Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(io9)   Radioactive products from the last century: toothpaste, chocolate, suppositories. What were we thinking?   (io9.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Nuclear fission product, chocolate bars, chocolates, radium, clock faces  
•       •       •

7097 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 May 2013 at 4:27 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



124 Comments   (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-05-09 08:01:07 PM  
Radium Hand Cleaner - "It Takes Off Everything But The Skin"Give it time. The skin will eventually follow.
 
2013-05-09 08:25:39 PM  
That's what you get for trusting items with this seal of approval:

th08.deviantart.net
 
2013-05-09 08:29:51 PM  

"Don't take our word for it. Ask this satisfied customer what he thinks."

"Arrrgh!"
www.robertswartwood.com

 
2013-05-09 10:32:45 PM  
behance.vo.llnwd.net
 
2013-05-10 12:00:20 AM  
See kids? this is how language evolves

/100 years ago, "It's rad!" had an entirely different meaning
 
2013-05-10 01:16:08 AM  
List fails without radioactive fiesta ware.
 
2013-05-10 02:00:31 AM  

TheHighlandHowler: List fails without radioactive fiesta ware.


Or uranium glass.

Of course most of it is safe and barely radioactive. You have more to fear from lead glazes...
 
2013-05-10 02:25:00 AM  
And people wonder why the FDA is necessary.

I tend to believe people who say that got an F in history class
 
2013-05-10 04:36:33 AM  
Say what you will but I know for a fact most of those products got glowing reviews.
 
2013-05-10 04:36:54 AM  
You can still have fun with radioactivity today.  Go out and buy a big bag of Brazil nuts (which are seeds BTW, not nuts) and take them with you in your pocket to the visitors centre of any nuclear power plant and watch what happens - Brazil nuts are naturally radioactive and have a half-life of 1.2 billion years - you'll be saying "unplanned scrub shower" before you know it.  Bananas are also radioactive but not quite as likely to set off radiation alarms.
 
2013-05-10 04:39:50 AM  

ElPresidente: You can still have fun with radioactivity today.  Go out and buy a big bag of Brazil nuts (which are seeds BTW, not nuts) and take them with you in your pocket to the visitors centre of any nuclear power plant and watch what happens - Brazil nuts are naturally radioactive and have a half-life of 1.2 billion years - you'll be saying "unplanned scrub shower" before you know it.  Bananas are also radioactive but not quite as likely to set off radiation alarms.


So that's why Brazil nuts made my mouth tingle; thought I was allergic.
 
2013-05-10 04:41:50 AM  
See what happens when people blindly believe science with religious zeal.
 
2013-05-10 04:44:50 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: ElPresidente: You can still have fun with radioactivity today.  Go out and buy a big bag of Brazil nuts (which are seeds BTW, not nuts) and take them with you in your pocket to the visitors centre of any nuclear power plant and watch what happens - Brazil nuts are naturally radioactive and have a half-life of 1.2 billion years - you'll be saying "unplanned scrub shower" before you know it.  Bananas are also radioactive but not quite as likely to set off radiation alarms.

So that's why Brazil nuts made my mouth tingle; thought I was allergic.


(uncouth-double-entendre-joke)
 
2013-05-10 04:45:19 AM  
 
2013-05-10 04:45:23 AM  

hardinparamedic: And people wonder why the FDA is necessary.

I tend to believe people who say that got an F in history class


Now, if only the FDA had enough employees...
 
2013-05-10 04:46:36 AM  
From another article on Radithor:

Eben Byers, a 49-year-old wealthy Pittsburgh industrialist, was looking to ease the chronic pain he was having in his arm. The year was 1927, and Eben was advised by his doctor to try a powerful new drug to cure his pain: Radithor. He became hooked. It appeared to not only heal his pain, but seemingly rekindled his sexual vitality.

It was two and a half years after regular use of Radithor, when Eben began complaining of chronic headaches and weight loss. Shortly thereafter, his teeth fell out, holes formed in his skull, and his mouth literally collapsed. Covering Eben's case, an article in the Wall Street Journal ran the headline: "The Radium Water Worked Fine Until His Jaw Came Off."
 
2013-05-10 04:47:40 AM  

hardinparamedic: And people wonder why the FDA is necessary.

I tend to believe people who say that got an F in history class


You'd have a point if the FDA didn't have an unacceptably high rate of both type 1 and type 2 errors. I'm skeptical about the proteins in aggressively bred dwarf wheat, to say nothing of GMOs, and I'd really like to try sublingual immunotherapy.
 
2013-05-10 04:52:49 AM  
"Guaranteed to contain Real Refined Radium and to be perfectly harmless."

It gave you radiation poisoning and cancer? Yes, that's right, it was guaranteed to be perfectly harmless. Here's your 29 cents back.
 
2013-05-10 04:56:08 AM  

chrylis: FDA didn't have an unacceptably high rate of both type 1 and type 2 errors


Are you implying that no oversight has a better history? Government has it's problems, but it seems to have a mechanism to work those out. A good example would be the laws against radioactive toothpaste.
 
2013-05-10 05:00:55 AM  
And how we have homeopathy, chiropractors, and Jenny McCarthy to deal with. Bad crap never goes away, it just changes it's spots.
 
2013-05-10 05:01:39 AM  
its. Doh.
 
2013-05-10 05:02:18 AM  

pellies: Are you implying that no oversight has a better history?


