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(Huffington Post)   A detailed map showing the regional American and Canadian dialects; doesn't explain why the rain in Spain stays mainly on the plain   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 135
    More: Interesting, Americans, U.S., dialects, Spain, Canadians, digital audio, gospel musics  
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17954 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 May 2013 at 11:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-12 12:31:17 AM

Fano: CSB, in my grad school in Memphis, some good ole boys came to visit during alumni weekend. They spotted a Sikh in the computer lab and said "haw, I bet you have trouble understanding that feller."

We sure did, because he came from southern Georgia and had the thickest drawl you ever heard, with only a slight hint of Indian. He did say "mang" a lot too, for some unknown reason.


I went to college with kid from Nasville whose father was Indian and whose mother was from Dublin.  He had the best good ol boy accent I've ever heard.
 
2013-05-12 12:33:41 AM

raerae1980: FTA:  Pennsylvania is the most linguistically complex state in the country.

WHO HOO!!!    From Pittsburgh and this makes me proud.  Had a linguistic professor once pinpoint my origins from one sentence: The rose bush needs pruned.

/old CSS


I grew up on the other side of the state and it's more like this...

Heynabonics (pops)
 
2013-05-12 12:34:47 AM
Western, lived in the West all my life. The rest of Y'all sound weird.
 
2013-05-12 12:35:28 AM
I saw this earlier this month


I was amused by the notation for the yellow diagonal lines as indicating "no discernible accent," or something for central Iowa.For instance, in the Ft. Dodge area or central Iowa, final t's tend to elide into the initial d's of the following word--hence Ft. Dodge (Fort Dodge) comes out "For'dodge."


North of there, in the area of Jewell, IA, negative contractions elide, eg. "dint" for "didn't." Also, "drought" tends to be pronounced "droughth" (hard to illustrate just in print, but very noticeable by ear.One of my sisters-in-law says, "din't", but not the other. The one that does has lived in Jewell, IA for close to 40 years, while the other stayed in Mason City. Both of them, as well as my ex, their younger sister, use the curious phrase, "Will you borrow me some...." as opposed to "Will you lend/loan me some..." I always understood the construct of you borrow something from someone and they lend/loan you something. It may just be a north central Iowa thing, as I've heard it from other in the area.
 
2013-05-12 12:35:44 AM
It doesn't explain the rain in Spain, but does it tell you where the best place to park your car is in Harvard yard?
 
2013-05-12 12:35:48 AM
Interesting -- his map shows that Hastings, Nebraska (near where I grew up) is at the intersection of five different dialects.

Although, I've heard that most news reporters are "trained" to talk with a Nebraska/South Dakota/Iowa "lack" of accent.
 
2013-05-12 12:40:39 AM
You never hear anyone going, you know like, uh,  Yeaaah, you know, from El Paso Texas, born and raised, yeah, whaddya mean my accents funny to ya?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-05-12 12:43:12 AM

unbelver: I thought it fell mostly on the Spaniards?

--Carlos V.


I just know that in mountainous Korea it falls mainly on the slopes, rather than the plains.
 
2013-05-12 12:43:31 AM

RangerTaylor: I'm glad to be vindicated.  When I spent a few years in New Orleans, I insisted to people that they had a NY accent, and everyone looked at me weird.

Ha!

I am invincible!


Grandmother is from the West Bank originally and yes folks from New Orleans have an almost NYC accent with just a slight hint of a southern drawl.
 
2013-05-12 12:45:37 AM
WhippingBoy:coke


Oh fine, bring that up. Moved from a soda region (S California) to a pop area (NW Oregon). Now use both interchangeably. Don't understand why people get so emotional about it (except using "Coke" for other types of soft drinks is moronic :-) ).

Born and raised in the LA area and have most of the regionalisms, but, for no discernible reason, I say Long Island as Lon Guyland. Have no idea where I picked that up.
 
2013-05-12 12:48:50 AM
Pop is the only accepted term.
 
