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(Washington Post)   Who killed rock and roll? No, not uptight parents, angry preachers, or strict school principals. It was foodies   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 56
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3241 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 11 May 2013 at 5:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-11 01:38:15 PM  
WHAT KILLED ROCK N ROLL?  PEOPLE DONT WANT TO LISTEN TO MUSIC ABOUT farkING ALL THE farkING TIME.
 
2013-05-11 01:42:32 PM  
How many times has rock been killed now?
 
2013-05-11 01:46:35 PM  

Shostie: How many times has rock been killed now?


Only once, but people keep taking turns raping it's bloated, track-marked corpse.
 
2013-05-11 01:50:24 PM  
i1282.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-11 01:55:19 PM  
Although it remains tricky to directly connect those two arcs, it still feels like

SCIENCE!
 
2013-05-11 01:56:18 PM  
With all the in-depth introspection and brilliant analysis contained within the article, I have to wonder just how much lint the author eventually DID find in his navel.
 
2013-05-11 02:19:58 PM  
joan jett
 
2013-05-11 02:26:38 PM  
I thought it was a plane crash.
 
2013-05-11 02:31:54 PM  

RedPhoenix122: I thought it was a plane crash.


Nah, it started with an earthquake, birds and snakes, THEN the plane crashed.
 
2013-05-11 02:33:14 PM  
Anyone who thinks rock is dead is an idiot.
 
2013-05-11 02:55:44 PM  
I was chef at the Iron Horse Music Hall for four years. I did food for an ass ton of shows out in Phoenix attached to Cricket Pavillion and Glendale Arena. I've done tours as a personal chef. I don't say this to brag, but to put things into perspective.

This article is tripe and rarified bullsh*t.

I've done food for punk shows, for jazz crowds, blues, and more singer-songwriters whose names I can barely remember. I got hauled onstage by Meshell Ndegeocello who called my chicken "Propa!" I've fed the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Willie Nelson and his crew and band, Dick Dale, Robbie Fulks and Cat Power. I've fed their crowds.

You tailor menus to the crowd. If folks bemoan and wail: tough titty. You're not getting a pistachio crusted chèvre at a Luther Johnson show. You CAN get a great burger at a LCJ show, and a nice vermouth and cracked black pepper shrimp too.

It's not foodies killing music--it's the production companies looking to elevate easily controlled, barely sentient artists who are entirely beholden to the studios. There is GREAT music out there. Amazing shows, amazing artists, but you have to look for them, and support them. Folks looking for a nice meal and a quiet show can usually find one. To find a great show, with some killer drinks and a bang on menu that suits, you got to look for it. It has never been easy, but it is worth it.
 
2013-05-11 02:57:10 PM  
Well, then, it's time for rockers to start killing foodies.  It's self-defense.
 
2013-05-11 02:57:28 PM  
Sorry, but rock still lives on in these 11-year olds from Brooklyn.
 
2013-05-11 03:27:57 PM  
Over the past decade, we've seen the rise of the foodie class and decline of the record industry. Are the two related? When did we start talking about new food trucks instead of new bands? When did the line outside El Centro D.F. taqueria get longer than the line outside the Black Cat? Is $8 a reasonable price for an order of duck fat french fries just because we can stream our music for free on Spotify?

or maybe its because you are ten years older and are now just surrounded by an older group of people. or maybe you just had a tight deadline and needed to sh*t out a poorly thought out premise.
 
2013-05-11 03:46:41 PM  
I remember a VH1 special where Lita Ford talked about how no one like so ROCK anymore and all I could think was how glad I was that no one liked to ROCK like Lita Ford or any of those atrocious ROCK acts like Heart any more.
 
2013-05-11 04:12:46 PM  

Lorelle: RedPhoenix122: I thought it was a plane crash.

Nah, it started with an earthquake, birds and snakes, THEN the plane crashed.


Lenny Bruce was not afraid.
 