Industry will voluntarily correct their actions after education about regulations. Companies large and small adhere to best practices.
 
2013-05-10 05:05:19 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: And how we have homeopathy, chiropractors, and Jenny McCarthy to deal with. Bad crap never goes away, it just changes it's spots.


I kinda wish those clowns would do a revival of these relics of insanity/ignorance

/it would give many the glow the so deserve
//and free Darwin Award for any customers
///11th purchase is free
 
2013-05-10 05:09:53 AM  

UsikFark: pellies: Are you implying that no oversight has a better history?

Industry will voluntarily correct their actions after education about regulations. Companies large and small adhere to best practices.


I envy you in you ignorant bliss

/because lead and asbestos are so healthy, we've globally stopped using it completely
//people and companies will use what's cheapest (or most gimmicky) to get the job done, whether short term our long term if they can get away with it
 
2013-05-10 05:10:30 AM  

chrylis: You'd have a point if the FDA didn't have an unacceptably high rate of both type 1 and type 2 errors. I'm skeptical about the proteins in aggressively bred dwarf wheat, to say nothing of GMOs, and I'd really like to try sublingual immunotherapy.


Ah, the good old fashioned "Perfect World" fallacy.

Yes. We get that GMOs frighten you, Simple Caveman Lawyer. It still makes the FDA far better than a world of no regulation, and FAR FAR better than what it was when the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1907 was put into law.
 
2013-05-10 05:11:24 AM  
Well I'm not uptight, not unattracted
Turn me on tonight...
 
2013-05-10 05:11:49 AM  

UsikFark: Industry will voluntarily correct their actions after education about regulations. Companies large and small adhere to best practices.


iambrony.jsmart.web.id

Oh, wait. You were serious...not sure if idiot or clever, subtle poe.
 
2013-05-10 05:12:28 AM  
There are a lot of camera lenses that exhibit non-trivial amounts of radiation as well. Not something you want to have glued to your eye for long periods of time.
 
2013-05-10 05:15:46 AM  
I'm not being serious, not by a long shot. Cases like NECC are supposed to be reminders of the oddball stuff people do despite the gov't's regulations.
 
2013-05-10 05:21:54 AM  

hardinparamedic: clever, subtle poe


I'm worried about you. Yes, Poe's law is in effect, but I didn't think it was subtle.
 
2013-05-10 05:32:25 AM  
Ah, the good old days, when you could just make shiat up and call it science. Thank goodness that doesn't happen any more.
 
2013-05-10 05:36:47 AM  
There's a joke about radioactive farts in there somewhere, but I'm just too tired to find it.
 
2013-05-10 05:38:47 AM  

UsikFark: I'm worried about you. Yes, Poe's law is in effect, but I didn't think it was subtle.


I've been paying attention to the politics threads more than usual, and I'm starting to see more and more that people believe in positions that I would have thought to be satire or ridicule.

The sad thing is, I seem to remember that statement being used seriously in one of the threads about defunding the FDA back during the presidential elections.
 
HKW
2013-05-10 05:39:17 AM  
It made as much sense to people then, as global warming does to people now..
 
2013-05-10 05:39:51 AM  
As much as I want to laugh at the ignorance of the time period, we currently produce over 1000 new chemical compounds every year. The percentage of those that are thoroughly tested before being put into use is woefully small.
 
2013-05-10 05:42:43 AM  

UsikFark: Companies large and small adhere to best practices


Best practice being if the shiat hits the fan clean up quick. There is little to no concern for safety beyond what is already known. Without regulating bodies there was nothing but trouble. Show me the history of free market best practices before an incident. I have a few do you?
 
2013-05-10 05:43:39 AM  

hardinparamedic: Yes. We get that GMOs frighten you, Simple Caveman Lawyer.


Nice try.  I'm not frightened of genetic engineering generally, and I'm usually the one pointing out that humans have been selectively breeding and even crossbreeding for millennia, but it seems to me that if we're going to have a massive bureaucracy telling us what sorts of things we can and can't put in our body regardless of how well-informed we are, at least direct insertions from crops humans haven't traditionally consumed should have some level of eye kept on them.

hardinparamedic: It still makes the FDA far better than a world of no regulation, and FAR FAR better than what it was when the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1907 was put into law.


But was that because of the FDA?  I'm perfectly interested in seeing evidence to that effect, but just like air and water were on a dramatically cleaner trajectory well before the Clean Stuff Acts were passed, and federal and state statutory regulations may actually have interfered with getting some waterways cleaned up, increased prosperity and public awareness were already driving improvements in food safety at that time.  Furthermore, how do you account for the harm done by preventing safe, effective medical treatments from being made available in the United States because I can't choose to use unapproved drugs at my own risk like I can use non-UL electronics?
 
2013-05-10 05:55:27 AM  
Experts always saying somethings good for you one day and deadly the next. Just heard
that fish oil supplements cause heart disease.
 
2013-05-10 05:55:28 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: And how we have homeopathy, chiropractors, and Jenny McCarthy to deal with. Bad crap never goes away, it just changes it's spots.


Well to be fair on Homeopathy it never actually poisoned anyone and in retrospect is now considered successful because it at least gave your immune system a chance to be beat any infections without the help of mercury injections or being bled to death by leeches.
still we now know better and it's bunk. Jenny McCarthy should just shut her fat stupid mouth and f**k off.
 