2013-05-12 12:49:22 AM

WhippingBoy: So... "soda"... "pop"... or "coke"?


Soda for carbonated beverages, coke for cola.

RangerTaylor: I am invincible!


4.bp.blogspot.com

You're a loony!
 
2013-05-12 12:51:40 AM
So in all of California only Frisco has a different accent which is differentiated by whether on rhymes with Dawn or Don, which I've never heard pronounced differently. I mean there is a different accent but it's more along the lines of "Thay thailor wanna thuck my dick?" than anything to do with Don vs. Dawn.
 
2013-05-12 12:51:55 AM

skinink: Fahk off in yah cah, ya cuhnt!


Wicked pissah Bahston accent!
 
2013-05-12 12:57:50 AM
It really depends how urban or rural you are.

I grew up in Michigan. We do have a specific dialect here, but it is very "neutral" as American dialects go. We have a few strangely pronounced words ("melk" instead of "milk", and the tendency to put an apostrophe-S on the end of any business name: Walmart's, Kmart's, Meijer's, etc.), and we also have the tendency to talk a bit faster than people further south (it's cold up here many months. No time to stand around jawing in the cold!)

But here's the thing. While I have adopted the "standard" Michigan accent, right across the river from me, in a more rural town, people sounded like they were from southern Indiana. They really sounded like goobers to me. They used words like "reckon", "If'n", and "yonder", too. Less than a mile difference, and suddenly it was like walking into Deliverance.

And then you have to consider we have a lot of people from around the world here. We have one city that has the highest Middle Eastern population of North America, and another that has a ridiculously large Asian population. We have the yoopers who have their own dialect. We have the entire Detroit area that has a mishmash of dialects, including African American/Ebonics/What-have-you. We have parts of the western coast where people talk like they came here from Minnesota, as well as the large western Michigan Dutch population. We have Amish in several areas who have their own dialect, and Mennonites who seem to have their own, as well. We get tons of foreign exchange students in our universities, and they bring dialects from around the world that sometimes "stick" with locals. We have Saugatuck which is known for its high homosexual population and some of them have a unique way of speaking is not uncommon in that area. In the southern parts of the state we have people who sound like they're from Indianapolis, and in the far north there are those who speak French or Finnish. We have a large Native American population, too, and each one of those tribes has their own dialect for English, as well as their own language.

So saying there's a "Michigan accent" is really selling it short.

As for me, I spoke with a weird pseudo-British accent (London English) for a while when I was a kid because of some weird circumstances (brain damage, picked up the accent of the first person I heard when I woke up. Long story.) I had to teach myself to sound like other Michigan natives because I got sick of being bugged about it, and because a lot of people in America in the 80s thought that English accent = Gay, for some reason.

I was a dialect coach when I was involved in drama/theater. I can fake a lot of accents pretty well, but I know that if natives of those regions/countries listen to me, they'll be able to pick it apart unless I can spend some time around someone who speaks that accent. I pick them up quickly, and then I can't shake them easily.

There are days when I heat a Scot talking, and end up fighting to drop the Scots accent all the rest of the day.

In America, I have to say the most unpleasant accent I've heard is the one I heard in a Waffle House outside of Nashville, TN. I don't know if it was an actual Nashville accent (I suspect not) but it was a southern accent with a lot of mushmouthed garble-bargle to it. The speaker sounded as if he was getting tired of pronouncing his words about halfway through his sentences, so he'd say something like, "Yon'ta git yalls crah hang ow day lon. I don ma wan huuuh. Mm-hmm." but he'd say it with this definite twang. It sounded something like Alabama, but also a bit like a Cajun with a large tumor on his tongue.

Anyway, if there's a place in the country where people all talk like that, I'd like to avoid it.
 
