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(Some Food Nut)   Fark Food Thread: How do you make the most of seasonal fruit? Is there a recipe you wait all year to put to use when the right goodies come into season? What other fruit-focused recipes will wow us?   (uktv.co.uk) divider line 173
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1669 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 May 2013 at 4:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-09 06:09:34 PM

praxcelis: An annual tradition in our house when peaches are in season:

...
3 or 4 boneless skinless chicken pieces, cooked, cooled and shredded
...


Preview fail.  Don't cook 3 or 4 chickens.
 
2013-05-09 06:11:26 PM

missmez: griffer: Mmmmmm.....seasonal fruit? Like Shamrock shakes?

Or maybe rooty-tooty fruity ritas?

I like an ice cold zimmer with a shot of cahmbord and a kirshwassser shot to go with the thong dancers at the Silverado!

WOOO! WORK THAT BANANA!

You sound like you're drunk right now.  At the very least.


SQUIBBLY DOO!
 
2013-05-09 06:13:11 PM
All I know is between the four of us (wife, me, daughter and SIL), we go through a hell of a lot of bananas or plantains. Never out of season.. Cereals, oatmeal, whatever.
Strawberry season here in FL is a big deal, too.
 
2013-05-09 06:15:18 PM

Mark Ratner: All this food talk is making me hungry. I think I'll fire up the grill this evening and have a t-bone cooked well done and smothered in A-1 steak sauce and catsup.


10/10. You will get some bites off of that
 
2013-05-09 06:17:19 PM

biatchqueen: 10/10. You will get some bites off of that


Why?  That sounds disgusting and he has the taste of a philistine!  A1 sucks.  I prefer HP.
 
2013-05-09 06:22:05 PM

Skleenar: biatchqueen: 10/10. You will get some bites off of that

Why?  That sounds disgusting and he has the taste of a philistine!  A1 sucks.  I prefer HP.


HP?  Jesus, haven't you people ever heard of mayonnaise?  That's what makes a steak, a steak.
 
2013-05-09 06:22:57 PM
How do you make the most of seasonal fruit?

Ignore them?
 
2013-05-09 06:24:28 PM

basemetal: [farm5.staticflickr.com image 640x480]
[farm5.staticflickr.com image 640x480]

[farm8.staticflickr.com image 480x640]


images1.wikia.nocookie.net

/those are not fruits
 
2013-05-09 06:26:01 PM

Skleenar: biatchqueen: 10/10. You will get some bites off of that

Why?  That sounds disgusting and he has the taste of a philistine!  A1 sucks.  I prefer HP.


HP.  They'll give you the steak, but they'll make it up on overpriced sauce.
 
2013-05-09 06:29:51 PM

New Age Redneck:    Huckleberries.

/smoothie
//pancakes
///in apple crisp
//by the handful......
/basemetal....that looks very similar to the salsa I make.....great minds......:D


Those berries look great but I'm admiring your backpack. :)
 
2013-05-09 06:30:03 PM
I'm really boring: strawberry shortcake, then blueberry pie.
 
2013-05-09 06:30:07 PM
I carve them into a shotglass, drink Everclear out of them, then discard.

Blueberries are the hardest to work with.
 
2013-05-09 06:30:15 PM

EngineerBoy: peach


Hell yes..... I love you.
 
2013-05-09 06:32:27 PM

Jekylman: Everything gets its own pie. And sometimes you do mixes to get hybrid pies, like lime-lilikoi meringue pie.

Also, any fresh fruit works well in a marinade.


Where do you shop for lilikoi? I've only had it in Hawaii and I can't find it anywhere! :(
 
2013-05-09 06:33:34 PM

lennavan: [foodchowdown.com image 390x261]


yes, but only when in season, which is not now for either basil or tomatoes is it?
 
2013-05-09 06:34:27 PM
I prefer my fruit raw, so:

Strawberries in a spinach salad (with bell pepper, tomato, and feta- dressed with lavender balsamic vinegar and meyer lemon infused olive oil).

However, what's better than raw fruit? Why, alcohol infused with fruit, of course. It's easy.

1.) Buy fruit (I did cantaloupe.)
2.) Buy clear alcohol ( I did gin. You can do darker alcohols, but I haven't.)
3.) Put in mason jar
4.) Shake a few times a day, taste once a day
5.) Take out fruit and strain sediment
6.) Enjoy in drink or by itself

It look about 3 days for the cantaloupe to develop a good flavor. There are guides online on how long certain things take to infuse, on average.
 
2013-05-09 06:40:24 PM

amyldoanitrite: 1. Pick bucket of fruit.