2013-05-10 05:58:44 AM  

chrylis: Nice try.  I'm not frightened of genetic engineering generally, and I'm usually the one pointing out that humans have been selectively breeding and even crossbreeding for millennia


Then why are you afraid of technology that has been developed and used since the late 1950s? Curious, this...

chrylis: but it seems to me that if we're going to have a massive bureaucracy telling us what sorts of things we can and can't put in our body regardless of how well-informed we are, at least direct insertions from crops humans haven't traditionally consumed should have some level of eye kept on them.


Except that GMO crops that are used for human consumption  have to be approved by the FDA through their vetting process.

chrylis: But was that because of the FDA?  I'm perfectly interested in seeing evidence to that effect, but just like air and water were on a dramatically cleaner trajectory well before the Clean Stuff Acts were passed, and federal and state statutory regulations may actually have interfered with getting some waterways cleaned up, increased prosperity and public awareness were already driving improvements in food safety at that time.


Yes.

Yes, I can.

Please observe. And go read a damn history textbook. Your statement that "things were on a better trajectory" is demonstrably false with even a cursory review of the literature of the time. Patent drugs were legally sold which claimed to outright cure X and Y, and did nothing of the sort while containing toxic ingredients, like arsenic, cyanide, and industrial chemicals which were fatal to the people that took them, or contained addicting substances like Cocaine or Heroin.

www.ushistoryscene.com

chrylis: Furthermore, how do you account for the harm done by preventing safe, effective medical treatments from being made available in the United States because I can't choose to use unapproved drugs at my own risk like I can use non-UL electronics?


Because of Elixir of Sulfanilamide and Thalidomide. Among others. And what you are describing amounts to pseudoscientific research on your own body, which is utterly meaningless and unethical.
 
2013-05-10 06:11:55 AM  
Was it safe for the Radium Girls who only worked from 9 to 5?
 
2013-05-10 06:20:31 AM  
Science, in terms of industry, seems to follow a trend with some things like this.

1.  Discover something new
2.  Exploit it with industry in every product possible
2a.  Profit
3.  Discover later that it's dangerous as all Fark
4.  Get the government to regulate it's existence, and have it banned.
5.  Find something new to replace it
6.  Wash, rinse, wipe hands on pants, repeat.

Radiation is just one thing.  Lead is probably #2 on the list.  At least those are natural.  CFCs, and some of the toxic gases we've created are anything but natural.
 
2013-05-10 06:31:53 AM  
img5.xooimage.com
 
2013-05-10 06:47:17 AM  
Why am I reading about this on FARK instead of Raddit?
 
2013-05-10 06:56:28 AM  
"What were we thinking?"  SUPERPOWERS!!!!
 
2013-05-10 07:01:19 AM  
In the next century I wonder what they will be asking that question about. Antibiotics probably.
 
2013-05-10 07:06:46 AM  
If I recall correctly, the idea was that radioactivity was the amazing missing nutrient that made spring water so wonderful but eluded attempts to bottle it.  Don't worry, our generations is probably doing something like this too, but we simply don't know about it yet.
 
2013-05-10 07:09:41 AM  

big pig peaches: In the next century I wonder what they will be asking that question about. Antibiotics probably.


Except that, unlike gratuitous and non targeted use of radiation, antibiotics have literally saved trillions of lives around the world.

In 1900, 5 of the 10 top causes of Death in the United States were from infectious disease.

In 1939, when Antibiotics began to be widely used, but before the widespread use of Penicillin, Pneumonia was still the 5th leading cause of Death.
 
2013-05-10 07:16:54 AM  
It wasn't that long ago that we all thought Oat Bran was good for us, and then all those yuppies died of Carnivorous Colon Weasels.
 
2013-05-10 07:20:17 AM  
And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.
 
2013-05-10 07:22:41 AM  

big pig peaches: In the next century I wonder what they will be asking that question about. Antibiotics probably.


If it's antibiotics, there won't be anyone left to ask those questions.
 
2013-05-10 07:35:06 AM  
*reads headline*

So, germ-free end to end?
 
2013-05-10 07:36:57 AM  

StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.


It is?  Not in any way I can think of, either pure ion fluoride or the fluoride salts we use in public water supplies.
 
2013-05-10 07:44:39 AM  
What were are we thinking?

i41.tinypic.com
 
2013-05-10 07:51:03 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org

Shoe Fluoroscope. Just in case your kid is lying about the shoes fitting just so he can get out of the damn shoe store.
http://www.museumofquackery.com/devices/shoexray.htm
 
2013-05-10 07:56:26 AM  

StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.


Shut up, mandrake.
 
2013-05-10 07:59:04 AM  

StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.


You may want to stop listening to your crazy uncle Frank and his nutty conspiracy theories.
 
2013-05-10 08:04:06 AM  
img1.etsystatic.com

Uranium really picks up your morning cup of coffee
 
2013-05-10 08:04:28 AM  

chrylis: if we're going to have a massive bureaucracy telling us what sorts of things we can and can't put in our body regardless of how well-informed we are



That's not what the FDA does.  The FDA tells companies what they may or may not sell for profit under the guise of a beneficial product, and how it must be labeled for consumer information.

If you personally still want to go eat a handful of radium pellets, the FDA doesn't give a crap.
 
2013-05-10 08:05:11 AM  

Oldiron_79: See what happens when people blindly believe science with religious zeal.


Um, no.  That's not what this article shows at all.
 
2013-05-10 08:07:42 AM  

StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.