2013-05-12 12:59:50 AM
His work on Canada sucks.Seriously if you are going to have that many sub-dialects for some of the American states then you don't get only two english Canadian and 1-2 French Canadian dialects, and only note Irish Newfoundland as an exception to the Atlantic Provinces. Newfoundland gets it's own sub-dialect, if not more than one. Cape Breton gets its own. Each of the Maritime provinces have a different dialect, and I'd argue there are some distinct ones sub-provincially as well. Same elsewhere. People from southern Ontario sound different than those from Northern Ontario, sound different from Manitoba, etc.
 
2013-05-12 01:00:35 AM

OscarTamerz: So in all of California only Frisco has a different accent which is differentiated by whether on rhymes with Dawn or Don, which I've never heard pronounced differently.


The clearest indication somebody ISN'T from San Francisco or the Bay Area is if they call it "Frisco". I've been living in the New York metropolitan area since 2008 and I refuse to call Manhattan "The City", because to me San Francisco will always be The City.

/csb
 
2013-05-12 01:02:47 AM
ugh. "hear" not "heat".

I try not to heat up Scots. They're hot enough already!
 
2013-05-12 01:07:57 AM

Pribar: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...

My older brother was born and spent his first 3 years in Germany, he also looks a lot like our dad who is half Cherokee. In high school he took Spanish 1 and the first day that they practiced he said the teacher listened to him, got a weird look on his face left and came back with another teacher and asked him to repeat what he just said, when he did both teachers cracked up, they noticed he was getting upset so they apologized and explained that it was just weird hearing a native American speaking Spanish with a German accent.


During my freshman and sophomore years at a Los Angeles area high school, my Spanish teacher was French. Naturally, she spoke Spanish with a French accent and most of the native Spanish speakers in the class had LOTS of trouble understanding what she was saying.
 
2013-05-12 01:09:13 AM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: People from CT have no accent, we are the standard by which all others are measured.

/that is all


My friends from other states know when they've met someone else from CT.  "There's no accent there"

.  .  .   don't know much about standards though.
 
2013-05-12 01:11:06 AM
The example that's listed for Lily,Ky sounds like almost every single person I've met here in London,if they were born here that is.
 
2013-05-12 01:15:14 AM

joshiz: Cool find. Although there are even more sub-dialects. After living in Northern California there is a definite northern california dialect vs. southern california dialect although that map lumps them together.

Now I live in Chicago and while the accent is very similar, I can tell if people are from Michigan right away.


Southern Illinoisan here; his map is kinda arbitrary.  I'm sort of amazed that he put Benton on the map, because it's not even close to the biggest town in the region.  Population a little over 7,000.

I'd say the split down the middle of southern Illinois is pretty accurate, but I'd take it up higher.  People in Benton and above definitely have a drawl.  Being from the region, I can generally tell whether someone's from the eastern or western side of the state, how close they live to one of the rivers, and heck, the accent changes drastically once you cross one of the rivers.

Pretty awesome project, though.
 
2013-05-12 01:22:44 AM

buckler: Pribar: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...

My older brother was born and spent his first 3 years in Germany, he also looks a lot like our dad who is half Cherokee. In high school he took Spanish 1 and the first day that they practiced he said the teacher listened to him, got a weird look on his face left and came back with another teacher and asked him to repeat what he just said, when he did both teachers cracked up, they noticed he was getting upset so they apologized and explained that it was just weird hearing a native American speaking Spanish with a German accent.

I once got a German visitor from work, so I decided to use my limited college German skills to exchange pleasantries. He told me I spoke German with a Norweigian accent; apparently something I'd picked up from my professor.


Most professors are better at teaching a foreign language than speaking it.
 
2013-05-12 01:33:58 AM
No data on Hawaii, apparently...
 
2013-05-12 01:35:52 AM

titwrench: My future in laws are from upstate NY and to me their accent is Minnesota like. I am a native San Diegan and they tell me I say the word "dollar" weird but they can't explain how. The future Mrs. titwrench has almost lost her accent but it comes right back as soon as she gets around family.


San Diego? Don't kid yourself. There are so many cold climate transplants that you sound midwestern. Then again, I have yet to meet a non-Mexican native from SD.


