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(Huffington Post)   A detailed map showing the regional American and Canadian dialects; doesn't explain why the rain in Spain stays mainly on the plain   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 135
    More: Interesting, Americans, U.S., dialects, Spain, Canadians, digital audio, gospel musics  
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17944 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 May 2013 at 11:31 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-11 06:54:13 PM
Cool find. Although there are even more sub-dialects. After living in Northern California there is a definite northern california dialect vs. southern california dialect although that map lumps them together.

Now I live in Chicago and while the accent is very similar, I can tell if people are from Michigan right away.
 
2013-05-11 07:14:34 PM
Approves:

media-1.web.britannica.com
 
2013-05-11 08:55:46 PM
Everyone has a dialect. That said, the most accent neutral places I've seen in the many I've lived are MI and PA.

Now, there are areas in each state where groups do have very distinguishable accents. However areas like Harrisburg, Scranton and Erie, PA seem to have no distinct accent. I've seen the same in the nicer lake communities of western lower-peninsula MI.

I'm sure there are a lot of areas like this. In fact I think I'd find a map of the more "correctly spoken" regions more interesting vs one of all the different accents.
 
2013-05-11 09:44:19 PM
FTA:  Pennsylvania is the most linguistically complex state in the country.

WHO HOO!!!    From Pittsburgh and this makes me proud.  Had a linguistic professor once pinpoint my origins from one sentence: The rose bush needs pruned.

/old CSS
 
2013-05-11 09:56:25 PM

raerae1980: FTA:  Pennsylvania is the most linguistically complex state in the country.

WHO HOO!!!    From Pittsburgh and this makes me proud.  Had a linguistic professor once pinpoint my origins from one sentence: The rose bush needs pruned.

/old CSS


My uncle lives in Pittsburgh. When he visits, he commonly asks, "What have yinz been up to?"

/"yinz" pronounced like "you-inz" for the uninitiated
//get your dirty hands away from my pop
 
2013-05-11 09:57:26 PM

joshiz: Cool find. Although there are even more sub-dialects. After living in Northern California there is a definite northern california dialect vs. southern california dialect although that map lumps them together.

Now I live in Chicago and while the accent is very similar, I can tell if people are from Michigan right away.


What? An east coast centric map? The hell you say.

Certainly the folk of Ukiah speak the same language as those of Portland.
 
2013-05-11 09:59:16 PM
Hell, some people in some parts of the state use different vowels for the same word.

I mean, they're stoned, but that's another story.
 
2013-05-11 10:06:59 PM
pretty generalized
 
2013-05-11 10:36:18 PM

joshiz: Now I live in Chicago and while the accent is very similar, I can tell if people are from Michigan right away.


Likewise.  I'm from Michigan and can tell if people are from Chicago right away as well.

I have to wonder how much time it took them to put this together.  Reminds me of another site that has people all over the world speaking english...the Speech Accent Archive:  http://accent.gmu.edu/
 
2013-05-11 11:33:25 PM
Fahk off in yah cah, ya cuhnt!
 
2013-05-11 11:35:10 PM
This is pretty cool.

Basically, if you talk like everyone else sings, you're not one of the freaks.
 
2013-05-11 11:41:02 PM
I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...
 
2013-05-11 11:41:35 PM
This is bullshiat, in the last year, I've lived in Michigan, Illinois and Missouri and everybody talks the same.
 
2013-05-11 11:43:46 PM
Yeah but is it, Duck-Duck-Goose or Duck-Duck-Grey Duck?

...and is it grey or gray?
 
2013-05-11 11:44:38 PM
So... "soda"... "pop"... or "coke"?
 
2013-05-11 11:45:11 PM
I have been aware of the differences between "Florida Southern" and "Southern" English, and happy to see it reflected here.

Though neither are very appealing to the ear. (Speaking as North American English scum. Maybe furreners like the sound.)

I'm also glad I managed to grow up not talking like that.
 
2013-05-11 11:45:17 PM

Popcorn Johnny: This is bullshiat, in the last year, I've lived in Michigan, Illinois and Missouri and everybody talks the same.


Most people talk with generic "newscaster" non accent these days. The map is for the folks that actually have accents.
 
2013-05-11 11:48:54 PM
Very cool. I would argue that the more rural sections of Virginia, north and south Carolina are right up there with Pa. as far as diversity of dialect. Sometimes just a few miles of distance seems to change the accents significantly. Also, as someone else mentioned, being from a certain place makes you hyper aware of your own accent when you hear another person speak with the same inflections and speech patterns.
 
2013-05-11 11:49:26 PM
Boy the guy they picked for Sheboygan has a very light example of the Inland North.

Hey der eh you, remember when once'in so ainna we go down to Tuppers to get our our hairs cut.

It is amazing that I could actually understand people from the outside world when I left there.
 
2013-05-11 11:53:23 PM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...


