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(Huffington Post)   A detailed map showing the regional American and Canadian dialects; doesn't explain why the rain in Spain stays mainly on the plain   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 135
    More: Interesting, Americans, U.S., dialects, Spain, Canadians, digital audio, gospel musics  
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17955 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 May 2013 at 11:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-12 07:05:19 AM

raerae1980: FTA:  Pennsylvania is the most linguistically complex state in the country.

WHO HOO!!!    From Pittsburgh and this makes me proud.  Had a linguistic professor once pinpoint my origins from one sentence: The rose bush needs pruned.

/old CSS


I have the luxury of having grown up and gone to school across PA. I grew up with PA Dutch Grandparents, and near Amish country, so I experienced the PA Dutch linguistic influences a lot. Now I live in Pittsburgh, which also has its own unique regional pocket - within the Allegheney Midland pocket - Within the midlands! Very interesting place. Need a little time in the north-east of the state to round it out.
 
2013-05-12 07:52:49 AM
No wonder everyone has to ask me where I'm from.  Now I'll just say 'generally American.'
 
2013-05-12 08:20:34 AM

durbnpoisn: I've seen people from Georgia that sounded like the anchor on the local news, as much as I've seen a white dude from the suburbs speaking like Charles Ramsey.
I am not exactly sure how any region enters into it.  I think it almost comes down to the street you live on and the people you hang out with.

All I can say for certain is that, the more lazy a person is with their dialect, the more likely they are to be poor, stupid, and unmotivated.

"Can I axe yu a qestion?"

Seriously...  Pull it together, man!


That kind of thinking is exactly why Clarence Thomas never says anything.
You're underestimating a whole lotta peeps, bud.
 
2013-05-12 08:45:06 AM
xelnia: No data on Hawaii, apparently...

Ho whatchu fokka?  Like see wallet.  Search take, braddah, search take.

/Fokking haoles
 
2013-05-12 08:45:51 AM
durbnpoisn: I've seen people from Georgia that sounded like the anchor on the local news, as much as I've seen a white dude from the suburbs speaking like Charles Ramsey.
I am not exactly sure how any region enters into it.  I think it almost comes down to the street you live on and the people you hang out with.

All I can say for certain is that, the more lazy a person is with their dialect, the more likely they are to be poor, stupid, and unmotivated.

"Can I axe yu a qestion?"

Seriously...  Pull it together, man!


Well I can say that In Knoxville ones age has a lot to do with it. Most people born prior to about the time I was in elementry school have the Inland southern accent we are shown in on the map as would the out in the sticks areas that we are the nearest city to, but the whippersnappers born after about the time I was in elementry school and from Knoxville and not some boonie neighboring county have an accent more typical of someone from Michigan or Ohio because they out number people born and raised here natives.
 
2013-05-12 09:04:14 AM

Fano: meyerkev: I find it absolutely hilarious that San Francisco has a midwestern accent.

/Of course, given that everyone here seems to have followed: Grew up in Midwest -> Lived in shiatty apartment in the Valley to avoid commute -> got married and bought house in East Bay (and then biatch about the 880 commute because there is no mass transit between the East Bay and the Valley, and there's only 1 freeway), I can't say I'm surprised.
//And the natives seem to have all said: "Fark this, I'm moving somewhere cheaper because a nice 2 BR, 2 BA house is 1.3 million CASH."

Richmond, VA has some weird pocket where people say "aboot," and "soorry"


That's the Middle Peninsula/Northern Neck accent trickling down Rt 360. I've known 2 people that grew up around Tappahannock and they both pronounced house as "hoose".

I have a cousin named Donald who goes by Don. He's married to a Dawn.
 
2013-05-12 09:14:25 AM

TheVeryDeadIanMartin: Map fails without Ottawa Valley regional accent.


If they spoke English they would have been included...

Joking...
 
2013-05-12 09:18:04 AM
The map kind of fails to show the linguistic diversity of the Maritime provinces. Anyone can tell a Cape Bretoner does not sound the same as a mainlander. Also, NS has a big region that's predominantly French speaking along the Bay of Fundy.

Newfoundland looks about right, except the accent shouldn't be the same colour as the rest ofr Atlantic Canada.  Anyone raised outside of the Avalon penninsula is nigh on impossible to understand.