2. Juice it.

3. Add brown sugar or honey until SG = 1.08ish

4. Aerate well. Dump in primary fermenter.

5. Add 1 packet of Lalvin EC-1118 champagne yeast and attach airlock.

6. Wait a couple weeks until FG bottoms out. (Usually ~0.996)


If you stop at this point, you could also then proceed to heat the mixture to about 185F. If there was some way to cool the steam that boils off- maybe with a air- or water- cooled tube of some sort, you would have taken a certain "something" from your mixture. You would have distilled it down to its essence.

Allegedly.
 
2013-05-09 06:46:48 PM
Okey dokey, here is recipes:

From Devil Babe's Big Book of Fun by Isabel Samaras, here's the Ruby Demon recipe:

2 cups sugar
2 pints raspberries
1 quart/liter vodka [I recommend Skyy or Absolut, but it's your own preference, natch]

Clean the raspberries carefully.

Pour the booze into a 3-quart glass container with a lid, add sugar, add raspberries.
Seal the cover shut and stick it in a dark place for at least two months.
Every week, open it up and give it a stir.

When ready to use, strain it into a properly awesome bottle and serve.

I had a small (200 ml) test batch that I left alone inadvertently from 2008 to 2011
and holy hells it was fantastic once I cracked it open.

Now for some plums.

Be damned if I recall where I got this plum sauce recipe....

You need to have previously made a batch of plum preserves.

To a 12 ounce sample of plum preserves, add:

2 TBL vinegar
1 TBL brown sugar
1 TBL finely minced onion
1 tsp finely crushed, seeded, dried red chilli pepper
1 clove garlic, minced

Combine all in saucepan. Bring mixture to boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat.

Put in jar, cover and refrigerate overnight to blend flavours.

If you can find "soybean paste", serve this along with the plum sauce as something to mix into it.

I do have a jar of "Chinese Bean Paste" marked with Haitai America, product of Korea that I picked up from a Korean grocer....ahh, I think WAY MORE THAN FIVE YEARS AGO and my gods that shiat has got a ridiculously long shelf life cuz it is kept in the fridge. I've used half of it.
 
2013-05-09 06:46:53 PM

electronsexparty: I prefer my fruit raw, so:

Strawberries in a spinach salad (with bell pepper, tomato, and feta- dressed with lavender balsamic vinegar and meyer lemon infused olive oil).

However, what's better than raw fruit? Why, alcohol infused with fruit, of course. It's easy.

1.) Buy fruit (I did cantaloupe.)
2.) Buy clear alcohol ( I did gin. You can do darker alcohols, but I haven't.)
3.) Put in mason jar
4.) Shake a few times a day, taste once a day
5.) Take out fruit and strain sediment
6.) Enjoy in drink or by itself

It look about 3 days for the cantaloupe to develop a good flavor. There are guides online on how long certain things take to infuse, on average.


Vodka + tomato + cracked black pepper + about 2 -3 weeks = a pretty good base for bloody marys.
 
2013-05-09 06:50:20 PM

Kittypie070: I do have a jar of "Chinese Bean Paste" marked with Haitai America, product of Korea that I picked up from a Korean grocer....ahh, I think WAY MORE THAN FIVE YEARS AGO and my gods that shiat has got a ridiculously long shelf life cuz it is kept in the fridge. I've used half of it.


It's like Japanese miso.  It's partially fermented so any nasty critters are quite dead now, thank you.  In those types of bean preparations the salt content is usually high enough to mummify a pet.
 
2013-05-09 06:50:22 PM
Cherry pie made from Michigan sour cherries. Vine ripened watermelon, cantaloupes or honeydews, just eaten plain and still warm from the sunshine.
 
2013-05-09 06:51:23 PM
this is fruit-related.

http://youtu.be/xdfMu77sYH4
 
2013-05-09 06:59:40 PM
Recipe for what my grandmother called ambrosia. It's time consuming but great

Peel six naval oranges and cut out the pulp from each section and place sections in bowl

Core and slice 3 apples with skin on. Juice from orange sections will keep apples from turning brown

Slice 20 red grapes in half and add to mixture

Cut up honey dew melon and cantalope and add to mixture

Add 3/4 cup of coarsely chopped walnuts

Grate a quarter of a fresh coconut and sprinkle on top. (Coconut in package is too sweet and not good. Omit if no fresh coconut available

Cover and chill

Real whipped cream on top is also nice
 
2013-05-09 07:03:41 PM
Wait-until-they're-ripe local strawberries,
a touch of salt,
a sprinkling of sugar or sweetener,
andthat'sallyouneed...yum!
 
2013-05-09 07:19:55 PM
Pear slices on pizza. No, really.

Actually I don't do it, these guys do. Pears, gorgonzola, mushrooms, red onions, chopped walnuts.
 