What I find amusing in general about American 'dialects' is how judgmental people get.
 
2013-05-12 01:40:54 AM

ZeroCorpse: I grew up in Michigan. We do have a specific dialect here, but it is very "neutral" as American dialects go. We have a few strangely pronounced words ("melk" instead of "milk", and the tendency to put an apostrophe-S on the end of any business name: Walmart's, Kmart's, Meijer's, etc.), and we also have the tendency to talk a bit faster than people further south (it's cold up here many months. No time to stand around jawing in the cold!)


I'm thinking about it (grew up in Michigan too), and personally at least, that seems to only be the case for names that you could append "[Name]'s General Store.  So I'd say "I'm going to [Name]", where Name is:

Meijer's
Daimen's Hardware (I misspelled this, because they went out of business about a decade ago, and google autocorrect has failed me.)
Dr. Dubin's (local optometrist and glasses store)
Barnes and Noble's

But other things get left alone.

Costco
CVS
Kmart
Walmart

/Also, for highway names, anything that isn't 3 digits (696, 275) or a nickname (Lodge, Southfield, Davison) gets the full name to avoid confusion (M-14, US-12, I-75).  I still do it out here with I-80, but CA doesn't quite prepend like M, so state highways are just the number.
//Also, for my fellow Bay Area people, is there a CA equivalent of Meijer?  Back in Michigan, it and Target filled the useful niche of "Walmart, but clean and for not-poor people"
 
2013-05-12 01:42:55 AM

meyerkev: ZeroCorpse: I grew up in Michigan. We do have a specific dialect here, but it is very "neutral" as American dialects go. We have a few strangely pronounced words ("melk" instead of "milk", and the tendency to put an apostrophe-S on the end of any business name: Walmart's, Kmart's, Meijer's, etc.), and we also have the tendency to talk a bit faster than people further south (it's cold up here many months. No time to stand around jawing in the cold!)

I'm thinking about it (grew up in Michigan too), and personally at least, that seems to only be the case for names that you could append "[Name]'s General Store.  So I'd say "I'm going to [Name]", where Name is:

Meijer's
Daimen's Hardware (I misspelled this, because they went out of business about a decade ago, and google autocorrect has failed me.)
Dr. Dubin's (local optometrist and glasses store)
Barnes and Noble's

But other things get left alone.

Costco
CVS
Kmart
Walmart

/Also, for highway names, anything that isn't 3 digits (696, 275) or a nickname (Lodge, Southfield, Davison) gets the full name to avoid confusion (M-14, US-12, I-75).  I still do it out here with I-80, but CA doesn't quite prepend like M, so state highways are just the number.
//Also, for my fellow Bay Area people, is there a CA equivalent of Meijer?  Back in Michigan, it and Target filled the useful niche of "Walmart, but clean and for not-poor people"


I should also add that a lot of multi-word name get shortened to [First Word]'s.

Dubin's
Coldstone's
etc.
 
2013-05-12 01:50:08 AM
While the joke is that people from Connecticut have no accent, I think the map is pretty accurate for the area. It's varies depending how far away east or west you are from the river.  NW CT and SW MA people born/raised tend to have  "berkshire" accents. Not quite the same as what they have there.

/it's regular CT mixed with hill language.
//there's totally a reason for it. no one cares, so I won't bother
///same reason the word "raggie" exists.
 
2013-05-12 01:50:51 AM

joshiz: Cool find. Although there are even more sub-dialects. After living in Northern California there is a definite northern california dialect vs. southern california dialect although that map lumps them together.

Now I live in Chicago and while the accent is very similar, I can tell if people are from Michigan right away.


This
 
2013-05-12 01:52:52 AM

AirForbes1: OscarTamerz: So in all of California only Frisco has a different accent which is differentiated by whether on rhymes with Dawn or Don, which I've never heard pronounced differently.

The clearest indication somebody ISN'T from San Francisco or the Bay Area is if they call it "Frisco". I've been living in the New York metropolitan area since 2008 and I refuse to call Manhattan "The City", because to me San Francisco will always be The City.