To those who've never heard the rural Newfoundland outport accent, think of two Irish twins who made up their own  language from early childhood, are still speaking it as adults, but have been drinking since before noon.
 
2013-05-12 09:26:11 AM

schatz: I was born & raised in MI, but never did get into 'Meijers' - I just say 'Meijer' - never understood why people add the 's. People here also say 'Barnes & Nobles' which drives me crazy.


The store was named "Meijer's" up until the 1960s.

http://www3.meijer.com/historytimeline/timeline.html
See the photos from 1946, 1949, 1960, and 1963
 
2013-05-12 09:34:32 AM

Kurohone: Holy crap that's cool.

Interesting to me personally is how he even took the time to catch some of the First Nations boundaries.  I used to live up in Northern Saskatchewan, and the level of detail in the La Loche / Buffalo Narrows area is remarkable...these are tiny little communities of 200-3000 people, but he's accurately placed the line of demarcation between predominantly Denesuline and English speaking areas...I'm thinking either his missionary work or his hobbies have taken him up into that part of the world frequently...


e'er sick cuz neh?
 
2013-05-12 09:37:24 AM

WhippingBoy: So... "soda"... "pop"... or "coke"?


Tonic.
 
2013-05-12 09:55:03 AM

TeamEd: Any map that says all of English Canada West of Quebec has the same dialect is wrong.

/Mind you, I've drank a lot tonight and I may not be getting the difference between accents and dialects in this case...


Agreed, and that's the first place I looked.  He's painting things with an awfully broad brush in large parts of North America.
 
2013-05-12 10:05:30 AM

literaldeluxe: schatz: I was born & raised in MI, but never did get into 'Meijers' - I just say 'Meijer' - never understood why people add the 's. People here also say 'Barnes & Nobles' which drives me crazy.

The store was named "Meijer's" up until the 1960s.

http://www3.meijer.com/historytimeline/timeline.html
See the photos from 1946, 1949, 1960, and 1963


The MIchigan accent is hilarious - I teach at a west MI college and some of my students have the most nasal ways of saying things I have ever heard. Key words are things like "salad" which is pronounced more like "seeealad" or Allendale which is pronounced "eeeeeellendale." To me it sounds like the screeching of nails on a chalkboard, and sadly it is much stronger in women than men - lots of hot women here, but the accent just kills it. Of course I'm from Ontario originally so my students tell me I say "huuse" and "ruuf" which is total bullshiat...
 
2013-05-12 10:13:46 AM

Gortex: To those who've never heard the rural Newfoundland outport accent, think of two Irish twins who made up their own  language from early childhood, are still speaking it as adults, but have been drinking since before noon.


I'm from rural outport Newfoundland, and I find it very difficult to understand most Avalon dialects. The accent of the older outport generation may be difficult for outsiders to understand, but young people these days sound more and more like the people they hear on American TV. Many of them are also very self-conscious about they way they speak because of the negative "dumb newfie" stigma. It's actually kind of a shame.
 
2013-05-12 10:14:33 AM

attila the hun's space age techno-babble: literaldeluxe: schatz: I was born & raised in MI, but never did get into 'Meijers' - I just say 'Meijer' - never understood why people add the 's. People here also say 'Barnes & Nobles' which drives me crazy.

The store was named "Meijer's" up until the 1960s.

http://www3.meijer.com/historytimeline/timeline.html
See the photos from 1946, 1949, 1960, and 1963

The MIchigan accent is hilarious - I teach at a west MI college and some of my students have the most nasal ways of saying things I have ever heard. Key words are things like "salad" which is pronounced more like "seeealad" or Allendale which is pronounced "eeeeeellendale." To me it sounds like the screeching of nails on a chalkboard, and sadly it is much stronger in women than men - lots of hot women here, but the accent just kills it. Of course I'm from Ontario originally so my students tell me I say "huuse" and "ruuf" which is total bullshiat...


I'll just leave this here: women who say 'sax' when they mean 'sex'.
 
2013-05-12 11:06:15 AM

diaphoresis: RangerTaylor: I'm glad to be vindicated.  When I spent a few years in New Orleans, I insisted to people that they had a NY accent, and everyone looked at me weird.

Ha!

I am invincible!


