13 11:57:16 AM  

devildog123: buzzcut73: buzzcut73:

Pretty much this. It doesn't say what this guy flew in the Air Force, but if it was anything like a KC-315 KC-135, C-17, C-141...pretty much anything in the AF inventory that isn't a fighter, he probably wouldn't have much trouble with an A-320, which makes me wonder why he wasn't able to get a FAA ATP license when he got out. I'm not sure of how the process works, but from what I hear it isn't all that difficult if you have a fair amount of time in cargo jets.

Dammit. Preview is your friend.

He might have managed a shaitty discharge from the Air Force.  Showed up drunk on the flight line, or got himself grounded for safety violations.  They probably wouldn't have given him an ATP license if that happened.  Or he busted his flight physical.  He forged that too.  An ATP requires a Class I medical certificate, and those are a little harder to get than a Class III or II.  He might have a bad hart or something.


He lives in England, which requires a different license. He very well could have his ATP, just not the JA (what Europe uses) equivilent.
 
2013-05-13 01:28:54 PM  
As long as the flights were on time, right?
 
2013-05-13 01:30:14 PM  
 
2013-05-13 01:56:43 PM  

RoyBatty: ObSpeedbird:

Speedbird 206: "Good morning Frankfurt, Speedbird 206 clear of the active."
Ground: "Good Morning, taxi to your gate." The British Airways 747 pulls onto the main taxiway and stops.
Ground: "Speedbird, do you not know where you are going?"
Speedbird 206: "Stand by, ground, I'm looking up the gate location now."
Ground (impatiently): "Speedbird 206, have you never flown to Frankfurt before?"
Speedbird 206 (coolly): "Yes, in 1944. But I didn't stop".


Japan 1: Herro tower, request approach to Pearl Harbor.
Tower: Say again Japan 1? Request approach to where?
Japan 1: Uhrr, Japan 1 requests approach to, uhr... Pearl Harbor.
Tower (stifling laughter): Uhh, Japan 1, are you sure you want an approach vector to a harbor?
Japan 1: Negative tower..
Tower: Well, how can we help you?
Japan 1: ...  So sorry Tower... can'tu say 'Honoruru'!

/true story
 
2013-05-13 02:15:56 PM  

buzzcut73: Pretty much this. It doesn't say what this guy flew in the Air Force, but if it was anything like a KC-315, C-17, C-141...pretty much anything in the AF inventory that isn't a fighter, he probably wouldn't have much trouble with an A-320, which makes me wonder why he wasn't able to get a FAA ATP license when he got out. I'm not sure of how the process works, but from what I hear it isn't all that difficult if you have a fair amount of time in cargo jets.


I would suggest that while the flight dynamics would be similar, the use of a side-stick on the Airbus versus the yolk on a Boeing would require some... adjustment. A bit analogous to driving stick in Britain when you're American - the first time you smack your right hand off the door when you're trying to shift you learn quickly to use your left hand.

Flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.
 
2013-05-13 03:21:37 PM  

RoyBatty: ObSpeedbird:

Speedbird 206: "Good morning Frankfurt, Speedbird 206 clear of the active."
Ground: "Good Morning, taxi to your gate." The British Airways 747 pulls onto the main taxiway and stops.
Ground: "Speedbird, do you not know where you are going?"
Speedbird 206: "Stand by, ground, I'm looking up the gate location now."
Ground (impatiently): "Speedbird 206, have you never flown to Frankfurt before?"
Speedbird 206 (coolly): "Yes, in 1944. But I didn't stop".


Old joke is really really old.
There are no pilots who were qualified to fly in 1944 who are not now too old to fly a commercial jet.
 
2013-05-13 03:26:59 PM  

slykens1: A bit analogous to driving stick in Britain when you're American - the first time you smack your right hand off the door when you're trying to shift you learn quickly to use your left hand.


