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(Gizmodo)   Not news: The International Space Station changes its operating system. News: To Linux. Fark: From Windows XP   (gizmodo.com) divider line 124
    More: Interesting  
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3683 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 May 2013 at 11:46 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



124 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-05-10 11:28:16 AM  
Linux will never be a desktop operating system for the masses...

thedroidlawyer.com
 
2013-05-10 11:33:26 AM  
Imagine if the ISS decides to switch exclusively to Apple products.

Apple products fit in a perfect ecosystem with other Apple products.

Imagine using an iPad to release human waste into space

The ISS could cut down on weight by using tablet computers.
 
2013-05-10 11:49:36 AM  
I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.
 
2013-05-10 11:50:54 AM  

clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.


KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE
 
2013-05-10 11:52:11 AM  
The United Space Alliance has decided to stop using all Windows computers aboard the ISS, in favour of Linux-to ensure it's systems are "stable and reliable".

angryflower.com/itsits.gif
 
2013-05-10 11:56:44 AM  
So it's finally the Year of the Linux Space Station?
 
2013-05-10 11:57:52 AM  
In before... you know.

I am a little surprised they were running Windows, though, or any widely used OS. I'd have figured it was some custom-built weirdness.
 
2013-05-10 12:00:56 PM  

semiotix: In before... you know.

I am a little surprised they were running Windows, though, or any widely used OS. I'd have figured it was some custom-built weirdness.


Considering they've had astronauts from 50 different countries up there I think going with a more widely known and familiar system was a good choice.

/going to Linux was a better one
 
2013-05-10 12:02:50 PM  
As a non linux guy, I figured it would have been linux plus proprietary software from the get go.

/would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.
 
2013-05-10 12:04:53 PM  
The main problem with XP is that half the screensavers didn't work in zero gravity.
 
2013-05-10 12:05:05 PM  

semiotix: In before... you know.

I am a little surprised they were running Windows, though, or any widely used OS. I'd have figured it was some custom-built weirdness.


The advantage of windows is that people are familiar with it and that they can run any kind of custom build weirdness on it.
 
2013-05-10 12:05:34 PM  

semiotix: In before... you know.

I am a little surprised they were running Windows, though, or any widely used OS. I'd have figured it was some custom-built weirdness.


All the life support, main voice comms, station-maneuvering, etc stuff is all sorts of VNX/RTOS/custom stuff.  But, data collection for all the scientific missions as well as basic checking e-mail, recreational video watching, etc are off-the-shelf Thinkpads and Toughbooks.
 
2013-05-10 12:08:38 PM  
Surprised they're that current. They sent folks to the moon and back using slide rules and pens.
 
2013-05-10 12:09:19 PM  
So now they can't play any games.
 
2013-05-10 12:09:52 PM  

Unoriginal_Username: /would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.


It's actually really easy.  I've been doing .net development on windows for the past 13 years and recently started thinking about Linux.  I took the plunge and set up all my laptops to dual boot into windows 7 and ubuntu linux.  It took an afternoon.

at a high level, the process is:

*  use windows disk manager to create a raw disk partition on your hard drive (shrink an existing disk)
*  create a bootable USB thumb drive from pendrivelinux.com
*  reboot your PC and enter into the BIOS boot menu (probably ESC, F10, or F11 during the startup process, check online for your particular computer)
*  boot from USB drive
*  Ubuntu installs itself in about 15 minutes

It's gotten so easy to do that it's worth it to at least give it a try
 
2013-05-10 12:11:35 PM  
And?

We were using NT on some of our systems until 3 years ago.

Now that system has XP on it.
 
2013-05-10 12:14:19 PM  

djemonk: It took an afternoon.


Yeah, you sound like a .net developer.
 
2013-05-10 12:20:31 PM  

Gunny Walker: The main problem with XP is that half the screensavers didn't work in zero gravity.


Switch it to "stars" and the other astronauts will panic thinking there is a big hole in the ISS.
 
2013-05-10 12:20:41 PM  

Frozboz: djemonk: It took an afternoon.

Yeah, you sound like a .net developer.


I haven't quite figured out why there's such a strong correlation between linux ability and douchebaggery
 
2013-05-10 12:21:43 PM  

cman: clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.

KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE


Meh.  i'm not a real nerd, although i do try.  The KDE setup is pretty sweet.  I ran Ubuntu as well as Linux Mint w/ Cinnamon, and the KDE setup is by far the most fluid I've used so far.  I'm going to stick with it for a while.
 