2013-05-11 05:30:06 PM  
Rock n roll ain't noise pollution
Rock n roll ain't gonna die
Rock n roll ain't noise pollution
Rock n roll it will survive
 
2013-05-11 05:30:15 PM  

Shostie: Lorelle: RedPhoenix122: I thought it was a plane crash.

Nah, it started with an earthquake, birds and snakes, THEN the plane crashed.

Lenny Bruce was not afraid.


LEONARD BERNSTEIN!
 
2013-05-11 05:45:52 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-05-11 05:51:21 PM  
It's like this: stuff that starts our rebellious ends up really safe.

20 years ago, the Glastonbury festival cost like £20 to get into, it was stuffed full of stoned hippies and goths and grebos in their teens and early 20s. Now, it's full of middle-aged people watching the Rolling Stones who have packed a french press and have an expectation of vegan tacos.

Even Reading has lost it now. I saw The Strokes headlining, with The White Stripes. Today, it's Green Day and Eminem.

Know idea what the kids are seeing. Hope they're having fun, though.
 
2013-05-11 05:58:49 PM  

SpikeStrip: joan jett


No, no, no, you got that wrong, she loves rock and roll.
 
2013-05-11 05:59:59 PM  

farkeruk: It's like this: stuff that starts our rebellious ends up really safe.

20 years ago, the Glastonbury festival cost like £20 to get into, it was stuffed full of stoned hippies and goths and grebos in their teens and early 20s. Now, it's full of middle-aged people watching the Rolling Stones who have packed a french press and have an expectation of vegan tacos.

Even Reading has lost it now. I saw The Strokes headlining, with The White Stripes. Today, it's Green Day and Eminem.

Know idea what the kids are seeing. Hope they're having fun, though.


Pretty much this, the 1992 Lollapolooza line up would barely raise an eyebrow these days.
 
2013-05-11 06:10:12 PM  
"My, my - hey, hey - Rock and Roll is Here to Stay..."

/although truthfully, it can be better to rust than to burn out

//you get much better mileage
 
2013-05-11 06:24:29 PM  
I'm not certain what Foodies are.

Listening to Device on my iPhone, while I'm out of town for the weekend.
 
2013-05-11 06:25:05 PM  

hubiestubert: I was chef at the Iron Horse Music Hall for four years. I did food for an ass ton of shows out in Phoenix attached to Cricket Pavillion and Glendale Arena. I've done tours as a personal chef. I don't say this to brag, but to put things into perspective.

This article is tripe and rarified bullsh*t.

I've done food for punk shows, for jazz crowds, blues, and more singer-songwriters whose names I can barely remember. I got hauled onstage by Meshell Ndegeocello who called my chicken "Propa!" I've fed the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Willie Nelson and his crew and band, Dick Dale, Robbie Fulks and Cat Power. I've fed their crowds.

You tailor menus to the crowd. If folks bemoan and wail: tough titty. You're not getting a pistachio crusted chèvre at a Luther Johnson show. You CAN get a great burger at a LCJ show, and a nice vermouth and cracked black pepper shrimp too.

It's not foodies killing music--it's the production companies looking to elevate easily controlled, barely sentient artists who are entirely beholden to the studios. There is GREAT music out there. Amazing shows, amazing artists, but you have to look for them, and support them. Folks looking for a nice meal and a quiet show can usually find one. To find a great show, with some killer drinks and a bang on menu that suits, you got to look for it. It has never been easy, but it is worth it.




I think you missed the point. As Bob Lefstz wrote:


Food, it's everything music once was.

Take the TV channels... MTV is a dying enterprise which is not based on music, but lowest common denominator losers in reality shows. The Food Network had to split in two, there was that much demand. They're mixing ingredients we thought didn't go together, and everybody in music is playing in their own niche ghetto, complaining that it's not bigger.