I call BS: Fluorine occurs naturally on Earth exclusively in the form of its only stable isotope, 19F.
 
2013-05-10 08:07:49 AM  

UsikFark: pellies: Are you implying that no oversight has a better history?

Industry will voluntarily correct their actions after education about regulations. Companies large and small adhere to best practices.


You sound like you have never worked before
 
2013-05-10 08:07:54 AM  
I'm thinking that in a century we'll (well, "you", I'll be dead from shoe fluoroscopy) be saying the same kind of thing about GMO / Frankenfoods
"WTF were we thinking?"
 
2013-05-10 08:09:42 AM  
Why the hell do we need the FDA in our business? Food safety should be market driven. If a particular product turns out to cause rectal bleeding, bones loss, or chronic death, people will stop buying those products, and the companies will lose money. There is no company interested in killing their customers because dead/disabled customers don't buy their product. So it's in a company's best interest to produce the safest product possible. People didn't understand the dangers of radium back then. You can't fault a company for that. Are they supposed to do years of product safety testing on something no one understands while their competitor beats them to market?

Look at tabacco. At the time, it was believed to be good for you, according to science of the day. Many doctors agreed that it was actualy benificial. In the 50s, when people started to question the safety of cigarettes, the companies did the right thing, and hired doctors and scientists to test their product to see if it was safe, and they all found it was. Now that we know better, tobacco companies have taken steps to ensure a safer smoke, by adding filters and soothing menthol.
 
2013-05-10 08:12:36 AM  

bring to a festering boil: "Don't take our word for it. Ask this satisfied customer what he thinks."

"Arrrgh!"
[www.robertswartwood.com image 400x282]


Heeeeeeeepppppppp meeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee   heeeeeeeeeeeeeppppppppp meeeeeeeeeee
 
2013-05-10 08:13:09 AM  
Fearmongering at it's finest.

Here's a few other things that are still radioactive...
Granite (A trip to Washington DC is the equivalent of a chest x-ray which explains why our politicians are so damned stupid)
Orange ceramic glaze will give a geiger counter an aneurysm.
Your partner (yes, your sleeping partner gives you a significant dose or Potassium 40 radiation over an extended period of time.)
Space
Your basement
 
2013-05-10 08:23:10 AM  

computerguyUT: Fearmongering at it's finest.

Here's a few other things that are still radioactive...
Granite (A trip to Washington DC is the equivalent of a chest x-ray which explains why our politicians are so damned stupid)
Orange ceramic glaze will give a geiger counter an aneurysm.
Your partner (yes, your sleeping partner gives you a significant dose or Potassium 40 radiation over an extended period of time.)
Space
Your basement


living in Utah. nuclear tests from nevada irradiated the southwest significantly. bonus to those downwind from dugway, who got bioweapons, as well. ... and well, the brainwashing of the Church... this is a great place.
 
2013-05-10 08:24:44 AM  

computerguyUT: Fearmongering at it's finest.

Here's a few other things that are still radioactive...
Granite (A trip to Washington DC is the equivalent of a chest x-ray which explains why our politicians are so damned stupid)
Orange ceramic glaze will give a geiger counter an aneurysm.
Your partner (yes, your sleeping partner gives you a significant dose or Potassium 40 radiation over an extended period of time.)
Space
Your basement


Some Granite
Only the Fiestaware from the 40s
"over an extended period of time" can be applied to most things
I am not going into space
Some basements

You did the opposite of the article: over-pooh-poohed radiation. We have radiation in our environment all around us. Deliberately putting products designed to have a significant radioactive dose on or in your body is generally not a good idea.

Fun fact: alpha radiation is completely harmless if external to the body. Ingested, it is THE most dangerous radioactive particle.
 
2013-05-10 08:24:46 AM  
I wish they still sold these:
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2013-05-10 08:27:09 AM  

Lawnchair: StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.

It is?  Not in any way I can think of, either pure ion fluoride or the fluoride salts we use in public water supplies.


RoxtarRyan: StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.

You may want to stop listening to your crazy uncle Frank and his nutty conspiracy theories.


Fritriac: StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.

I call BS: Fluorine occurs naturally on Earth exclusively in the form of its only stable isotope, 19F.


You're all assuming that pure Fluoride is being used in the water and not Fluoride that came as a by-product of 1940s-50s atomic bomb manufacture.

hardinparamedic: StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.

Shut up, mandrake.


You get the Wins for recognizing the joke.
 
2013-05-10 08:27:45 AM  
I read the headline without the comma between chocolate and suppositories. I was briefly intrigued.
 
2013-05-10 08:28:10 AM  

scottydoesntknow: That's what you get for trusting items with this seal of approval:

[th08.deviantart.net image 407x403]


done in two
 
2013-05-10 08:31:16 AM  

MythDragon: Why the hell do we need the FDA in our business? Food safety should be market driven. If a particular product turns out to cause rectal bleeding, bones loss, or chronic death, people will stop buying those products, and the companies will lose money. There is no company interested in killing their customers because dead/disabled customers don't buy their product. So it's in a company's best interest to produce the safest product possible. People didn't understand the dangers of radium back then. You can't fault a company for that. Are they supposed to do years of product safety testing on something no one understands while their competitor beats them to market?

