If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(About.com)   How to spot a bad online college. Difficulty: Being online isn't on the list   (distancelearn.about.com) divider line 38
    More: Advice, distance education, pet peeves, online courses  
•       •       •

3727 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 May 2013 at 10:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-05-10 09:21:23 AM  
Yes, when I'm looking for advice on higher education and planning for the future, About.com is the very first resource I consider.
 
2013-05-10 10:09:40 AM  
My old school has a good continuing education program with both online and offline classes. Unless the university has a real physical presence it's not worth it. I know people who were raising kids and used online classes to get started on a degree they finished full time when their little one headed off to school.

That being said, I need to start one of these things so I can take advantage of the bored stoner population. That teat just won't quit.
 
2013-05-10 10:23:36 AM  
just about all large universities offer some sort of online programs these days even some on the masters level. To pick an online university is just asking to pay a lot of money for a degree that probably isn't accredited
 
2013-05-10 10:25:31 AM  
I trust  http://www.educationconnection.com/ because I really want to bone their spokesmodel.
 
2013-05-10 10:26:06 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: My old school has a good continuing education program with both online and offline classes. Unless the university has a real physical presence it's not worth it. I know people who were raising kids and used online classes to get started on a degree they finished full time when their little one headed off to school.

That being said, I need to start one of these things so I can take advantage of the bored stoner population. That teat just won't quit.


Ah, the bored stoner... Bored because he's stoned all the time, stoned all the time because he's bored. The only reason I don't fit in there is a lack of connections.
 
2013-05-10 10:27:37 AM  
The disclaimer at the bottom of their web page that states your credits may not transfer to an actual university.
 
2013-05-10 10:29:35 AM  
Workijng for tips and leftover lamb meat. Ain't that the sheet.
/woke up in a used Plymouth
 
2013-05-10 10:31:35 AM  

Pocket Ninja: Yes, when I'm looking for advice on higher education and planning for the future, About.com is the very first resource I consider.


About.com is pretty good biatch, especially for a first place to read. Maybe not the last place to read, but the first - like WP it's a good place to start but not to end.
 
2013-05-10 10:31:48 AM  
Most of the horrible schools with accreditation issues have politicians in bed with them.  Usually conservatives, but this corruptness goes to both sides of the aisle.
 
2013-05-10 10:31:53 AM  

ModernPrimitive01: just about all large universities offer some sort of online programs these days even some on the masters level. To pick an online university is just asking to pay a lot of money for a degree that probably isn't accredited

.

And if you don't care about whether the course is accredited, just take a class through Coursera or Udacity or any of the other MOOC sites that are popping up all over the place.  They're taught by legit profs at legit universities, so at least the content is high-quality.  Way better to spend nothing on high-quality material that is unaccredited than to spend lots of money on low-quality material that is unaccredited.
 
2013-05-10 10:32:40 AM  
My biggest problem w/ this article is its shallowness.  Nowhere does it tell you HOW to check on the areas they suggest, i.e. accreditation, graduation rates, rankings, etc.   My gut tells me to go with programs that also have a real "bricks & mortar" program.
 
2013-05-10 10:33:07 AM  
I work in Academic Technologies, and our online courses are "our" responsibility.  Looked at the list, none of them apply except the adjunct instructor part... but that is only because FT instructors all work as adjuncts in the summer, so technically on Monday 100% of our courses - online and on-campus - will be taught by adjuncts.
 
2013-05-10 10:33:11 AM  

Pocket Ninja: Yes, when I'm looking for advice on higher education and planning for the future, About.com is the very first resource I consider.


Why the New York Times puts its best people on this site, writing blurbs about just about everything. And by best people it means people auditioning as writers for non-existent NYT jobs who are hoping for a lifetime of journalizing as obit writers and real estate house describers.
 
2013-05-10 10:37:23 AM  

wildcardjack: Tr0mBoNe: My old school has a good continuing education program with both online and offline classes. Unless the university has a real physical presence it's not worth it. I know people who were raising kids and used online classes to get started on a degree they finished full time when their little one headed off to school.

That being said, I need to start one of these things so I can take advantage of the bored stoner population. That teat just won't quit.

Ah, the bored stoner... Bored because he's stoned all the time, stoned all the time because he's bored. The only reason I don't fit in there is a lack of connections.


I got connections but can't use 'em due to random drug screens. That's the thing about a small, boring town. A few phone calls and I can get anything from weed to pills to coke or heroin. Sad thing is, most people in this town do just that.
 
2013-05-10 10:39:37 AM  
Accreditation and non-profit status.  Also the USNews university ratings are pretty solid.
 