Going to the show is expensive. But food has gone downmarket. You can eat gourmet at a food truck for under ten bucks. Try seeing a music star live for that price.

Musicians are trying to sell out, get in bed with the Fortune 500, whereas food doesn't scale that way, it's an end unto itself. It used to be that way in music, before everybody got a scent and a clothing line.

But we all are still listening, just like we all are still eating, how can the game be changed?

http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2013/05/10/are-foodie s -quietly-killing-rock-and-roll/

 
2013-05-11 06:47:50 PM  
Foodies, as opposed to people who don't like food?

One of the stupidest words ever created
 
2013-05-11 06:52:13 PM  
I thought Paper always killed Rock.
 
2013-05-11 06:55:08 PM  
Possibly true, since bat heads aren't acceptable cuisine now.
 
2013-05-11 07:07:27 PM  
Just because it doesn't rule the world doesn't mean it's dead.  The spirit will always carry on.
 
2013-05-11 07:10:24 PM  
I saw In Flames twice on their last tour- once in a venue outside of the States. The venue was beautiful inside, and they served pretty nice food, too. There was no food flying- the people who wanted to eat, they ate. The people who wanted to rock, they stood and rocked. Everyone was happy, and it was easily one of the best shows I've ever been to.
 
2013-05-11 07:12:13 PM  

dennysgod: SpikeStrip: joan jett

No, no, no, you got that wrong, she loves rock and roll.


You misheard, she actually loves rocky road.
 
2013-05-11 07:36:55 PM  
Sometimes food and rock cross paths in a most awesome and delicious fashion.  For example, Grill 'Em All is a heavy metal-themed restaurant that serves gourmet burgers.  So you can sit down and have a delicious burger and a cold beer while listening to loud metal music.  Seriously awesome place.

Alphax: I'm not certain what Foodies are.


A foodie is a hipster who is pretentious about food instead of indie music.
 
2013-05-11 07:40:48 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: dennysgod: SpikeStrip: joan jett

No, no, no, you got that wrong, she loves rock and roll.

You misheard, she actually loves rocky road.


She hates herself for loving you.
 
2013-05-11 08:01:53 PM  
Just like movies and books, rock-n-roll will always hang in there for the next set of better days.
 
2013-05-11 08:05:33 PM  
Or, it could be going to a concert is a ridiculous expense because of scalpers.  It's the same reason that people don't go to football games like they used to- it's too expensive and full of hassle.

Personally, I'd rather spend my money taking the kids to the theater to see a musical or the ballet (they aren't quite old enough for the symphony), or take them to the ballpark, since it doesn't cost too much here to see the Pirates.
 
2013-05-11 08:06:01 PM  

OtherLittleGuy: Tyrone Slothrop: dennysgod: SpikeStrip: joan jett

No, no, no, you got that wrong, she loves rock and roll.

You misheard, she actually loves rocky road.

She hates herself for loving you.


Gods, I wish. I'd give her the best 5 seconds of her life.
 
2013-05-11 08:11:13 PM  
I blame audience and record label system
 
2013-05-11 08:23:05 PM  
I'm gonna go with the rolling stones

/What do I win? is it 600$ tickets?
 
2013-05-11 08:27:02 PM  
I though the release of Pet Sounds was the end of Rock 'n Roll?
 
2013-05-11 08:33:00 PM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: I remember a VH1 special where Lita Ford talked about how no one like so ROCK anymore and all I could think was how glad I was that no one liked to ROCK like Lita Ford or any of those atrocious ROCK acts like Heart any more.


I think it was sometime in the 80's when the hair-bands kept coming out with lyrics like "we're rockin', yeah we're rockin', we're rockin' all night 'cause we love to ROCK!"

I can only take so much self-referential music. Nowadays we get either death-metal or computer-generated crap, it seems. More King Crimson, please.
 