Look at tabacco. At the time, it was believed to be good for you, according to science of the day. Many doctors agreed that it was actualy benificial. In the 50s, when people started to question the safety of cigarettes, the companies did the right thing, and hired doctors and scientists to test their product to see if it was safe, and they all found it was. Now that we know better, tobacco companies have taken steps to ensure a safer smoke, by adding filters and soothing menthol.


see also: Chinese factory conditions. is this really where you want your son/daughter working. are these really the products you want to take?
 
2013-05-10 08:31:57 AM  
Science takes time. We are the test subjects.
 
2013-05-10 08:32:05 AM  
I had a relative who put the numbers on wrist-watches. She would have been a cousin of my grandmother. They would lick the paintbrush to get a fine twist. Her mouth glowed in the dark.
 
2013-05-10 08:34:25 AM  

docmattic: Why am I reading about this on FARK instead of Raddit?


on the part of your browser that has the 'http:// blah blah fark blah' you have to put 'reddit' instead, bro.
 
2013-05-10 08:35:01 AM  
This genuinely bothers me.  Back in the day when we were first getting out noggins around radiation, we could easily see all the benefits of it's uses but failed to have the caution and foresight to see it's negative effects.  We failed to see the negative effects of radiation, what is now known as one of the more dangerous things a human can encounter.  What other negative effects of new technology, chemicals, and other human-engineered substances have we overlooked for the sake of its supposed benefits?
 
2013-05-10 08:36:03 AM  

MythDragon: Why the hell do we need the FDA in our business? Food safety should be market driven. If a particular product turns out to cause rectal bleeding, bones loss, or chronic death, people will stop buying those products, and the companies will lose money. There is no company interested in killing their customers because dead/disabled customers don't buy their product. So it's in a company's best interest to produce the safest product possible. People didn't understand the dangers of radium back then. You can't fault a company for that. Are they supposed to do years of product safety testing on something no one understands while their competitor beats them to market?

Look at tabacco. At the time, it was believed to be good for you, according to science of the day. Many doctors agreed that it was actualy benificial. In the 50s, when people started to question the safety of cigarettes, the companies did the right thing, and hired doctors and scientists to test their product to see if it was safe, and they all found it was. Now that we know better, tobacco companies have taken steps to ensure a safer smoke, by adding filters and soothing menthol.


9.5/10. You are not quite Pocket Ninja, but no one can be.
 
2013-05-10 08:38:36 AM  

TheGogmagog: I wish they still sold these:
[encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 232x218]


you'd think they could come up with a way to paint those dials without giving radium jaw to a bunch of girls.
 
2013-05-10 08:39:30 AM  

hardinparamedic: big pig peaches: In the next century I wonder what they will be asking that question about. Antibiotics probably.

Except that, unlike gratuitous and non targeted use of radiation, antibiotics have literally saved trillions of lives around the world.

In 1900, 5 of the 10 top causes of Death in the United States were from infectious disease.

In 1939, when Antibiotics began to be widely used, but before the widespread use of Penicillin, Pneumonia was still the 5th leading cause of Death.


Meant to say antimicrobial...the antibacterial products.

Of course I could still  argue about prophylactic use of Antibiotics in cattles farming which is, how you put it "gratuitous and non targeted"
 
2013-05-10 08:41:04 AM  

MythDragon: Why the hell do we need the FDA in our business? Food safety should be market driven. If a particular product turns out to cause rectal bleeding, bones loss, or chronic death, people will stop buying those products, and the companies will lose money. There is no company interested in killing their customers because dead/disabled customers don't buy their product. So it's in a company's best interest to produce the safest product possible. People didn't understand the dangers of radium back then. You can't fault a company for that. Are they supposed to do years of product safety testing on something no one understands while their competitor beats them to market?

Look at tabacco. At the time, it was believed to be good for you, according to science of the day. Many doctors agreed that it was actualy benificial. In the 50s, when people started to question the safety of cigarettes, the companies did the right thing, and hired doctors and scientists to test their product to see if it was safe, and they all found it was. Now that we know better, tobacco companies have taken steps to ensure a safer smoke, by adding filters and soothing menthol.


Absolutely beautiful.

So, what if it causes explosive diarrhea with no prior warning?
 
2013-05-10 08:43:28 AM  
When I was a kid in the 1950s we used to mold and play with lead soldiers and balls of mercury.

It didn't do anything harmful to me.  It didn't do anything harmful to me.  It didn't do anything harmful to me.  It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me. It didn't do anything harmful to me.
 
2013-05-10 08:44:20 AM  
lh3.googleusercontent.com

For the young scientist...
 
2013-05-10 08:46:11 AM  
Well of course you need radioactivity in toothpaste. How else would you get your teeth to glow like this?

img.fark.net
 
2013-05-10 08:53:41 AM  

No Time To Explain: Pointy Tail of Satan: And how we have homeopathy, chiropractors, and Jenny McCarthy to deal with. Bad crap never goes away, it just changes it's spots.

I kinda wish those clowns would do a revival of these relics of insanity/ignorance

/it would give many the glow the so deserve
//and free Darwin Award for any customers
///11th purchase is free


Colloidal silver. Many quack "doctors" still push this crap. It actually turns your skin blue grey if you take too much.
 
2013-05-10 08:54:05 AM  

StrikitRich: You're all assuming that pure Fluoride is being used in the water and not Fluoride that came as a by-product of 1940s-50s atomic bomb manufacture.


The longest lived synthetic isotope of fluorine is 18Fl, half-life of 110 minutes. After 50 years, we're talking 2^(-239,000) concentrations.