I beg to differ...

[basementrejects.com image 600x311]


You are officially awarded 10 points for catching the reference.
 
2013-05-12 11:34:17 AM

attila the hun's space age techno-babble: literaldeluxe: schatz: I was born & raised in MI, but never did get into 'Meijers' - I just say 'Meijer' - never understood why people add the 's. People here also say 'Barnes & Nobles' which drives me crazy.

The store was named "Meijer's" up until the 1960s.

http://www3.meijer.com/historytimeline/timeline.html
See the photos from 1946, 1949, 1960, and 1963

The MIchigan accent is hilarious - I teach at a west MI college and some of my students have the most nasal ways of saying things I have ever heard. Key words are things like "salad" which is pronounced more like "seeealad" or Allendale which is pronounced "eeeeeellendale." To me it sounds like the screeching of nails on a chalkboard, and sadly it is much stronger in women than men - lots of hot women here, but the accent just kills it. Of course I'm from Ontario originally so my students tell me I say "huuse" and "ruuf" which is total bullshiat...


Ruuf is right but house is ha-owse or a-bowwt
 
2013-05-12 12:37:53 PM

TheVeryDeadIanMartin: Map fails without Ottawa Valley regional accent.


This. Not to mention regional accents across the country. Even Toronto has its own accent, which you don't hear much because most people in Toronto are not from Toronto.

He also fails on the Quebec side. Even a "maudit anglais" like myself can hear the difference in accents between the local Outaouais and somebody from other parts of Quebec.
 
2013-05-12 12:49:22 PM

attila the hun's space age techno-babble: literaldeluxe: schatz: I was born & raised in MI, but never did get into 'Meijers' - I just say 'Meijer' - never understood why people add the 's. People here also say 'Barnes & Nobles' which drives me crazy.

The store was named "Meijer's" up until the 1960s.

http://www3.meijer.com/historytimeline/timeline.html
See the photos from 1946, 1949, 1960, and 1963

The MIchigan accent is hilarious - I teach at a west MI college and some of my students have the most nasal ways of saying things I have ever heard. Key words are things like "salad" which is pronounced more like "seeealad" or Allendale which is pronounced "eeeeeellendale." To me it sounds like the screeching of nails on a chalkboard, and sadly it is much stronger in women than men - lots of hot women here, but the accent just kills it. Of course I'm from Ontario originally so my students tell me I say "huuse" and "ruuf" which is total bullshiat...


West Michigan is a bit different than SE, apparently.  Other than "crayon" and "aunt" (cran / ant, I guess?  We make them both one syllable in any case.) I've never heard any out of state folks really think I had any sort of accent at all.

Talked about this with a coworker from Indiana last night who said the map confirmed to him how glad he was to have gotten the f--k out of Indiana.

I do love how Canada is just "Canada" and "French Speaking Area".  Really? Couldn't map out Newfoundland even, just for fun?

/nevermind, I guess the maritimes are kinda circled
 
2013-05-12 12:51:28 PM

WhippingBoy: So... "soda"... "pop"... or "coke"?


www.popvssoda.com /POP 4 EVA
 
2013-05-12 12:52:53 PM

literaldeluxe: schatz: I was born & raised in MI, but never did get into 'Meijers' - I just say 'Meijer' - never understood why people add the 's. People here also say 'Barnes & Nobles' which drives me crazy.

The store was named "Meijer's" up until the 1960s.

http://www3.meijer.com/historytimeline/timeline.html
See the photos from 1946, 1949, 1960, and 1963


This will give me much ammunition the next time the SO makes fun of me for saying Meijer's, and I thank you for that immensely.
 
2013-05-12 01:19:55 PM
NE PA definitely has it's own dialect in certain pockets of old coal country:  http://www.coalregion.com/speak/speaka.php
 
2013-05-12 01:54:59 PM
Lived most of my life in Southern California but lived for a while in the Seattle area. While the accent is very similar, Washingtonians told me that we talked faster than they did.
 
2013-05-12 02:03:52 PM

attila the hun's space age techno-babble: The MIchigan accent is hilarious - I teach at a west MI college and some of my students have the most nasal ways of saying things I have ever heard. Key words are things like "salad" which is pronounced more like "seeealad" or Allendale which is pronounced "eeeeeellendale." To me it sounds like the screeching of nails on a chalkboard, and sadly it is much stronger in women than men - lots of hot women here, but the accent just kills it. Of course I'm from Ontario originally so my students tell me I say "huuse" and "ruuf" which is total bullshiat...


