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(Uproxx)   "Couldn't you boil this book down to 'biatches Be Crazy'?" - Colbert's most excellent analysis of The Great Gatsby   (uproxx.com) divider line 24
    More: Cool, The Great Gatsby, Gatsby, LeVar Burton, Drew Magary, F. Scott Fitzgerald  
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2549 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 10 May 2013 at 12:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-10 12:34:52 PM
3 votes:
I still can't figure out how this book tops the list of the greatest American novels.

I had to read it in college and I damned near didn't survive the ordeal (it was the most boring book I've ever read).
2013-05-10 04:29:16 PM
2 votes:
I loved The Great Gatsby.  But then again, I grew up the one poor kid amongst a bunch of rich kids.  The book had a great deal of relevance to me.
2013-05-10 02:18:33 PM
2 votes:

PizzaJedi81: DeadintheShadows: graduate level literature course

Horrific Novels of the 21st Century?


K.B.O. Winston: DeadintheShadows: Wuthering Heights stood as the worst book I ever read for a long time. Then I was forced to read Twilight for a graduate level literature course...

At what school?  DeVry?


Ha. No, it was a "Dangerous Literature" course at Eastern Michigan University. It sounded fun when I signed up...then it turned out to be a course about teaching banned books to middle and high school students.

I stuck around because it fulfilled requirements and I was hellbent on finishing my graduate degree in two years.
2013-05-10 12:49:44 PM
2 votes:
Analysis of The Great Gatsby: Don't put pussy on a pedestal.
2013-05-11 03:43:32 AM
1 votes:

KatjaMouse: For many years Gatsby was one of my favorite books despite the fact I found every character within to be a repugnant example of a human being for one reason or another.


That's kind of the point of it. "fark the Jazz Age" was more or less what the book was about.
2013-05-10 10:46:52 PM
1 votes:

ristst: I still can't figure out how this book tops the list of the greatest American novels.

I had to read it in college and I damned near didn't survive the ordeal (it was the most boring book I've ever read).


On the upside: it's short.

I actually like Gatsby.  Ethan Frome, on the other hand....
2013-05-10 06:09:10 PM
1 votes:

Faddy: Someone explain how Daisy represents the death of the American Dream. I have people say that i a major theme.  Is it because despite Gatsby being really rich his new money couldn't get him some top shelf old money pussy meaning that it doesn't matter how rich you are it is what country club your father belonged to.


It's because Americans have this idea that with enough hard work you can be considered equal to those born into wealth.

It is one of the most fundamental ideals of our cultural identity and mythos, we revolted and threw off the shackles of aristocracy! All Men are Created Equal!

Americans are pretty much in denial on how classcist they are... granted we are not as classcist as say England and other old world countries, but parental income is still the most important factor in a child's future success.

If you doubt it's importance, it's one of the primary reasons why we still don't have a single payer health care because of the whole "they just aren't working hard enough!" rhetoric.

TL;DR: Despite ALL of Gatsby's success, Daisy decides to marry her old money asshat of a husband and stays with him. Americans deny it, but class still very much matters in our society.
2013-05-10 05:26:53 PM
1 votes:
Someone explain how Daisy represents the death of the American Dream. I have people say that i a major theme.  Is it because despite Gatsby being really rich his new money couldn't get him some top shelf old money pussy meaning that it doesn't matter how rich you are it is what country club your father belonged to.
2013-05-10 05:22:59 PM
1 votes:

Jekylman: Plant Rights Activist: shortymac:
/I was really sad that I was the pretty much the only one who wasn't sleeping when we were listening to the AUDIO BOOK in HONORS English class.

[encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 221x228]

I would highly recommend audiobooks of traditionally difficult novels. They definitely add a different dimension to the narrative, and can help put boring passages in perspective so that you can actually get something out of them.

Then again, I'm a literature nerd.


I'm a literature nerd myself and I don't like audiobooks, I tend to tune them out.

People are whiners IMHO, most of these classic high school novels are short, it's not like someone is asking you to read War and Peace.

/I tried to read that and I got bored
2013-05-10 05:21:30 PM
1 votes:
It wasn't the worst novel I read for high school. That is still reserved for, "The Mayor of Casterbridge."
2013-05-10 05:16:39 PM
1 votes:

PizzaJedi81: Old Man and the Sea.