 For comparison's sake, if the entire visible universe (~10^82 molecules, give or take a few orders of magnitude) were made of  18Fl atoms, we'd expect there to be no  18Fl atoms anywhere in roughly 21 days.
 
2013-05-10 08:54:14 AM  
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-05-10 09:01:52 AM  

big pig peaches: Of course I could still  argue about prophylactic use of Antibiotics in cattles farming which is, how you put it "gratuitous and non targeted"


Agree completely.
 
2013-05-10 09:04:16 AM  

DubtodaIll: This genuinely bothers me.  Back in the day when we were first getting out noggins around radiation, we could easily see all the benefits of it's uses but failed to have the caution and foresight to see it's negative effects.  We failed to see the negative effects of radiation, what is now known as one of the more dangerous things a human can encounter.  What other negative effects of new technology, chemicals, and other human-engineered substances have we overlooked for the sake of its supposed benefits?


The over 300 toxic chemicals used in fracking.
 
2013-05-10 09:11:27 AM  

UsikFark: pellies: Are you implying that no oversight has a better history?

Industry will voluntarily correct their actions after education about regulations. Companies large and small adhere to best practices.


The best practices you speak of are the ones best for making money.
 
2013-05-10 09:11:36 AM  
What about using x-ray machines to fit shoes. Don't worry, Dr. Al knows what he's doing:


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-05-10 09:13:28 AM  

UsikFark: Cases like NECC are supposed to be reminders of the oddball stuff people do despite the gov't's regulations.


Yeah, their wafers suck.
 
2013-05-10 09:14:00 AM  

MythDragon: Look at tabacco. At the time, it was believed to be good for you, according to science of the day.


Have you not reason then to bee ashamed, and to forbeare this filthie noveltie, so basely grounded, so foolishly received and so grossely mistaken in the right use thereof? In your abuse thereof sinning against God, harming your selves both in persons and goods, and raking also thereby the markes and notes of vanitie upon you: by the custome thereof making your selves to be wondered at by all forraine civil Nations, and by all strangers that come among you, to be scorned and contemned. A custome lothsome to the eye, hatefull to the Nose, harmefull to the braine, dangerous to the Lungs, and in the blacke stinking fume thereof, neerest resembling the horrible Stigian smoke of the pit that is bottomelesse.
James VI and I, A Counterblaste to Tobacco, 1604.

/I saw what you did there, by the way.
 
2013-05-10 09:26:06 AM  
Hmmm, so now the 20th century is being all lumped together and taken as a whole. We went from Rickety airplanes to landing on the moon and permanent space stations during those 100 years. The headline just struck me, that by saying "last century" it could have happened in 1999 and not pre-1945. Big difference.
 
2013-05-10 09:29:48 AM  
Suppositories?
Well bite my shiny flesh ass.
 
2013-05-10 10:04:00 AM  
I have carried a tritium powered light on my keychain for the last eight years.

/had a radium dial watch for a good part of my geeky youth
//had a bag of uranium sand in my underwear drawer from about 1980-1993
 
2013-05-10 10:10:36 AM  

PC LOAD LETTER: 9.5/10. You are not quite Pocket Ninja, but no one can be.


I also hope to one day sit at the big boy table with spentmiles


hardinparamedic:
So, what if it causes explosive diarrhea with no prior warning?


How does a company think the side effect of "anal leakage" is okay?

From the internet (I forget the origins):
DO NOT EAT PRINGLES FAT FREE POTATO CHIPS. THEY WILL GREASE YOUR ASS.
Don't even farking say a word. I like potato chips, and can't eat them very much or I'll get fat.

I tried out these Pringles Fat-Free chips because they were super low-cal. BBQ flavor. the fark.

The can said they had 70 calories per serving, which meant the whole can had 490 calories inside total. I could munch through a can in a day with my lunch, dinner, etc. So I got several cans, and began enjoying one a day for the past four days. But what they dont farking tell you...

Except in tiny print you cant read without a farking electron microscope

...is that the primary ingredient is something called "olean" which I have since learned is Latin for "Unwashable & Indestructible Ass Grease."

Oh Yeah. I'm not even kidding.

So today, while I'm standing in the living room debating whether or not Laundry or Dishes will get done first, I get the urge to fart. I live alone, so sweet. I let the honk loose and its wrong. Something just sounded wrong. I know my own wind, and I have never farted a sound that sounded like a fart wrapped in a pillow.

Oh yes, something was very wrong. I had just shat myself. But this evil olean makes shiatting yourself sound almost like a regular fart, and had I not been particularly attentive, it could easily have gone unnoticed, I'm telling you. THAT's how utterly covert and evil this olean stuff is. What the fark?! What if I'd gone out to hang with friends or gone for a drive, what then?

So I walk carefully to the bathroom and disrobe. before I even sit on the toilet, I wad paper and carefully wipe from the front. Sure enough, it was light brown, and had the texture of soft spackle. You farking Pringle bastards.

I sat down and pushed a bit, and lo, out came a jet that I didnt even feel an urge for one minute earlier. It piled in the bowl like brown marshmallow fluff.

The problem rose when I tried to wipe. I went through a whole farking roll of TP and could not get it all off me. So.

I jumped in the shower. Yep, its gross, but it had to be done. There I stood, water pouring down, cheeks spread, and using my own hand to make certain I'm clean.