2013-05-09 07:24:19 PM
All I'm saying is my parents grow blackberries and since they get so many in such a short time they just lay them flat on cookie sheets and freeze them, once they are frozen put them in bags. You can just thaw them in the fridge and have plenty to have them once a week until the next year. Best use is blackberry cobbler which I am the maker of. I do the kind where you cook the blackberries into a hot syrupy goodness in a cast iron pan and then put the (biscuit/pie type, not cake type) dough in lumps over the top and put it in the oven. If you don't have a cast iron you can make your syrup goodness in any pan and then pour it in a backing dish.

You can freeze blueberries or strawberries if you are able to grow a ton. For harder fruits like apples- they should last months on their own... or you could always can them into apple pie filling.
 

Other notes about fruit: Never make applesauce. Takes too long, just not worth it. Most of the other fruit we just eat plain- it is just too freaking good to bother putting it into a recipe- I mean adding sugar to freshly grown (already delicious) fruit is pointless- save that shiat for bad tasting winter-bought store fruit.
 
2013-05-09 07:24:34 PM
I'm just curious as to why Fark is farming recipes from folks - is there an upcoming book?
 
2013-05-09 07:25:36 PM

Sensei: Our apricot trees flowered so beautifully this year -- I hope we get a crop.  Last year, due to the early thaw, we had bupkis.  Canned apricots, apricot jam, dried apricots -- they are so darn expensive up here, even in season, I love growing our own.  We apple, peach, pear and plum trees, too, but the apricots are my favorite.  Apricot brandy cake.


You can grow apricots in Michigan?  Who knew...

/wife's family in Cali had a small orchard, always cited it as supporting evidence for Cali's coolness
 
2013-05-09 07:29:46 PM
Strawberry Tiramisu

Basically a cross between Strawberry shortcake and classic Tiramisu, with the coffee and liquor replaced with rum and the juice from macerating the strawberries.
 
2013-05-09 07:33:11 PM
Oh, and since tomatoes are techinically a fruit: mozzarella a la caprese and pizza marhgerita and BLTs and tomato sandwiches.
 
2013-05-09 07:34:46 PM

iwantamonkey: This is timely because just this weekend we picked up six punnets of strawberries. I have started the ice cream base (will put it in the ice cream maker tonight), I am going to add roasted strawberries to that. With the eight egg whites left over from the ice cream I made a pavlova (topped with strawberries. For the other four pounds of strawberries I will make JAM. yay!


I've never heard of a pavlova before but the ones online look amazing. I'm going to make one this weekend.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-05-09 07:35:00 PM
Summer Pudding.
 
2013-05-09 07:38:39 PM
Also for those of you who grow a lot of herbs, you can always throw the stalks/stems onto the coals when grilling to get some good smelling smoke.  Rosemary and garlic scapes go well with chicken.
 
2013-05-09 07:39:42 PM

praxcelis: electronsexparty: I prefer my fruit raw, so:

Strawberries in a spinach salad (with bell pepper, tomato, and feta- dressed with lavender balsamic vinegar and meyer lemon infused olive oil).

However, what's better than raw fruit? Why, alcohol infused with fruit, of course. It's easy.

1.) Buy fruit (I did cantaloupe.)
2.) Buy clear alcohol ( I did gin. You can do darker alcohols, but I haven't.)
3.) Put in mason jar
4.) Shake a few times a day, taste once a day
5.) Take out fruit and strain sediment
6.) Enjoy in drink or by itself

It look about 3 days for the cantaloupe to develop a good flavor. There are guides online on how long certain things take to infuse, on average.

Vodka + tomato + cracked black pepper + about 2 -3 weeks = a pretty good base for bloody marys.


I did jalapeño/tomato vodka and it was great in a Bloody Mary. I like your idea of pepper and tomato; that sounds yummy.
 
2013-05-09 07:49:14 PM
www.trendir.com

So good your face will implode.
 
2013-05-09 07:55:20 PM
Can't wait to get to the farmer's market for the fresh vegetables as they come in. This one goes back generations in my family for making. It's a southern traditional dish with a kick.

"Chow Chow"

http://www.pickyourown.org/SouthernChowChow.htm
 
2013-05-09 08:15:31 PM
Fruit Crumble

3 - 4 C fruit
2/3 C brown sugar
1/2 C flour (I use whole wheat)
2/3 C quick cooking oats
1/3 C butter @ room temperature
1/8 tsp salt
3/4 tsp cinnamon if desired.

Put fruit in 8" square pan, berries go in whole, slice rhubarb, apples, peaches etc.
Mix remaining ingredients well and sprinkle over fruit. Bake 30 min. @375 deg.
Can also be microwaved on high for 7-10 min. then let it stand 10 more minutes.
Great served warm with ice cream.
 