2013-05-10 10:48:22 AM  

Pocket Ninja: Yes, when I'm looking for advice on higher education and planning for the future, About.com is the very first resource I consider.


Yeah, but I bet you aren't worried about whether you are attending a bad online college.
 
2013-05-10 10:50:39 AM  
you need to find one with a good online fraternity.
 
2013-05-10 10:50:49 AM  
Current student at Western Governor's University, online though they do have campuses across the country. WGU is fully accredited by the same agency as Boise State and several other mainstream colleges so the credits are fully transferable. Gross generalizations are gross.
 
2013-05-10 11:09:57 AM  

EvilEgg: I trust  http://www.educationconnection.com/ because I really want to bone their spokesmodel.

Nnow that she's got a college degree,
She doesn't need cash for giving out a handy,
Now she can cure,
She can cure her V.D.
 
2013-05-10 11:11:56 AM  
Here's the truth-
College/University/Higher Ed what ever, was never intended for the poor.  It was begun in 1585 (+,-).  At that point it MAY have been for education but it hasn't been that way for a looooong time.
Higher Education traditionally (pre-1968 or so) was for the progeny of the rich to meet each other and to develop networking skills necessary later in life/business.

Women attended schools to meet men to marry and to marry well.  As a kid I remember the old saw "Ring By Spring".  If a girl wasn't engaged (to an attractive and eligible young man) by the spring of the senior year, there was always graduate school.  In 1992 the young girl behind me confided that her parents expected her to be married by her Junior year.

It's not just the Frat Boys and the Sorority Sisters, it's campus and university wide.

Enter our innocent first generation immigrants in conjunction with the new "Open Admissions Policy".  Coupled with the  oft repeated "More Education is ALWAYS worth what ever they charge" spiel and you have our current disaster.

NOW we have education system that you never have to meet anyone ever in person and it's a perfect storm of educated individuals (presuming the best of course) that have never met anyone to network with.  This is an because we hire the people we know. If you think about it, nearly any job of value requires you to be networked to find it and be considered for it.  The graduates sit there on the sofa looking at the XBOX and wondering how to pay an educational loan that has virtually NO consumer protections.

Oh I'm sure you're different because you're better than most and I accept that but, for the vast majority of commercial school, online and even a vast number of traditional school students, this is the crappy hand they've been dealt by an industry that is laughing up their sleeve at them.

I apologize if I sound a bit rabid about this but, I see this in my students and I'm doing everything I can to change it.
 
2013-05-10 11:22:19 AM  

Marcintosh: Here's the truth-
College/University/Higher Ed what ever, was never intended for the poor.  It was begun in 1585 (+,-).  At that point it MAY have been for education but it hasn't been that way for a looooong time.
...
I apologize if I sound a bit rabid about this but, I see this in my students and I'm doing everything I can to change it.


You're original description is correct, but MAN you expect way too much from higher ed.
"Higher Ed" has evolved into an in between of trade apprenticeship and the former status.  Why you are seeing dozens of kids going to "business school" is because they're probably going to need to be familiar with the minor legal info they get and understand basic marketing and sales in their office job/sales job/dad's dealership.  The current status of higher ed is to develop rounded corporate cogs that can follow instructions, meet deadlines, and make minor descisions without constant supervision.  It's office worker trade school.

/went to an strayer university for a masters and minimum CPA credits
//The Citadel was just as bad.  Note BAD.
 
2013-05-10 11:24:19 AM  
bad online college

Redundant
 
2013-05-10 12:00:03 PM  
Bubba Jones
I'm also at WGU, in the last semester of my MBA. To me WGU is the ONLY online college worth a sh*t. Anyone who doesn't get that is either living in the past or stupid enough to pay like $50k for a degree that will get them no farther than us.

/Night Owls 4eva
 
2013-05-10 12:00:07 PM  

mike_d85: Marcintosh: Here's the truth-
College/University/Higher Ed what ever, was never intended for the poor.  It was begun in 1585 (+,-).  At that point it MAY have been for education but it hasn't been that way for a looooong time.
...
I apologize if I sound a bit rabid about this but, I see this in my students and I'm doing everything I can to change it.



You're original description is correct, but MAN you expect way too much from higher ed.

Perhaps you are correct but I would think that for $48k (two years ago) in a mid-range univ., someone could offer the idea of being dual major and taking a business class or making Golf a pre-req for media students.

"Higher Ed" has evolved into an in between of trade apprenticeship and the former status.

I don't see that.  Don't disagree, I just don't see it.  Gotta think on that one - be back on that

Why you are seeing dozens of kids going to "business school" is because they're probably going to need to be familiar with the minor legal info they get and understand basic marketing and sales in their office job/sales job/dad's dealership.