/csb


The best way to tell if a Californian is from northern or southern California is to ask them directions to their house.

If they say something like "Take the 5 to the 110 north, then go left at the xxxx exit" they're from southern California.  If they say "Take 101 north, then get on 880..." they're from the Bay Area.  Our freeways down here are THE freeways.

filter: titwrench: My future in laws are from upstate NY and to me their accent is Minnesota like. I am a native San Diegan and they tell me I say the word "dollar" weird but they can't explain how. The future Mrs. titwrench has almost lost her accent but it comes right back as soon as she gets around family.

San Diego? Don't kid yourself. There are so many cold climate transplants that you sound midwestern. Then again, I have yet to meet a non-Mexican native from SD.


What I find amusing in general about American 'dialects' is how judgmental people get.


There's plenty of non-mexi SD natives.  I'd guess at this point about 1/3 of us are Asian, maybe more.  And yes, we all abuse the schwa mercilessly, dude.
 
2013-05-12 02:03:41 AM
Jagoffs
 
2013-05-12 02:06:35 AM

DreamSnipers: Western, lived in the West all my life. The rest of Y'all sound weird.


As an Army Brat raised in the South and Texas, by a Grandmother from Mizzoura, and then moved from Texas up to Maine and the wilds of Yankeeland, no matter where I go I sound weird. Maine and Mass have smoothed off some of the drawl, and yet, I can slip into a Down East accent fair quick, and then back into a hahd Bostonian in a flash. The nice thing about being an Army Brat is that you pick up local color as a survival trait. Drop me in Florida, and leave me on Calle Ocho, and I slip into the cadence in a day or two. Dropped into Phoenix, my Texas twang came back, because it's easier to be a roving Texican than a Masshole. Up in Colorado, it smoothed back to a bit more of a drawl, because there were so damn many other Southerners roaming the mountain--of course, it got confused a bit when the Filipinos we worked with started in with Tagalog and messed up my more Cubanized Spanish.

Accents and dialect are ways we cement where we come from, who we identify with, who we present ourselves to be. We adopt bits and pieces of accents we are exposed to, and can do it quickly if we apply ourselves, because it's a natural way to fit in. It is as much a way to designate ourselves a part of the troop we're with.

filter: What I find amusing in general about American 'dialects' is how judgmental people get.


That's absolutely natural. Accent places you, not just regionally, but social class as well. It is an imprint on speech patterns that is supposed to place you, and folks identify that place fair quick. It is exactly what we're trained to do, and it is part of our social wiring. Here and abroad. Aussies do it. The English do it. The French do it. Multiplicities of Africans do it, as do the Chinese. It's not just Americans; humans get social cues from speech patterns that identify you with place and region, and social class. We learn what those patterns mean as we grow, but it is a natural part of how we process social cues. We are naught but apes who wandered, a lot, and we can tell a lot by how far that speech is different than our own. Different tribe, different troupe, different part of the social hierarchy, and it's less amusing, than a natural outgrowth of our being social apes.
 
2013-05-12 02:06:51 AM

SpookyEyes: Like the poster from New Jersey, I drop my t's from many words. Mountain becomes "mou'in" but I still would pronounce the t in Montenegro. Interesting./Utahn//damn phone won't use the reply button


I tend to drop the "k" from "breakfast."  Unless I make an effort to pronounce it correctly, it comes out "bre'fast."  I don't think it's a regional thing, though.  And as far as I know, it's only that one word.

I also pronounce "Dawn" and "Don" exactly the same, nor can I hear the difference when other people who swear there is a difference pronounce the two words.  I'm still not completely convinced that the whole "they sound completely different" thing isn't some sort of hoax.
 
2013-05-12 02:27:25 AM

Bonzo_1116: AirForbes1: OscarTamerz: So in all of California only Frisco has a different accent which is differentiated by whether on rhymes with Dawn or Don, which I've never heard pronounced differently.