2013-05-10 12:24:28 PM  
In space, no one can see the BSOD.
 
2013-05-10 12:32:23 PM  
Why not dual-boot the thing?
 
2013-05-10 12:37:11 PM  
Enh, not that shocking really. Windows XP has always been stable if you:

1.  Tightly control the hardware/drivers
2.  Don't get too damn crazy with the custom weirdness via software

Most of the windows servers I've seen are stable, so long as you bought high quality hardware and didn't install a bunch of adware ridden free software.

/of course every OS is fairly stable in an environment with tight hardware and software controls
 
2013-05-10 12:44:15 PM  

djemonk: Unoriginal_Username: /would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.

It's actually really easy.  I've been doing .net development on windows for the past 13 years and recently started thinking about Linux.  I took the plunge and set up all my laptops to dual boot into windows 7 and ubuntu linux.  It took an afternoon.

at a high level, the process is:

*  use windows disk manager to create a raw disk partition on your hard drive (shrink an existing disk)
*  create a bootable USB thumb drive from pendrivelinux.com
*  reboot your PC and enter into the BIOS boot menu (probably ESC, F10, or F11 during the startup process, check online for your particular computer)
*  boot from USB drive
*  Ubuntu installs itself in about 15 minutes

It's gotten so easy to do that it's worth it to at least give it a try


Hell a lot of times you don't even need to need to create a raw disk partition before you boot from cd/usb. Also unetbootin is your friend.
 
2013-05-10 12:44:25 PM  

djemonk: Frozboz: djemonk: It took an afternoon.

Yeah, you sound like a .net developer.

I haven't quite figured out why there's such a strong correlation between linux ability and douchebaggery


Imagine all the built-up angst in knowing your only achievement in life is learning to use some guy's hobby project as a daily thing.  The only thing you can lord over people is you took the most tedious path possible when it came to getting what you want out of a computing experience.  That your one joy is trying to brow-beat those that have better things to do then read endless forum posts that basically cycle between "How do I do X?" and "RTFM noob" or "Why would you ever want to do X?!"  Imagine what it'd be like to be the literal laughing stock of end user experiences and the butt of classics like "year of the linux desktop!".

That is where Frozdoz lives, its a little sad but don't worry not all linux users are like that.  Some of us don't pretend the OS is more then it is:  A solid background server with absolutely no business trying to be your main interface.
 
2013-05-10 12:46:42 PM  
Given how long the space station has been in orbit, XP is not that surprising.
 
2013-05-10 12:48:30 PM  

xria: Switch it to "stars" and the other astronauts will panic thinking there is a big hole in the ISS.


I laughed
 
2013-05-10 12:49:47 PM  

cman: clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.

KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE


I use assembly code after upgrading from binary logic sequences via punch cards.

/Hipster shades
 
2013-05-10 12:51:06 PM  
Good luck finding drivers, IN SPAAACCCCCEEEEE
 
2013-05-10 01:04:23 PM  

meat0918: And?

We were using NT on some of our systems until 3 years ago.

Now that system has XP on it.


Sounds like a telecom that rhymes with whey-t-and-t. When I left in 2012 they were trialling some Win7 units on the retail side. It took a while to get it as stable as the XP boxes we'd had forever. Still used some AS/400 weirdness on the network control side though, that stuff was bulletproof.
 
2013-05-10 01:08:42 PM  
what no mainframe??
 
2013-05-10 01:10:13 PM  

semiotix: In before... you know.

I am a little surprised they were running Windows, though, or any widely used OS. I'd have figured it was some custom-built weirdness.


Well, with Windows comes support. NASA has finite resources, and don't necessarily have the resources to fix their own bugs. With Windows, they can just call their contact within the organization and ask for help. Microsoft also makes some of the best development tools available. Windows is actually really good fit for the type of stuff they've been using it for, especially an OS as mature as XP.

cman: clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.

KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE


You shut your whore mouth! There is no prettier way to launch gvim.
 
2013-05-10 01:15:28 PM  
Installing Linux isn't the hard part. Getting your speakers to work properly at the same time you use your mouse, that's where it gets hard.
 
2013-05-10 01:18:06 PM  
How long until the astronauts go crazy and start killing each other?
 
2013-05-10 01:26:47 PM  
I have been using debian from my LAMP server so I'm getting a kick out of this!
 
2013-05-10 01:29:21 PM  
I guess upgrading an entire space station in order to run Windows 8 wasn't cost effective?
 
2013-05-10 01:29:24 PM  
Dammit, not this shiat again.