I was born and raised in Michigan, and I still find the nasal vocal tendencies of many women here to be absolutely unappealing. Thankfully, my girl does not have that kind of voice or accent.

However, thanks to our proximity to Canada, I grew up with a tendency to say "book", "look", and "about" with something just short of a long "oo" sound. It's not highly pronounced, but it's there. I'd bet your students also do it, but since we don't do it as deeply as you, they notice it when you do it.

This Michigan pronunciation guide (http://www.michigannative.com/ma_pronunciations.shtml) is pretty accurate, though it tends to jump around from rural/lower class dialect to middle class dialect. I hate to phrase it that way, but there's no arguing that some lower class (or perhaps just less-intelligent) folks don't enunciate and tend to use more slang and bad pronunciations.

For example, I would never say "drownded" (drowned) or "ashfault" (asphalt).

 However, sometimes I catch myself eating a "sandwidj" (sandwich) but others I know eat a "samridge" and "warsh the deshes" after dinner.
 
2013-05-12 02:44:21 PM

TeamEd: Any map that says all of English Canada West of Quebec has the same dialect is wrong.

/Mind you, I've drank a lot tonight and I may not be getting the difference between accents and dialects in this case...


Yeah, the whole west for America ignores alot of variations as well..
 
2013-05-12 02:54:25 PM

MurphyMurphy: Everyone has a dialect. That said, the most accent neutral places I've seen in the many I've lived are MI and PA.

Now, there are areas in each state where groups do have very distinguishable accents. However areas like Harrisburg, Scranton and Erie, PA seem to have no distinct accent. I've seen the same in the nicer lake communities of western lower-peninsula MI.

I'm sure there are a lot of areas like this. In fact I think I'd find a map of the more "correctly spoken" regions more interesting vs one of all the different accents.


http://www.youtube.com/w atch?v=0Zh-cjOMv2w

sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-05-12 03:31:38 PM
Useless. Yet another website that doesn't let you resize the image on a mobile to actually see it bigger that teeny tiny. When are these web designers going to realize they need to check how this stuff works on mobile platforms?
 
2013-05-12 06:23:12 PM

I Like Bread: So where do I go to get a nice tall glass of wooder?


Was just having this argument with my kids. YOU CAN'T DRINK WOOD, DANGIT!

\Eastern Los Angeles suburban transplant to Philadelphia (First SW suburbs now NE suburbs)
 
2013-05-12 06:39:52 PM
When I was in Boston, I seldom heard the accents stereotypically associated with it.
 
2013-05-12 06:47:23 PM

Unhip1: When I was in Boston, I seldom heard the accents stereotypically associated with it.


Store clerks and bus drivers.  When I lived there, the educated folks (who had moved to Boston) were "American Normal", the lifelong southies were stereotypical Boston to some extent.
 
2013-05-12 07:35:01 PM

meyerkev: Unhip1: When I was in Boston, I seldom heard the accents stereotypically associated with it.

Store clerks and bus drivers.  When I lived there, the educated folks (who had moved to Boston) were "American Normal", the lifelong southies were stereotypical Boston to some extent.


So people in Boston who aren't actually from Boston don't speak with the Boston accent? No shiat, really?
 
2013-05-12 07:35:07 PM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words.


I'm from Jersey and I drop my T's, but I don't see how it affects French class. Every language I speak, I [try to] pronounce words properly, so I've never dropped my T's while speaking them (French, Spanish,and Japanese). I think the problem is that foreign language students generally suck at pronouncing words at all, and forget about them trying to do a French accent. Some of the dumbest people I ever encountered were in French class.
 
2013-05-12 10:06:24 PM
While dropping the hellish mess of South Jersey accents, at least it catches the Eastern Shore Virginia detour into Tangier Island
 
2013-05-13 11:02:30 AM
Interesting, but why must websites use autoplay videos?
 
2013-05-13 11:28:41 AM

I Like Bread: So where do I go to get a nice tall glass of wooder?


In Fuffia.
 
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