The clearest indication somebody ISN'T from San Francisco or the Bay Area is if they call it "Frisco". I've been living in the New York metropolitan area since 2008 and I refuse to call Manhattan "The City", because to me San Francisco will always be The City.

/csb

The best way to tell if a Californian is from northern or southern California is to ask them directions to their house.

If they say something like "Take the 5 to the 110 north, then go left at the xxxx exit" they're from southern California.  If they say "Take 101 north, then get on 880..." they're from the Bay Area.  Our freeways down here are THE freeways.


And y'know if your linguistic analysis failed, you'd know where they live, which is also a good way to find out where they live.
 
2013-05-12 02:49:04 AM

meyerkev: I find it absolutely hilarious that San Francisco has a midwestern accent.

/Of course, given that everyone here seems to have followed: Grew up in Midwest -> Lived in shiatty apartment in the Valley to avoid commute -> got married and bought house in East Bay (and then biatch about the 880 commute because there is no mass transit between the East Bay and the Valley, and there's only 1 freeway), I can't say I'm surprised.
//And the natives seem to have all said: "Fark this, I'm moving somewhere cheaper because a nice 2 BR, 2 BA house is 1.3 million CASH."


Get out of my mind!!!
 
2013-05-12 02:51:48 AM
So where do I go to get a nice tall glass of wooder?
 
2013-05-12 03:10:35 AM
If you live close enough to the US-Canadian border, you will pick up bits of accent of the opposite side.

/pronounces "house" like those hosers on the other side
//doesn't help that more and more housing and garden shows are filmed in Canada, reenforcing that vocalization
 
2013-05-12 03:14:41 AM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: . It's like a Chinese guy with a Cajun accent speaking English.


How about a Cajun/Chinese guy with a Midland/Neutral accent and a southern vocabulary?

Y'all ever seen an Asian with a banjo?

If you do, say hi, I'm nice enough.
 
2013-05-12 03:29:52 AM

ciberido: SpookyEyes: Like the poster from New Jersey, I drop my t's from many words. Mountain becomes "mou'in" but I still would pronounce the t in Montenegro. Interesting./Utahn//damn phone won't use the reply button

I tend to drop the "k" from "breakfast."  Unless I make an effort to pronounce it correctly, it comes out "bre'fast."  I don't think it's a regional thing, though.  And as far as I know, it's only that one word.

I also pronounce "Dawn" and "Don" exactly the same, nor can I hear the difference when other people who swear there is a difference pronounce the two words.  I'm still not completely convinced that the whole "they sound completely different" thing isn't some sort of hoax.


I say them differently. Dawn sounds like "don" if that makes any sense (hard to write out the sound)

Don sounds a little like "dahn" but probably not as nasally as it looks there. I'm midwestern though and through.

Also, people from northern Missouri worsh the deeshes. Only the women though. Not being sexist - they really say that. Any long i comes out ee.
 
2013-05-12 03:44:21 AM
I once had someone ask me for directions to "the 405." I said he needed to go 1,100 miles south.

The road in Washington is 405, as is the one in Oregon.  The road in California is The 405.
 
2013-05-12 03:53:24 AM

Pribar: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...

My older brother was born and spent his first 3 years in Germany, he also looks a lot like our dad who is half Cherokee. In high school he took Spanish 1 and the first day that they practiced he said the teacher listened to him, got a weird look on his face left and came back with another teacher and asked him to repeat what he just said, when he did both teachers cracked up, they noticed he was getting upset so they apologized and explained that it was just weird hearing a native American speaking Spanish with a German accent.


Try being born in Georgia USA, moving to England and being called "YANK"
 
2013-05-12 04:31:15 AM
Damnit, I read this bit (on the detail page) in Bjork's voice

Wē sûrtənlē kŏŏd, ăz ī ăm dōōĭng nou! Ĭn kənĕktəd tĕkst ŧħâr ĭz nō nēd tōō ĭndəkāt hwĭch sĭləbəl ĭz strĕst, sĭns ŧħĭs wĭl yōōzhəlē bē ŏbvēəs. Ăz yōō kən sē, Ĭngglĭsh hăz ə lŏt əv soundz, bŭt ĕvrē wŭn əv ŧħəm ĭz nēdəd!