I don't teach business school classes.  Sadly most of the students I teach would benefit hugely from at least a few.

The current status of higher ed is to develop rounded corporate cogs that can follow instructions, meet deadlines, and make minor descisions without constant supervision.  It's office worker trade school.

Again, I don't see that.  Currently I see higher ed as a pure cash cow.  "When you're done get out" mentality.  Student's don't understand about the need to understand business so (for example) most communication students grad and then are expected to be able to find freelance work - because that's the way that business has evolved.  There are very very few clock-punch positions in Communications anymore.  Student's don't know how to meet people that might want to hire them.  It's not that they wouldn't or don't want to - they simply don't know how or where to do this.  Again, I'm teaching the first generation to attend higher ed.  I make time during class to teach them how to make a business card using templates and then we do it in class so I know that at they have at least  twenty cards to hand out.  I work deals with a local golf pro to teach them how to golf and the etiquette on and off the course.
These students, my students, some are harder than a coffin nail on the street but in the classroom, it's like taking candy from a baby when they pay tuition.

Admittedly, some of my classes are arranged like a David Lynch film.  "Today, Brian from the nearby production company will speak for a half hour on producing a project, then I will walk you though the making of a business card after the break there will be a lecture on French New Wave Editing"

/went to an strayer university for a masters and minimum CPA credits
//The Citadel was just as bad.  Note BAD.


The Citadel- a friends brother suicided out of there twenty years or more ago -still makes me sad.
 
2013-05-10 12:06:00 PM  
Marcintosh
The tone in your writing does not lead one to expect to find such a f*cking ridiculous, sophomoric and annoying grammatical mistake as adding a GODDAMN APOSTROPHE to a pluralization. Stop trying to post above your GPA.
 
2013-05-10 12:15:09 PM  
Online colleges work well as long as you meet two conditions.

1) They're fully accredited by multiple bodies

2) You're the target student. For a working professional who doesn't have time to attend traditional classes, it's fantastic. It also looks good in an interview, for example, to say "Well, I started at a traditional college, but then I was deployed to Iraq. While there I completed 24 semester hours of school online to finish my bachelors. I chose to stick with the online school for my Master's because of the positive experience I had while attending.
 
2013-05-10 12:36:51 PM  
About.com is a joke.  I've attended online and classroom classes.  The only thing that really matters is the online school having regional accreditation.  Beyond that graduation rates and student reviews are complete BS.  So XYZ moron student enrolls in some online school.  Fails the first 3 classes and quits then blogs online about how the school stole his money and gave him nothing in return.

Brick and mortal schools have limitations on size so they have to be picky about who they admit.  Online classes don't have limitations so they can admit anyone.  It's not their fault if morons enroll and can't hack it.  Some idiots think that online schools are dead easy and a free ride... only after they enroll do they learn that they actually have to do work.
 
2013-05-10 12:42:33 PM  

Aegius: About.com is a joke.  I've attended online and classroom classes.  The only thing that really matters is the online school having regional accreditation.  Beyond that graduation rates and student reviews are complete BS.  So XYZ moron student enrolls in some online school.  Fails the first 3 classes and quits then blogs online about how the school stole his money and gave him nothing in return.

Brick and mortal schools have limitations on size so they have to be picky about who they admit.  Online classes don't have limitations so they can admit anyone.  It's not their fault if morons enroll and can't hack it.  Some idiots think that online schools are dead easy and a free ride... only after they enroll do they learn that they actually have to do work.


Yep... Especially in my graduate program, the work is quite demanding. I have one class left, then a grueling capstone project.
 
2013-05-10 01:29:44 PM  
I have attended multiple on-line and off-line universities at both the graduate and undergraduate level. The best website I know of for dealing with on-line education is www.degreeinfo.com. I post there occasionally, they have been around a long time and have an active user base.

My experience has made me an on-line learning skeptic, even with accredited schools. The biggest problem is simply the fact that cheating is rampant and it is much harder to police. The problem isn't that "everyone is cheating" the problem is that there is no good way to separate the cheaters from those who do not. Second, quality control is totally absent. Even at accredited school many of the classes are extremely weak academically. There are some good school with good professors but they are few and far between. One of the major problems is class size. I have taken graduate courses with 30 students in them. There is no way a professor can give the detailed attention to each student's work that graduate school should require with that many students. As one of my own graduate professors said to me some time ago, "we offer on-line graduate degrees but we would never hire a person to teach at our university, even a adjunct, with only an on-line degree." Is that hypercritical? Yes. But is also understandable.