2013-05-11 08:49:35 PM  
I love rock and roll but I wish it didn't have to happen at 1am in some uncomfortable place with a terrible toilet
 
2013-05-11 09:24:36 PM  

HempHead: hubiestubert: I was chef at the Iron Horse Music Hall for four years. I did food for an ass ton of shows out in Phoenix attached to Cricket Pavillion and Glendale Arena. I've done tours as a personal chef. I don't say this to brag, but to put things into perspective.

This article is tripe and rarified bullsh*t.

I've done food for punk shows, for jazz crowds, blues, and more singer-songwriters whose names I can barely remember. I got hauled onstage by Meshell Ndegeocello who called my chicken "Propa!" I've fed the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Willie Nelson and his crew and band, Dick Dale, Robbie Fulks and Cat Power. I've fed their crowds.

You tailor menus to the crowd. If folks bemoan and wail: tough titty. You're not getting a pistachio crusted chèvre at a Luther Johnson show. You CAN get a great burger at a LCJ show, and a nice vermouth and cracked black pepper shrimp too.

It's not foodies killing music--it's the production companies looking to elevate easily controlled, barely sentient artists who are entirely beholden to the studios. There is GREAT music out there. Amazing shows, amazing artists, but you have to look for them, and support them. Folks looking for a nice meal and a quiet show can usually find one. To find a great show, with some killer drinks and a bang on menu that suits, you got to look for it. It has never been easy, but it is worth it.



I think you missed the point. As Bob Lefstz wrote:


Food, it's everything music once was.

Take the TV channels... MTV is a dying enterprise which is not based on music, but lowest common denominator losers in reality shows. The Food Network had to split in two, there was that much demand. They're mixing ingredients we thought didn't go together, and everybody in music is playing in their own niche ghetto, complaining that it's not bigger.

Going to the show is expensive. But food has gone downmarket. You can eat gourmet at a food truck for under ten bucks. Try seeing a music star live for that price.

Musicians are trying to sell out, get in bed with the Fortune 500, whereas food doesn't scale that way, it's an end unto itself. It used to be that way in music, before everybody got a scent and a clothing line.

But we all are still listening, just like we all are still eating, how can the game be changed?

http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2013/05/10/are-foodie s -quietly-killing-rock-and-roll/


TLDR. But maybe, just maybe, Food Network is succeeding because their Network is about Food. M(usic)TV hasn't touched music with a 10' pole in well over a decade...
 
2013-05-11 11:05:26 PM  
Food meets rock in the form of Tad.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9lZ1P9Rlo8

Also, many miss the distinction between what rocks and what pops:

http://www.furious.com/perfect/carducci.html
 
2013-05-11 11:17:14 PM  
HempHead:I think you missed the point. As Bob Lefstz wrote:


Food, it's everything music once was.

Take the TV channels... MTV is a dying enterprise which is not based on music, but lowest common denominator losers in reality shows. The Food Network had to split in two, there was that much demand. They're mixing ingredients we thought didn't go together, and everybody in music is playing in their own niche ghetto, complaining that it's not bigger.

Going to the show is expensive. But food has gone downmarket. You can eat gourmet at a food truck for under ten bucks. Try seeing a music star live for that price.

Musicians are trying to sell out, get in bed with the Fortune 500, whereas food doesn't scale that way, it's an end unto itself. It used to be that way in music, before everybody got a scent and a clothing line.

But we all are still listening, just like we all are still eating, how can the game be changed?
http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2013/05/10/are-foodie s -quietly-killing-rock-and-roll/" target="_blank">
http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2013/05/10/are-foodi e s -quietly-killing-rock-and-roll/


No, I got his point. And I simply disagree with it.

Packaged products, like the Reality TV pablum is nothing new. Packaged stars, are exactly that: product. They aren't artists. They are image, and surface, and little else. The Food Network does exactly the same thing. Their packaged chefs are stars. They are a device to sell folks on the image, the idea, the experience, and it does little to actually touch on the real business. It is naught but smoke and mirrors. The same way that MTV went with their own reality shows.