/Damn you Monty Python
//Actually a Møøse did bite my sister, but she lives in Minnesota.
 
2013-05-12 04:54:41 AM

MurphyMurphy: Everyone has a dialect. That said, the most accent neutral places I've seen in the many I've lived are MI and PA.

Now, there are areas in each state where groups do have very distinguishable accents. However areas like Harrisburg, Scranton and Erie, PA seem to have no distinct accent. I've seen the same in the nicer lake communities of western lower-peninsula MI.

I'm sure there are a lot of areas like this. In fact I think I'd find a map of the more "correctly spoken" regions more interesting vs one of all the different accents.


trust me when i say michiganders have accents. I live in Ontario just on the ON/MI border and they sound so different.
 
2013-05-12 04:59:03 AM
Only a few accents west of Quebec? The author has never been to Canada I see.
 
2013-05-12 05:28:54 AM
ciberido:

I also pronounce "Dawn" and "Don" exactly the same, nor can I hear the difference when other people who swear there is a difference pronounce the two words.  I'm still not completely convinced that the whole "they sound completely different" thing isn't some sort of hoax.

I'm from Michigan, and we do have a nasal way of saying our 'a' and 'o' vowel sounds.  I lost a lot of my Michigan accent when living with Americans from all over, but as soon as I talk to my mom, it comes right back.  Don = 'Dahn' and mom = 'mahm' (though dawn is normal).  Sorry becomes 'sahrry' and pop = 'pahp'
I can keep my O's under control, but my A's are still nasally.

I was born & raised in MI, but never did get into 'Meijers' - I just say 'Meijer' - never understood why people add the 's.  People here also say 'Barnes & Nobles' which drives me crazy.


/ask someone from MI to say 'backpack' or 'badass' - sounds like Bobby's mom from Bobby's World ('Bahbby's Mahm')
//'ya know' is common here (without the doncha)
 
2013-05-12 05:54:11 AM
??  Apparently it's rare to pronounce 'cot' and 'caught' with the same vowel?  I don't recall ever hearing a non-southern North American pronounce 'caught' without the 'cot' vowel.

And nowhere can I find any examples of how else to say 'caught' other than 'cot'.

Same with 'father' and 'bother'.
 
2013-05-12 06:01:32 AM

dave_dfwm: Interesting -- his map shows that Hastings, Nebraska (near where I grew up) is at the intersection of five different dialects.

Although, I've heard that most news reporters are "trained" to talk with a Nebraska/South Dakota/Iowa "lack" of accent.


Like the American version of "BBC English".
 
2013-05-12 06:09:56 AM

ontariolightning: Only a few accents west of Quebec? The author has never been to Canada I see.


I was staring at it and going, "Really, maritimers sound like BC'ers?!" for the longest time before I noted there was a very slight difference in the shade of pink used.

But yeah. Reading through his website, he appears to just search for audio clips he thinks are representative of the region and listen to them.
 
2013-05-12 06:19:09 AM

Dinjiin: If you live close enough to the US-Canadian border, you will pick up bits of accent of the opposite side.

/pronounces "house" like those hosers on the other side
//doesn't help that more and more housing and garden shows are filmed in Canada, reenforcing that vocalization


Did a høøse once bite your sister?
 
2013-05-12 06:46:40 AM
I've seen people from Georgia that sounded like the anchor on the local news, as much as I've seen a white dude from the suburbs speaking like Charles Ramsey.
I am not exactly sure how any region enters into it.  I think it almost comes down to the street you live on and the people you hang out with.

All I can say for certain is that, the more lazy a person is with their dialect, the more likely they are to be poor, stupid, and unmotivated.

"Can I axe yu a qestion?"

Seriously...  Pull it together, man!
 
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