Actually, speaking of British vs American -- what about the units? I imagine they use meters in Libya.  He'd probably have to get used to translating MPH into KPH, feet into meters, etc.  If he's getting too little sleep and tries to slow down too much for landing, that could be potentially disastrous.
 
2013-05-13 03:41:03 PM  
How hard could it be?

www.dilbert.com
 
2013-05-13 03:59:17 PM  

Arkanaut: Actually, speaking of British vs American -- what about the units? I imagine they use meters in Libya.  He'd probably have to get used to translating MPH into KPH, feet into meters, etc.  If he's getting too little sleep and tries to slow down too much for landing, that could be potentially disastrous.


A320 being glass cockpit and all has the ability to switch between units being displayed easily. One must also think in those units but that would be a lot easier when you're immersed in that environment. Tripoli-Gatwick likely overflies France which, from what I've found, uses feet for commercial aviation - and I would guess Libya does/did too. You would be surprised which countries use feet versus meters - looks like it's primarily the old Soviet bloc and China with a few others in metric.

CokeBear: There are no pilots who were qualified to fly in 1944 who are not now too old to fly a commercial jet.


The joke is usually dated 1974 or thereabouts and the punchline was, "Yes, once, in 1944, in a different kind of Boeing. We didn't stop." This is why it's mentioned that it is a BA 747 in Frankfurt which probably wasn't really flown there.

This is usually accompanied by the joke about the German aircraft requesting clearance in German, being told to speak English, then complains about being a German pilot in a German plane at a German airport - why does he have to speak English? To which, in perfect British the radio says, "Because you lost the bloody war!"

What is most interesting about this case is that it appears that the Libyan airline made no effort to authenticate or confirm his credentials. We weren't on poor terms with the Libyans in 2010 - I'm sure the FAA would have told them whether they were real or not. And wouldn't he have to have faked a work record, type certification, etc, as well which were not checked?
 
2013-05-13 04:01:54 PM  

Arkanaut: slykens1: A bit analogous to driving stick in Britain when you're American - the first time you smack your right hand off the door when you're trying to shift you learn quickly to use your left hand.

Actually, speaking of British vs American -- what about the units? I imagine they use meters in Libya.  He'd probably have to get used to translating MPH into KPH, feet into meters, etc.  If he's getting too little sleep and tries to slow down too much for landing, that could be potentially disastrous.


The military will generally use the metric system on every level, but especially so with well-trained people like pilots.
 
2013-05-13 04:24:52 PM  

slykens1: Tripoli-Gatwick likely overflies France which, from what I've found, uses feet for commercial aviation - and I would guess Libya does/did too. You would be surprised which countries use feet versus meters - looks like it's primarily the old Soviet bloc and China with a few others in metric.


Lunchlady: The military will generally use the metric system on every level


I learned something today.  Thanks guys!
 
2013-05-13 04:38:32 PM  

Lunchlady: The military will generally use the metric system on every level, but especially so with well-trained people like pilots.


Apparently our military needs to work with people from other countries at times.

This ain't Uhh Murica any more.
 
2013-05-13 04:56:29 PM  

ko_kyi: Lunchlady: The military will generally use the metric system on every level, but especially so with well-trained people like pilots.

Apparently our military needs to work with people from other countries at times.

This ain't Uhh Murica any more.


This reminds me of the time that FLYNAVY (I think it was) got owned here on Fark.  I wonder if this pilot has a Fark tag?
 
2013-05-13 06:16:11 PM  

stuhayes2010: I expect:


A South American?  Strange.
 
2013-05-13 09:00:46 PM  

lewismarktwo: "Fake pilot" no, "uncertified pilot".  He seemed to be doing alright.


This. I was all "How in the holy hell did he successfully...oh, he's actually a pilot. Well that helps."

I still want commercial pilots to be properly certified, and hopefully they catch him, but I've lost my outrage. It's around here somewhere, I think. *pats pockets, looks around*
 
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