I still think that on-line learning has potential. But it is like the wild west out there. Be careful folks.
 
2013-05-10 02:03:49 PM  
Hey, you two WGU students/alumni/whatevers.

Is it worth it? I was about to enroll there last Fall, but my mom passed away and I had to put it on hold to get back on track with my life... now I"m ready, but hesitant. Worth it?
 
2013-05-10 02:14:10 PM  
I got a bachelor's degree in application development from one of the enormous online universities (no, not that one) (your second guess is probably right).  I had about 25 years' experience in the field and had worked my way up to the Chief Architect level since getting an AS degree in the 80's, but I couldn't progress any further (CxO level) and felt that my lack of degree was an impediment.

For me, the online university was perfect.   I got credit for most of my old classes, tested out of a couple more, and went through my "how to program" assignments with a couple hours' work per week.  Finished my degree in about 9 months.  Basically, I'd highly recommend this approach if you already know what you're doing and just want the scrap of paper.

Would I ever hire anyone with the same degree that I have but no working experience?   Not on your life, unless they could point to a body of work outside the classroom.   I saw a lot of people struggle mightily because the online experience just wasn't sufficient, either because they were completely on their own after the lectures ended or because the instructors didn't have any knowledge whatsoever of modern programming practices.  (Well, except for the one guy with a heavy Russian accent - he knew his stuff, but nobody could make out a word that he was saying.)

In short, it worked for me but it's certainly not for everybody.  The stigma may not always be deserved but there is definitely some truth behind it.
 
2013-05-10 02:16:17 PM  

speciaal: Hey, you two WGU students/alumni/whatevers.

Is it worth it? I was about to enroll there last Fall, but my mom passed away and I had to put it on hold to get back on track with my life... now I"m ready, but hesitant. Worth it?


I'm also a WGU student. It's definitely worth it. I have been a student there for almost 2 years now.
 
2013-05-10 03:04:19 PM  
The first college I went to had online courses. I signed up for one and forgot all about it, and got an F. Oops! Guess I take online education about as seriously as online cat videos.
 
2013-05-10 03:04:43 PM  
My husband uses Khan Academy on YouTube. He also uses luminosity.com to flex his brain. I believe they're both free.

/just sayin'
 
2013-05-10 06:20:12 PM  

BalugaJoe: you need to find one with a good online fraternity.


Live kegger on Facebook! Woo and YOLO!

/I do take a few classes online, but honestly, I want a degree from a university -- not  a website.
 
2013-05-10 09:03:16 PM  

WordyGrrl: BalugaJoe: you need to find one with a good online fraternity.

Live kegger on Facebook! Woo and YOLO!

/I do take a few classes online, but honestly, I want a degree from a university -- not  a website.


THIS. Took me six years to grind though my undergrad program (work, money, life, not having parents pay my way etc), but I got my degree from an honest to FSM brick and concrete university in 2012 without the "warning: credits may not be transferable anywhere at anytime for any purpose and may cause itchy eyes, runny nose, and extreme flatulence with prolonged use" disclaimers. I can transfer them anywhere, any time and the units are still good. Piece of cake if I want to go to grad school one day.

And it was a much better experience than clickclickclclickclickclickclickclclick on a keyboard all day.
 
2013-05-11 12:07:33 AM  

TheSheriffIsNear: Marcintosh
The tone in your writing does not lead one to expect to find such a f*cking ridiculous, sophomoric and annoying grammatical mistake as adding a GODDAMN APOSTROPHE to a pluralization. Stop trying to post above your GPA.


wow, just wow

FWIW, Cum Laude and a grad GPA of - Oh sorry, I didn't notice it prior; a grammar Nazi, carry on then and please,' accept' my apologie's.  I was in a rush to make a point and make it to work on time.  Please'", continue . . .
 
2013-05-11 03:01:10 PM  

speciaal: Hey, you two WGU students/alumni/whatevers.

Is it worth it? I was about to enroll there last Fall, but my mom passed away and I had to put it on hold to get back on track with my life... now I"m ready, but hesitant. Worth it?


WGU is totally a joke.  I used to work there, in enrollment.  About 99% of the mentors have no qualification in the field they're "mentoring". and the head of enrollment was hired away from U of Phoenix, which should tell you a lot about enrollment practices.  Working there, I got a tuition break, and I have never had classes so easy.  To this day, I have no Idea how they keep their accreditation.  If you're looking for a degree that looks good on paper, but has no knowledge associated with it, go for it.  It's cheaper and more reputable than other diploma mills.  If you want to know the subjects you are studying, try somewhere else.
 
Displayed 38 of 38 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report