That was when I discovered that after using my hand to wipe myself (before I soaped the area) my hand came back covered in some sort of transparent grease. It was so farking foul. The grease made water bead off my hand. It was tacky too, and very difficult to manage.

So I grabbed the bar of saop and went to work.

You farking Pringle bastards.

The bar of soap came away coated in grease as well, and would no longer wash. I had to turn the water to hot and massage the soap for five minutes to get it to the point where I could use it again. It took me an hour to get the farking grease off my pucker. I shudder to think of what its doing INSIDE ME right now, but I will damned sure never eat that shiat again.
 
2013-05-10 10:10:57 AM  

ElPresidente: You can still have fun with radioactivity today.  Go out and buy a big bag of Brazil nuts (which are seeds BTW, not nuts) and take them with you in your pocket to the visitors centre of any nuclear power plant and watch what happens - Brazil nuts are naturally radioactive and have a half-life of 1.2 billion years - you'll be saying "unplanned scrub shower" before you know it.  Bananas are also radioactive but not quite as likely to set off radiation alarms.


If the isotope has a half life of 1.2 billion years, it's not going to set off too many alarms, is it?  From what I can tell brazil nuts contain radium, which has a half life of 1601 years per wikipedia.
 
2013-05-10 10:12:07 AM  
Radioactive products from the last century: toothpaste, chocolate, suppositories.

s3.amazonaws.com
This looks like it could fit up your ass.

/or down it
//whatever
///Choco Ass-Paste: for that healthy glow that says you just started an anti-Putin radio station
 
2013-05-10 10:28:56 AM  
And yet we still voluntarily ingest flouride 

Fritriac: StrikitRich: And today we continue to pollute our precious bodily fluids with fluoride, which is slightly radioactive.

I call BS: Fluorine occurs naturally on Earth exclusively in the form of its only stable isotope, 19F.


Yes, because anything that occurs naturally on Earth is safe for human consumption.
 
2013-05-10 10:30:17 AM  
assets.shitbrix.com

Farking Fark Filter.
I had a cool animated .gif and everything.
 
2013-05-10 10:39:00 AM  

patentguy: If the isotope has a half life of 1.2 billion years, it's not going to set off too many alarms, is it?  From what I can tell brazil nuts contain radium, which has a half life of 1601 years per wikipedia.


On the former, carry a pea-sized amount of depleted uranium (half-life more like 4 billion years), and you'll certainly be noticed visiting a reactor.  But, yeah, brazil nuts really concentrate radium from not-especially-concentrated soils, and the exact why-and-how is a really interesting question for engineering bioremediation of other heavy element contaminants.
 
2013-05-10 10:43:05 AM  
A while back I bought some uranium doped marbles

they look like this under blacklight
www.blacklightworld.com.

Supposedly they are safe to handle. And it was popular a while back to use uranium doping in glass to give it a yellow color. I'm not sure what I will ever do with these, but I figure I can put a handful in my pocket before a date to act as a contriceptive.
 
2013-05-10 10:46:01 AM  

Zenith:
Well to be fair on Homeopathy it never actually poisoned anyone


Well, you could drown.
 
2013-05-10 10:55:35 AM  

hardinparamedic: big pig peaches: In the next century I wonder what they will be asking that question about. Antibiotics probably.

Except that, unlike gratuitous and non targeted use of radiation, antibiotics have literally saved trillions of lives around the world.

In 1900, 5 of the 10 top causes of Death in the United States were from infectious disease.

In 1939, when Antibiotics began to be widely used, but before the widespread use of Penicillin, Pneumonia was still the 5th leading cause of Death.


Not to undercut your point, but that should be billions (or, at least, millions), not trillions--there have only been several billion people born since 1900. ...and apparently folks estimate that we haven't even hit the 1 trillion mark in total humans ever to have lived.

/come on, everybody--help bring up that sad, low, 108 billion figure!
 
2013-05-10 11:04:09 AM  

StrikitRich: You're all assuming that pure Fluoride is being used in the water and not Fluoride that came as a by-product of 1940s-50s atomic bomb manufacture.


I hadn't heard that one before, although I suppose it's possible that some of the leftover fluorine from UF6 enrichment plants etc. might have ended up in drinking water. Usually the concern is about fluoride which is added to water as hexafluorosilicic acid, a byproduct of phosphate fertilizer manufacturing. The rocks from which that fertilizer is extracted also contain natural radioisotopes, some of which can follow the fluoride through the extraction process and end up in the final product.
 
2013-05-10 11:11:35 AM  

MythDragon: PC LOAD LETTER: 9.5/10. You are not quite Pocket Ninja, but no one can be.

I also hope to one day sit at the big boy table with spentmiles


hardinparamedic: So, what if it causes explosive diarrhea with no prior warning?


How does a company think the side effect of "anal leakage" is okay?

From the internet (I forget the origins):
DO NOT EAT PRINGLES FAT FREE POTATO CHIPS. THEY WILL GREASE YOUR ASS.
Don't even farking say a word. I like potato chips, and can't eat them very much or I'll get fat.

I tried out these Pringles Fat-Free chips because they were super low-cal. BBQ flavor. the fark.

The can said they had 70 calories per serving, which meant the whole can had 490 calories inside total. I could munch through a can in a day with my lunch, dinner, etc. So I got several cans, and began enjoying one a day for the past four days. But what they dont farking tell you...