My older brother was born and spent his first 3 years in Germany, he also looks a lot like our dad who is half Cherokee. In high school he took Spanish 1 and the first day that they practiced he said the teacher listened to him, got a weird look on his face left and came back with another teacher and asked him to repeat what he just said, when he did both teachers cracked up, they noticed he was getting upset so they apologized and explained that it was just weird hearing a native American speaking Spanish with a German accent.
 
2013-05-11 11:53:59 PM
Repeat from a few years ago.
 
2013-05-11 11:54:37 PM

Popcorn Johnny: This is bullshiat, in the last year, I've lived in Michigan, Illinois and Missouri and everybody talks the same.


Large city or relatively rural? There is a significant difference (I've lived in both M's, and there is a distinct difference).
 
2013-05-11 11:54:57 PM
My connection isn't good enough to bring up the HuffPo site right now, but is this the guy that's been doing it as a hobby for years now? Because he seems pretty darn cool. I was shocked how "flattened" my vowels are compared to all the alternatives. There are some 7-10 (IIRC) sets of words that some people pronounce the same and others pronounce differently. The typical midwestern accent flattens about 75% of them. It was fascinating.
 
2013-05-11 11:55:15 PM
Do I really sound like that?
 
2013-05-11 11:56:53 PM
I find it absolutely hilarious that San Francisco has a midwestern accent.

/Of course, given that everyone here seems to have followed: Grew up in Midwest -> Lived in shiatty apartment in the Valley to avoid commute -> got married and bought house in East Bay (and then biatch about the 880 commute because there is no mass transit between the East Bay and the Valley, and there's only 1 freeway), I can't say I'm surprised.
//And the natives seem to have all said: "Fark this, I'm moving somewhere cheaper because a nice 2 BR, 2 BA house is 1.3 million CASH."
 
2013-05-11 11:57:34 PM

feanorn: Popcorn Johnny: This is bullshiat, in the last year, I've lived in Michigan, Illinois and Missouri and everybody talks the same.

Large city or relatively rural? There is a significant difference (I've lived in both M's, and there is a distinct difference).


Detroit, Chicago and Kansas City.
 
2013-05-11 11:58:14 PM
People from CT have no accent, we are the standard by which all others are measured.

/that is all
 
2013-05-11 11:59:59 PM
Map fails without Ottawa Valley regional accent.
 
2013-05-12 12:00:09 AM

raerae1980: FTA:  Pennsylvania is the most linguistically complex state in the country.

WHO HOO!!!    From Pittsburgh and this makes me proud.  Had a linguistic professor once pinpoint my origins from one sentence: The rose bush needs pruned.

/old CSS


My folklore prof at UVa, Perdue, named within 50 miles everyone where everyone in the class grew up based on our answer to "what is that hot brown liquid you drink in the morning?"
 
2013-05-12 12:01:00 AM

meyerkev: I find it absolutely hilarious that San Francisco has a midwestern accent.

/Of course, given that everyone here seems to have followed: Grew up in Midwest -> Lived in shiatty apartment in the Valley to avoid commute -> got married and bought house in East Bay (and then biatch about the 880 commute because there is no mass transit between the East Bay and the Valley, and there's only 1 freeway), I can't say I'm surprised.
//And the natives seem to have all said: "Fark this, I'm moving somewhere cheaper because a nice 2 BR, 2 BA house is 1.3 million CASH."


Richmond, VA has some weird pocket where people say "aboot," and "soorry"
 
2013-05-12 12:02:45 AM

MurphyMurphy: Everyone has a dialect. That said, the most accent neutral places I've seen in the many I've lived are MI and PA.


Ever been to Nebraska or South Dakota?  Very accent neutral.  It's why there are so many call centers.  People have a very easy time understanding our speech.
 
2013-05-12 12:05:00 AM
Well, this explains why all y'all sound funny.
 
2013-05-12 12:05:16 AM

Pribar: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...

My older brother was born and spent his first 3 years in Germany, he also looks a lot like our dad who is half Cherokee. In high school he took Spanish 1 and the first day that they practiced he said the teacher listened to him, got a weird look on his face left and came back with another teacher and asked him to repeat what he just said, when he did both teachers cracked up, they noticed he was getting upset so they apologized and explained that it was just weird hearing a native American speaking Spanish with a German accent.


I feel for him. I speak French with a Provençal accent and get the weirdest looks. It's like a Chinese guy with a Cajun accent speaking English.
 
2013-05-12 12:05:27 AM
My future in laws are from upstate NY and to me their accent is Minnesota like. I am a native San Diegan and they tell me I say the word "dollar" weird but they can't explain how. The future Mrs. titwrench has almost lost her accent but it comes right back as soon as she gets around family.
 
2013-05-12 12:06:48 AM
The Baltimore accent is not the same as a south Jersey accent.

/gotta love that thick Essex accent hun.
 
2013-05-12 12:07:30 AM

chuggernaught: MurphyMurphy: Everyone has a dialect. That said, the most accent neutral places I've seen in the many I've lived are MI and PA.