I work on the same system. I know they guy quoted in the article. Microsoft is NOT banned. The original quote was about a single computer (the domain controller) which now uses Debian 6. The other computers, the clients, the web server, EVERYTHING else still uses Windows.

PS. This is not the command and control computers, this is the desk computer equivalent for the station.
 
2013-05-10 01:30:44 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: cman: clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.

KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE

I use assembly code after upgrading from binary logic sequences via punch cards.

/Hipster shades


Oh, we used to dream of having punched cards. We had rooms full of people who looked things up in log tables.
 
2013-05-10 01:31:25 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Imagine all the built-up angst in knowing your only achievement in life is learning to use some guy's hobby project as a daily thing.


You don't keep up very well.
 
2013-05-10 01:33:07 PM  

djemonk: Unoriginal_Username: /would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.

It's actually really easy.  I've been doing .net development on windows for the past 13 years and recently started thinking about Linux.  I took the plunge and set up all my laptops to dual boot into windows 7 and ubuntu linux.  It took an afternoon.

at a high level, the process is:

*  use windows disk manager to create a raw disk partition on your hard drive (shrink an existing disk)
*  create a bootable USB thumb drive from pendrivelinux.com
*  reboot your PC and enter into the BIOS boot menu (probably ESC, F10, or F11 during the startup process, check online for your particular computer)
*  boot from USB drive
*  Ubuntu installs itself in about 15 minutes

It's gotten so easy to do that it's worth it to at least give it a try


or even just go to pendrivelinux.com , download YUMI and install a few distros on a usb stick. no partitioning, no buyer's remorse.

if you're coming from windows, try lubuntu. it has pretty much the same desktop.
 
2013-05-10 01:40:35 PM  
img395.imageshack.us
 
2013-05-10 01:41:14 PM  

erveek: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: cman: clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.

KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE

I use assembly code after upgrading from binary logic sequences via punch cards.

/Hipster shades

Oh, we used to dream of having punched cards. We had rooms full of people who looked things up in log tables.


I code with a magnetized needle and a steady hand...
 
2013-05-10 01:42:31 PM  

knobmaker: BumpInTheNight: Imagine all the built-up angst in knowing your only achievement in life is learning to use some guy's hobby project as a daily thing.

You don't keep up very well.


and you sound like an itchy neckbeard.
 
2013-05-10 01:42:52 PM  

maxheck: djemonk: Unoriginal_Username: /would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.

It's actually really easy.  I've been doing .net development on windows for the past 13 years and recently started thinking about Linux.  I took the plunge and set up all my laptops to dual boot into windows 7 and ubuntu linux.  It took an afternoon.

at a high level, the process is:

*  use windows disk manager to create a raw disk partition on your hard drive (shrink an existing disk)
*  create a bootable USB thumb drive from pendrivelinux.com
*  reboot your PC and enter into the BIOS boot menu (probably ESC, F10, or F11 during the startup process, check online for your particular computer)
*  boot from USB drive
*  Ubuntu installs itself in about 15 minutes

It's gotten so easy to do that it's worth it to at least give it a try

or even just go to pendrivelinux.com , download YUMI and install a few distros on a usb stick. no partitioning, no buyer's remorse.

if you're coming from windows, try lubuntu. it has pretty much the same desktop.


...only fast.
 
2013-05-10 01:43:09 PM  

djemonk: Unoriginal_Username: /would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.

It's actually really easy.  I've been doing .net development on windows for the past 13 years and recently started thinking about Linux.  I took the plunge and set up all my laptops to dual boot into windows 7 and ubuntu linux.  It took an afternoon.

at a high level, the process is:

*  use windows disk manager to create a raw disk partition on your hard drive (shrink an existing disk)
*  create a bootable USB thumb drive from pendrivelinux.com
*  reboot your PC and enter into the BIOS boot menu (probably ESC, F10, or F11 during the startup process, check online for your particular computer)
*  boot from USB drive
*  Ubuntu installs itself in about 15 minutes

It's gotten so easy to do that it's worth it to at least give it a try


Will probably give it a try. I have an old laptop that isn't doing anything, so will skip the dual boot.

maxheck:  ~snip~

or even just go to pendrivelinux.com , download YUMI and install a few distros on a usb stick. no partitioning, no buyer's remorse.

if you're coming from windows, try lubuntu. it has pretty much the same desktop.


Will look into these.
 
2013-05-10 01:44:01 PM  

cman: clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.

KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE


I'm posting from a computer running Linux Mint Debian Edition XFCE, and I approve of this thread.