This is the one that turned my husband off to fiction altogether.  He hasn't read a work of fiction since middle school that wasn't required.  That story isn't boring; it's soul-crushing.


/best part of last night's episode was the Reading Rainbow bit.
2013-05-10 05:02:16 PM
1 votes:

Plant Rights Activist: shortymac:
/I was really sad that I was the pretty much the only one who wasn't sleeping when we were listening to the AUDIO BOOK in HONORS English class.

[encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 221x228]


I would highly recommend audiobooks of traditionally difficult novels. They definitely add a different dimension to the narrative, and can help put boring passages in perspective so that you can actually get something out of them.

Then again, I'm a literature nerd.
2013-05-10 04:57:27 PM
1 votes:

DrZiffle: biatches be gettin' truculent.


/obscure


Not if you're an Esquire subscriber.
2013-05-10 04:54:24 PM
1 votes:

Plant Rights Activist: shortymac:
/I was really sad that I was the pretty much the only one who wasn't sleeping when we were listening to the AUDIO BOOK in HONORS English class.

[encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 221x228]


The other students in the class complained in class that it was "too boring to read" so the teacher decided to try the audiobook.

The teacher was kinda not 100% involved in the teaching because his wife was having a difficult pregnancy and was out a lot.

HOWEVER, upon discovering that only a few kids in class had seen "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" he stopped the lesson and we watched that instead.

Yeah, even then I was pissed too, it's a SHORT BOOK, have some patience. It's not that hard.

/Got A+'s all year though
ecl
2013-05-10 04:50:43 PM
1 votes:
My father's family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.
I give Pirrip as my father's family name, on the authority of his tombstone and my sister - Mrs. Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith. As I never saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them (for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies regarding what they were like, were unreasonably derived from their tombstones. The shape of the letters on my father's, gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair. From the character and turn of the inscription,


_______________________________________________
Great Expectations gets my vote for shallow and pedantic litereary bores.
2013-05-10 02:48:20 PM
1 votes:

NateAsbestos: Never read Lemony Snickett. Don't think I ever will, now. Thanks for the warning :P


No, no, no, no, no, no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  n o,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  n o,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  n o,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  no,  n o,  no,  no,  no, You ABSOLUTELY want to read the books. They're pretty amazing.
2013-05-10 02:15:05 PM
1 votes:
shortymac:
/I was really sad that I was the pretty much the only one who wasn't sleeping when we were listening to the AUDIO BOOK in HONORS English class.

encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
2013-05-10 02:04:18 PM
1 votes:

DeadintheShadows: graduate level literature course


Horrific Novels of the 21st Century?
2013-05-10 02:04:17 PM
1 votes:
So Gatsby's claim to The Great American Novel is on technical merits?

I'm with team Tropic of Cancer
2013-05-10 01:52:16 PM
1 votes:

ristst: I still can't figure out how this book tops the list of the greatest American novels.

I had to read it in college and I damned near didn't survive the ordeal (it was the most boring book I've ever read).


Because it perfectly encapsulates the attitudes and culture of the time? See also: Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, etc.

I wouldn't call it a boring book, the beginning has a lot of set up and it's a bit dry, but the last half it really picks up and it's a fun read.

/I was really sad that I was the pretty much the only one who wasn't sleeping when we were listening to the AUDIO BOOK in HONORS English class.
//I think the teacher rewarded me by giving me A+s the rest of the year.
2013-05-10 01:46:36 PM
1 votes:
Wuthering Heights stood as the worst book I ever read for a long time. Then I was forced to read Twilight for a graduate level literature course, and the championship belt for most boring book ever read was immediately handed over.
2013-05-10 01:38:16 PM
1 votes:
And sadly people, college kids or high school kids, will use his analysis and without any critical thinking motivation for themselves, never really look into the book for what it's worth.  In a time of high society, glimmer and glam and putting on the Ritz, it's a fascinating spotlight of how the 1% lived in that era.  They're no different than they are today except the technology has changed.
2013-05-10 01:21:50 PM
1 votes:

devilEther: Fun Fact: Hunter S Thompson retyped The Great Gatsby just to get the feeling of typing a great novel.


If he wanted to retype a great novel, why'd he choose Gatsby?
2013-05-10 12:53:00 PM
1 votes:
"Money doesn't buy happiness, but it sure can rent it for a while."
 
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