Ever been to Nebraska or South Dakota?  Very accent neutral.  It's why there are so many call centers.  People have a very easy time understanding our speech.


About the only US accents I cant understand are the Masshole and the NYC/NJ accent.
 
2013-05-12 12:09:41 AM
Like the poster from New Jersey, I drop my t's from many words. Mountain becomes "mou'in" but I still would pronounce the t in Montenegro. Interesting./Utahn//damn phone won't use the reply button
 
2013-05-12 12:15:48 AM
From Des Moines, IA. I speak GAE, the rest of you rubes need to learn to speak proper American English.
 
2013-05-12 12:16:34 AM
Any map that says all of English Canada West of Quebec has the same dialect is wrong.

/Mind you, I've drank a lot tonight and I may not be getting the difference between accents and dialects in this case...
 
2013-05-12 12:17:08 AM
Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist:
I feel for him. I speak French with a Provençal accent and get the weirdest looks. It's like a Chinese guy with a Cajun accent speaking English.

lh4.googleusercontent.com
 
2013-05-12 12:19:50 AM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: Pribar: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...

My older brother was born and spent his first 3 years in Germany, he also looks a lot like our dad who is half Cherokee. In high school he took Spanish 1 and the first day that they practiced he said the teacher listened to him, got a weird look on his face left and came back with another teacher and asked him to repeat what he just said, when he did both teachers cracked up, they noticed he was getting upset so they apologized and explained that it was just weird hearing a native American speaking Spanish with a German accent.

I feel for him. I speak French with a Provençal accent and get the weirdest looks. It's like a Chinese guy with a Cajun accent speaking English.


CSB, in my grad school in Memphis, some good ole boys came to visit during alumni weekend. They spotted a Sikh in the computer lab and said "haw, I bet you have trouble understanding that feller."

We sure did, because he came from southern Georgia and had the thickest drawl you ever heard, with only a slight hint of Indian. He did say "mang" a lot too, for some unknown reason.
 
2013-05-12 12:20:41 AM

Pribar: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: I had a teacher once tell us that she hated teaching French to kids from New Jersey because they drop their T's in the middle of words. And periodically, decades later, I'll find myself repeatedly saying "mountain" out loud as "moun'ain," and blow my mind again.

/moun'ain, foun'ain, Mon'enegro...

My older brother was born and spent his first 3 years in Germany, he also looks a lot like our dad who is half Cherokee. In high school he took Spanish 1 and the first day that they practiced he said the teacher listened to him, got a weird look on his face left and came back with another teacher and asked him to repeat what he just said, when he did both teachers cracked up, they noticed he was getting upset so they apologized and explained that it was just weird hearing a native American speaking Spanish with a German accent.


I once got a German visitor from work, so I decided to use my limited college German skills to exchange pleasantries. He told me I spoke German with a Norweigian accent; apparently something I'd picked up from my professor.
 
2013-05-12 12:20:55 AM

WhippingBoy: So... "soda"... "pop"... or "coke"?


Softie pop
 
2013-05-12 12:21:41 AM
I'm glad to be vindicated.  When I spent a few years in New Orleans, I insisted to people that they had a NY accent, and everyone looked at me weird.

Ha!

I am invincible!
 
2013-05-12 12:24:41 AM
I thought it fell mostly on the Spaniards?

--Carlos V.
 
2013-05-12 12:24:48 AM
Holy crap that's cool.

Interesting to me personally is how he even took the time to catch some of the First Nations boundaries.  I used to live up in Northern Saskatchewan, and the level of detail in the La Loche / Buffalo Narrows area is remarkable...these are tiny little communities of 200-3000 people, but he's accurately placed the line of demarcation between predominantly Denesuline and English speaking areas...I'm thinking either his missionary work or his hobbies have taken him up into that part of the world frequently...
 
2013-05-12 12:25:16 AM

WhippingBoy: So... "soda"... "pop"... or "coke"?


Pop. But I have learned to call it coke now that I live in the south.
 
2013-05-12 12:26:00 AM
One thing that I always find interesting living in Metro Detroit -- despite the incredible amount of cross-border traffic and the shared media markets, the accents in Windsor sound WAY more like those in Toronto or London or Missisauga than they do in Detroit.
 
2013-05-12 12:27:51 AM

joshiz: Cool find. Although there are even more sub-dialects. After living in Northern California there is a definite northern california dialect vs. southern california dialect although that map lumps them together.

Now I live in Chicago and while the accent is very similar, I can tell if people are from Michigan right away.


It's because we make pretty much every proper noun plural, isn't it?
 
2013-05-12 12:27:52 AM

RangerTaylor: I'm glad to be vindicated.  When I spent a few years in New Orleans, I insisted to people that they had a NY accent, and everyone looked at me weird.

Ha!

I am invincible!



I beg to differ...

basementrejects.com
 
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