/Alas, they discontinued the XFCE edition of LMDE, though there is one for the mainline Mint distro.
 
2013-05-10 01:55:29 PM  

redmid17: djemonk: Unoriginal_Username: /would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.

It's actually really easy.  I've been doing .net development on windows for the past 13 years and recently started thinking about Linux.  I took the plunge and set up all my laptops to dual boot into windows 7 and ubuntu linux.  It took an afternoon.

at a high level, the process is:

*  use windows disk manager to create a raw disk partition on your hard drive (shrink an existing disk)
*  create a bootable USB thumb drive from pendrivelinux.com
*  reboot your PC and enter into the BIOS boot menu (probably ESC, F10, or F11 during the startup process, check online for your particular computer)
*  boot from USB drive
*  Ubuntu installs itself in about 15 minutes

It's gotten so easy to do that it's worth it to at least give it a try

Hell a lot of times you don't even need to need to create a raw disk partition before you boot from cd/usb. Also unetbootin is your friend.


And you did it the hard way! All you really needed to do was use WUBI. It's a Windows installer for Ubuntu. Just install it like any other Windows app. Once installed, you have a nice dual boot computer. If you decide you don't like Ubuntu (because Unity sucks), you can uninstall it from Windows like any other app. It's a nice way to kick the tires before kicking Windows to the curb. Seems like I heard the Mint distro has something similar.

Don't mean to sound all Linux_Yes-ish, but I started using Linux because I'm cheap, not because I like farting with my computer. It has served me well over the last 10 or so years. I wouldn't have any idea how to "recompile my kernel"; I'm not even sure I know what that means, to be honest. Linux does everything I need it to (including games, remote desktop, and video chat), your mileage may vary, but I like it.
 
2013-05-10 01:56:24 PM  

astro716: erveek: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: cman: clancifer: I just recently configured a laptop running Linux Mint KDE, and I friggin love it.

KDE? Ew

Real nerds use XFCE

I use assembly code after upgrading from binary logic sequences via punch cards.

/Hipster shades

Oh, we used to dream of having punched cards. We had rooms full of people who looked things up in log tables.

I code with a magnetized needle and a steady hand...


Luxury. We had 2 kilobytes of ram and the program ROMS were stored in 36 kilobytes of hand-assembled magnetic core rope memory.
 
2013-05-10 02:02:32 PM  

anonymous6494: Dammit, not this shiat again.

I work on the same system. I know they guy quoted in the article. Microsoft is NOT banned. The original quote was about a single computer (the domain controller) which now uses Debian 6. The other computers, the clients, the web server, EVERYTHING else still uses Windows.

PS. This is not the command and control computers, this is the desk computer equivalent for the station.


You got a source on this, everything I have read points to everything being Linux.
 
2013-05-10 02:04:05 PM  

SewerSquirrels: redmid17: djemonk: Unoriginal_Username: /would give installing linux a try, to fking lazy.

It's actually really easy.  I've been doing .net development on windows for the past 13 years and recently started thinking about Linux.  I took the plunge and set up all my laptops to dual boot into windows 7 and ubuntu linux.  It took an afternoon.

at a high level, the process is:

*  use windows disk manager to create a raw disk partition on your hard drive (shrink an existing disk)
*  create a bootable USB thumb drive from pendrivelinux.com
*  reboot your PC and enter into the BIOS boot menu (probably ESC, F10, or F11 during the startup process, check online for your particular computer)
*  boot from USB drive
*  Ubuntu installs itself in about 15 minutes

It's gotten so easy to do that it's worth it to at least give it a try

Hell a lot of times you don't even need to need to create a raw disk partition before you boot from cd/usb. Also unetbootin is your friend.

And you did it the hard way! All you really needed to do was use WUBI. It's a Windows installer for Ubuntu. Just install it like any other Windows app. Once installed, you have a nice dual boot computer. If you decide you don't like Ubuntu (because Unity sucks), you can uninstall it from Windows like any other app. It's a nice way to kick the tires before kicking Windows to the curb. Seems like I heard the Mint distro has something similar.

Don't mean to sound all Linux_Yes-ish, but I started using Linux because I'm cheap, not because I like farting with my computer. It has served me well over the last 10 or so years. I wouldn't have any idea how to "recompile my kernel"; I'm not even sure I know what that means, to be honest. Linux does everything I need it to (including games, remote desktop, and video chat), your mileage may vary, but I like it.


The only times I log into windows now are to host a GTM or play a game. A lot of times I can get them running via Wine but it's usually not worth the trouble.
 
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