If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Phys Org2)   "Sitting around for eight hours waiting for your (Nissan) Leaf to charge up is not exactly a selling point. EVs have a sitting-on-your-ass factor that conventional cars do not"   (phys.org) divider line 6
    More: Fail, conventional car, J.D. Power, Center for Automotive Research, Rebecca Lindland, Fisker Automotive, plug-in electric car, Sergio Marchionne, government-backed loan  
•       •       •

3192 clicks; posted to Business » on 12 May 2013 at 10:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-05-12 02:09:36 PM
1 votes:
2 years ago, if you said you were buying an electric car, people would mostly laugh at you.
Now, some people laugh but many ask questions, as they are starting to enter the mainstream.
5 years from now electric will be a standard choice and will have a fair share of the market.
15 years from now almost nobody will make or sell internal combustion vehicles.
2013-05-12 11:25:45 AM
1 votes:

sammyk: born_yesterday: sammyk: The sweet spot for electric cars is the daily commuter. The Tesla model s has a 300 mile range. That is enough for the longest daily commute most could imagine with power to spare. Plug it in when you get home and its fully charged in the morning. Most families have more than one car as well. So you have a car that runs on gas for the long trips. Or rent one.

While I fully support the development of this technology, I would hate to find myself with a car low on charge and in the middle of an emergency that shuts down the power grid (especially for an extended period).

You really think our power system is so unreliable that you would have an issue like that? Something like an ice storm or hurricane would give you advance warning. You would have time to make sure its fully charged.


You weren't affected by the blackout of 2003 I guess.  No warning, the lights just went off and stayed off for several days (depending on where you lived).  Gas cars didn't fare any better though when the power to pumps went out.

That being said, it's easy enough to put solar panels up to charge up an EV if you're worried about the inevitable zombie apocalypse.  It's pretty hard to set up a oil well and refinery in your backyard without the neighbours complaining.
2013-05-12 11:21:43 AM
1 votes:

pivazena: Not that I'm going to tell you how to live your life,but if you work from home and wife has an 80-mile commute, isn't it the more environmentally friendly thing to move closer to where she works?


yeah yeah yeah, we are house hunting closer to her work.
2013-05-12 11:12:48 AM
1 votes:
Pure electric is pretty awesome, right up until someone figures out how to compress hydrogen/gets a methanol fuel cell working/etc in an economical fashion.   After which the hydrogen fuel cell will pretty much destroy both gas and electric.  DMFCs are already starting to take off in some areas like forklifts.

The battery will always be a limiting factor in that you need to sit on your ass, swap batteries, or supercharge.  You can mitigate the pain in the ass with technology, but it still remains.  That said there are many electric cars on the road that mitigate those factors through a supercharger or having a backup gasoline engine, etc.

The big problem electric cars face is no one has really been able to get a mass market electric car out the door.  You either pay a premium with the MSRP for a long range vehicle or you pay a premium in your time due to limited range and recharge needs.  Which is fine, but it limits the electric vehicle to being a vehicle sought after by people whose values align with the product, just like how performance nuts only buy Corvettes, Mustangs, Challengers, etc.  The big question of course is will we see such a car or will fuel cells mature first.
2013-05-12 11:04:58 AM
1 votes:
I drive about one hour a day. Rest of the time Car sits pretty much next to a electric socket. So eight hours doesn't sound too bad. Too bad it runs on gasoline and seems to like it a lot.
2013-05-12 10:48:53 AM
1 votes:
Everytime I hear some car 'expert' complain about the charge times for electrics I have to wonder if it isn't being written at Exxon HQ. It's just a BS argument and everyone should know better.

The sweet spot for electric cars is the daily commuter. The Tesla model s has a 300 mile range. That is enough for the longest daily commute most could imagine with power to spare. Plug it in when you get home and its fully charged in the morning. Most families have more than one car as well. So you have a car that runs on gas for the long trips. Or rent one.

In my case I work from home. So I get to keep my gas guzzling mid life crisis car. But the wife has an 80 mile plus commute everyday. We are seriously considering electric for her next daily commuter. If it's something that has a 300 mile range she is good to go every single day. That still leaves us with in range of the beach and mountains. As long as I have electricity on the other side I am good. In fact the only trip we do that would probably not work is the 500 mile trip we take once in a while to see her parents.

In short, no I will not be sitting around watching the car charge. It would have a full charge everytime I leave the driveway. If my destination is not in range I'm taking the hotrod.
 
Displayed 6 of 6 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report