Except in tiny print you cant read without a farking electron microscope

...is that the primary ingredient is something called "olean" which I have since learned is Latin for "Unwashable & Indestructible Ass Grease."

Oh Yeah. I'm not even kidding.

So today, while I'm standing in the living room debating whether or not Laundry or Dishes will get done first, I get the urge to fart. I live alone, so sweet. I let the honk loose and its wrong. Something just sounded wrong. I know my own wind, and I have never farted a sound that sounded like a fart wrapped in a pillow.

Oh yes, something was very wrong. I had just shat myself. But this evil olean makes shiatting yourself sound almost like a regular fart, and had I not been particularly attentive, it could easily have gone unnoticed, I'm telling you. THAT's how utterly covert and evil this olean stuff is. What the fark?! What if I'd gone out to hang with friends or gone for a drive, what then?

So I walk carefully to the bathroom and disrobe. before I even sit on the toilet, I wad paper and carefully wipe from the front. Sure enough, it was light b ...


Now this is Pocket Ninja territory
 
2013-05-10 11:14:01 AM  

Suburban Decay: Now this is Pocket Ninja Spent Miles territory


FTFM...
 
2013-05-10 11:24:06 AM  
Only two nuclear suppositories were ever built, and we gave both to Japan.
 
2013-05-10 11:25:18 AM  

Suburban Decay: Suburban Decay: Now this is  Spent Miles territory

FTFM...


No, not quite, because his tales usualy end with "unwanted" buttsechs.
 
2013-05-10 11:28:27 AM  
I live near where most of the uranium in this country was mined and processed.

The offspring of those workers are not ... right. That's all I'm gonna say. Other than the processing mill gave away millions of yards of 'free' fill dirt for decades.

Yes, my petunias glow in the dark.
 
2013-05-10 11:29:29 AM  
The FDA  is looking into those anti-bacterial hand soaps. Someone did the math that the .1% that do survive are pretty bad ass.
 
2013-05-10 11:37:53 AM  

Tom_Slick: [img1.etsystatic.com image 570x428]

Uranium really picks up your morning cup of coffee


The worst thing about Fiestaware wasn't the uranium, which stayed pretty much in place, but the lead in the paint that would leach into the food you were eating and would permanently dissolve you mind.

The picture of the Revigator they had wasn't very good.  There were some really rare, early Revigators that came before this, but the classic Revigator had a small metal stand and a lid.  You can just barely see the stand at the bottom of this one that's selling on eBay for a little under $300.  The picture makes it look a little lighter in color than it really is.
i43.tinypic.com
Later in the 1920s they came up with a pure-white Revigator.  This Revigator had stubby legs that was just an extension of the pot and a black, oval sticker was near the top.
farm7.staticflickr.com
One of these days I'd like to own a classic Revigator but every time I see one on eBay I think, "Aren't there better things you could do with $250 than buy a radioactive samovar?"

One thing the article missed was Depression Glass (made during the Great Depression) or Vaseline Glass because it was someone transparent.  It has a little uranium in it for color.
farm6.staticflickr.com
farm9.staticflickr.com
Yes it's green but it doesn't really glow unless you put a blacklight on it.
 
2013-05-10 12:20:45 PM  
img.gawkerassets.com

Get next to Nutex!
 
2013-05-10 01:19:59 PM  
 
2013-05-10 02:13:50 PM  
Have your local hospital for the very first heart  test put a 30 day half life gamma emitting isotope in your veins
and just call it a stress test. Hospital gets paid big for the expensive test you may or may not need-you may or may not get a cancer down the road. They have been doing this for a long time but have not done a study of "down the road issues ". Hmmmm....
Years from now they'll say how stupid we were.
Oh- and lets not forget the generla electrico CAT machines that were way over radiating patients.
 
2013-05-10 02:17:24 PM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: It wasn't that long ago that we all thought Oat Bran was good for us, and then all those yuppies died of Carnivorous Colon Weasels.


encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com

You called?

/yes, I know it was a horrible rendition of the book.
//still was damn scary.
 
2013-05-10 02:22:56 PM  
mmm radioactive chocolate suppositories, makes you poop bombs and tastes great 2
 
2013-05-10 04:31:13 PM  
UF6IA?
 
2013-05-10 06:00:54 PM  
communicategood.files.wordpress.com

madartlab.com
 
2013-05-10 08:56:19 PM  
i4.ebayimg.com
I've got one of these.
 
2013-05-10 10:47:40 PM  

Phil Moskowitz: There are a lot of camera lenses that exhibit non-trivial amounts of radiation as well. Not something you want to have glued to your eye for long periods of time.



Thoriated lenses went out a few decades ago, and even then it was well researched and viewed as not really a problem.
 
2013-05-11 01:12:29 AM  

simplicimus: The FDA  is looking into those anti-bacterial hand soaps. Someone did the math that the .1% that do survive are pretty bad ass.


There a difference between antibiotics and anti-bacterial.

Mutation against antibiotics is the danger, not chemical anti-bacterials: you can't mutate a defense against chemical attack like bleach or chlorhexadine.

Things like c.diff are already chemically resistant to things like alcohol in hand sanitizer which kills of good bacteria and antibodies leaving c.diff in relative higher concentration.
 
m00
2013-05-11 02:14:14 AM  
you guys realize in a hundred years there is going to be one of these about high fructose corn syrup, HGH in beef, and aspartame.
 
Displayed 124 of 124 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report