If you think that musicians are all about selling out, then you're listening to the wrong bands perhaps. There is a strong Indie scene, there are a lot of great artists who doing their own thing, and have their own labels, because the larger ones are NOT about music. They are about image.

The Food Network packages similarly. The various "reality" shows that have some talented folks, and their drive to package these rising "star" is the exact same thing that NY and LA has done for generations: skyrocket a particular set of chefs, who will make a splash, and then aren't heard from again because they don't have the skill set or the temperament for the actual industry.

THAT is what is ailing the music business. Not the huge stars, but the execs who package these stars, and rising stars, and pad out playlists across the country to push certain artists, who are, ultimately, entirely replaceable. And the food industry does the same. And it's that sort of interference and meddling, that has cost a lot of clubs, because it skews the market in odd ways.

You can find some amazing bands, rock, soul, bluegrass, country, jazz, ska--yes, Virginia there are STILL ska bands out there, and they've been rolling on since BEFORE rock and roll came onto the scene--and more. You just have to look for the good shows, and follow the good ones. The same way you find great restaurants. Or great artists of any stripe. You stop listening to the folks who are paid to promote in large venues, and you start listening to the music. You go out and find great restaurants, and stop listening to folks gush about the molecular gastronomy.

What is in a lull right now, are the packaged bands, and the execs haven't quite figured out that their own meddling and molding, is what is ailing their industry. They are trying to control the industry, and that very meddling is what is killing it. Not just the ticket prices, but the ticket prices for crappy bands, that are often more about the costume changes, than the music.

Best show I saw in the last few years was a festival at Cricket Pavillion. Aerosmith was headlining, and there are a ton of acts on the stage, but ZZ Top came out right before Aerosmith and I can just imagine Steve Tyler's face when he heard them rip it up. Just came out, tore up that stage, played a set that just shamed every damn act that had gone on before them, and they could have closed the f*cker up right after their set, and folks would have been happy. No crazy pyrotechnics. No flashy light show. Just guys, guitars, and a LOT of fun. THAT is what is missing in a lot of shows nowadays. THAT is what is throttling the industry: not enough guys just going out there and ripping up the damn stage.

There are folks who still do it. With class, with style, and you just have to find them. And maybe stop handing over a gazillion dollars for Stones tickets. Find the good folks, follow them, demand their play on the radio, and if folks won't, then make up your damn playlist, buy their sh*t, and make the industry realize that there is a demand that they didn't engineer.
 
2013-05-11 11:23:34 PM  

hubiestubert: HempHead:I think you missed the point. As Bob Lefstz wrote:


Food, it's everything music once was.

Take the TV channels... MTV is a dying enterprise which is not based on music, but lowest common denominator losers in reality shows. The Food Network had to split in two, there was that much demand. They're mixing ingredients we thought didn't go together, and everybody in music is playing in their own niche ghetto, complaining that it's not bigger.

Going to the show is expensive. But food has gone downmarket. You can eat gourmet at a food truck for under ten bucks. Try seeing a music star live for that price.

Musicians are trying to sell out, get in bed with the Fortune 500, whereas food doesn't scale that way, it's an end unto itself. It used to be that way in music, before everybody got a scent and a clothing line.

But we all are still listening, just like we all are still eating, how can the game be changed?
http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2013/05/10/are-foodie s -quietly-killing-rock-and-roll/" target="_blank">
http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2013/05/10/are-foodi e s -quietly-killing-rock-and-roll/

No, I got his point. And I simply disagree with it.

Packaged products, like the Reality TV pablum is nothing new. Packaged stars, are exactly that: product. They aren't artists. They are image, and surface, and little else. The Food Network does exactly the same thing. Their packaged chefs are stars. They are a device to sell folks on the image, the idea, the experience, and it does little to actually touch on the real business. It is naught but smoke and mirrors. The same way that MTV went with their own reality shows.

If you think that musicians are all about selling out, then you're listening to the wrong bands perhaps. There is a strong Indie scene, there are a lot of great artists who doing their own thing, and have their own labels, because the larger ones are NOT about music. They are about image.

The Food Network pack ...


Newsletter. Subscription. And such and such.

/preach it
 
kab
2013-05-11 11:26:18 PM  
Holy fark that article is dumb.

If there's any comment to be made about a connection between the two, it's that food can't be downloaded, thus it's appreciated a bit more when it's created well.
 
2013-05-11 11:31:02 PM  

kab: Holy fark that article is dumb.

If there's any comment to be made about a connection between the two, it's that food can't be downloaded, thus it's appreciated a bit more when it's created well.


I can cook like a motherf*cker.  Playing an instrument.......not so much.
 
2013-05-11 11:44:21 PM  
Sounds like the author had to justify charging tickets and food to the company card.
 
2013-05-11 11:50:55 PM  
i'm sorry, what?
 
2013-05-12 01:35:54 AM  
jimmythrust: The crazy thing? The push to make "stars" out of chefs and particular and beholden companies, is going to crash a lot of the trendy and hip restaurants as well. The thing is, that restaurants crash and burn all the time. In NY, the model has been for the trendiest to be open only for year, sometimes less even. Investors hop on, restaurant opens, chef does his or her splash, and then when it comes time to cash in, the place goes kaput, and the next "big" thing has already got folks lining up to throw cash into it.

That's how some of the industry operates. What folks are trying to do now, is just maximize the marketing, with tie ins with shows, with tie ins with franchises, with guest stars, and it is about making cooking more about theater, than the food. It is thrilling to some, who aren't actually in the industry, and for the select and controllable few, it is extraordinarily lucrative. But it's not really about the food, or the cooking, or anything else about restaurants. It's about making folks pay out the nose for an "experience" and it is the gastronomic version of a light show and pyrotechnics. It hides behind a facade of a restaurant, or cooking show, but in the end, it's about extracting dollars from folks who want theater, instead of food.

Better to find a great bistro. With a guy or gal behind the line who cares about what they do, their crew, and their staff, and really wants to share their craft. Who likes to cook. Likes to share their food, and a part of their lives.

The claptrap on the Food Network highlights theater not cuisine. For the most part that is. There are a few shows that actually do focus on food, but when you start looking at chefs as "personalities" then you're creeping into odd territory. Chefs tend to be expansive. You have to be in this business. You are a leader, you are a teacher, you are a mentor, you have to impress upon your crew your vision, your style of cooking, and it has to stick in their heads. That does tend to make folks as much performer as mentor, but always with the caveat that at the end of the day, no matter what, the dishes that folks rave about, get washed, and go back on the shelf, and you start again the next day, and do it all again, from scratch. That is the aspect that keeps me relatively humble in this trade, because it is such a Zen profession. The BEST you can hope for, with a really good meal served, is a bunch of clean dishes at the end of the day.

What chefs do is create memories. Not just of the food, but the people you're with. It is sealing a moment in time in folks heads, with sense memories that go beyond just sound, but taste, touch, scent, and even that crunch when your spoon goes through the creme brulee's  hard sugar crust. It is an odd palette to work with, because it's not just your hands that do all this, but managing a crew to prepare, to execute, to deliver, and set the atmosphere. That's the real art. Not just the presentation, or taste, but to bring folks into your restaurant and share your art and passion with them.

Some folks do get that. Some folks just want to trade in some of their skill for some theater and trade on the image of a chef, and market that image until folks are sick unto death of their cheapified  knock offs that they can get from their frozen food aisle. It's a business plan to be sure, but it's the same sickness that ails a lot of the music industry, and trying to say that restaurants are the "new" this or that, hasn't been paying any f*cking attention for the last 50 years...
 
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