2013-05-09 08:26:13 PM
The only seasonal fruit I use that hasn't been mentioned yet is gooseberries. I've been growing them for 4 yrs, the first year there wasn't any fruit, next year just enough to make 2 small gooseberry tarts (poached gooseberries on top of a cheesecake-like filling, glazed with brandy and apricot jelly), last year I got my first jam (mixed with raspberries and currants). This year, judging by the blossoms, I'll have enough for tarts AND jam.
I grow 31 varieties of berry, the gooseberries are my favorite.

/Real gooseberries (ribes), not the annual ones grown from seed...which are gross.
 
2013-05-09 08:54:16 PM
not a fruit, but definitely seasonal. Vidalia Onions! and they just hit the stores recently.

take one fist sized Vidalia. Cut top and bottom off. Peel skin. Repeat for each person eating dinner.
Put Vidalia in center of aluminum foil square, like you would for a baked potato.
wrap Vidalia with 2 slices of your favorite bacon.
on top of Vidalia, place heaping spoonful of brown sugar and 2 tblspns of butter. NOT MARGARINE! (bleah!)
salt and pepper lightly
close up foil loosely to top of Vidalia, like a Kewpie doll head, so that juices will stay inside.
bake at 375 degrees for at least 1 hour, or until soft.
place in bowl, open foil and discard.
slice it up and enjoy.
 
2013-05-09 09:09:32 PM
Blackberry wine is the best.
Huckleberry wine is also good.
Peach wine tastes like dried apricots.  I did not like it, but friends did.
 
2013-05-09 09:44:12 PM
Strawberries, strawberries, strawberries everywhere! My goal every harvest season is to eat so many strawberries I get sick of them. Nah... couldn't happen. Cherries are coming up next. My banana peppers are coming in droves but I guess they are not technically fruit.

Okay I have to get up and make some strawberry lemonade.
 
2013-05-09 10:15:30 PM

Thorny4Pie: Right now is the only time of year to make fresh Strawberry Rhubarb pie.  Frozen rhubarb is for heathens.  Only fresh picked will do.  I've got 6lbs on order being shipped from Wisconsin after it's picked on the 20th.  What I don't use in pie will be peeled, sprinkled with salt, and eaten raw.  I wait for rhubarb season like I wait for Stone Crab claw season.


Ever make stewed rhubarb?
Just cut-up stalks, a touch of water, and some sugar in a sauce pan. Cook and stir over low-medium until it breaks down, but stop cooking before it's totally mush.

Stewed rhubarb with a pork chop or bratwurst beats apple sauce six ways to Sunday.

And it's awesome over yogurt for breakfast, or with vanilla ice cream.
 
2013-05-09 10:40:52 PM
I make curd when citrus is in season. My favorites are meyer lemon and honeybelle orange. I freeze the curd and it keeps for close to a year so long as it is in the deep freeze and well packaged. I used the meyer lemons this year to make meyer limoncello. I added a basil leaf to each quart jar while it was steeping and that was a good decision.

Vidalia onion season I make onion jam, with thyme and stout. It is very good on rare roast beef or a steak sandwich, or spread on top of a slice of french bread toast with some blue cheese.

When berries are in season, I make jams and shrubs. I don't bother with jellies, too much work for an end result that is kind of blah. I do so love triple berry jam with cinnamon and vanilla. I also make infused vodka and infused evercelar with berries and herbs.

Apple season, I make apple butter with bourbon and cider. It is very tasty and generally disappears from my cupboards quickly, as most of my friends weasel away a jar or so when they stop by.

I make tomato jam, chutney, green tomato pickles, tomato pie, salsas, and marinara sauce, sun-dried tomatoes, whatever I'm in the mood for.

And with hot peppers I make candied peppers, sweet, hot, with a bunch of whole spices. Amazing with goat cheese or blue cheese or even cream cheese on wheat thins.

And when things are fresh, I cook with them. I have a decent garden and grow about 70 varieties each year, so I don't purchase much produce at all. It's either fresh from the garden, frozen by us, or otherwise preserved. The one thing i buy all winter is lettuce, because there really is no way to make that keep.
 
2013-05-09 10:44:46 PM

redslippers: I make curd when citrus is in season. My favorites are meyer lemon and honeybelle orange. I freeze the curd and it keeps for close to a year so long as it is in the deep freeze and well packaged. I used the meyer lemons this year to make meyer limoncello. I added a basil leaf to each quart jar while it was steeping and that was a good decision.

Vidalia onion season I make onion jam, with thyme and stout. It is very good on rare roast beef or a steak sandwich, or spread on top of a slice of french bread toast with some blue cheese.

When berries are in season, I make jams and shrubs. I don't bother with jellies, too much work for an end result that is kind of blah. I do so love triple berry jam with cinnamon and vanilla. I also make infused vodka and infused evercelar with berries and herbs.

Apple season, I make apple butter with bourbon and cider. It is very tasty and generally disappears from my cupboards quickly, as most of my friends weasel away a jar or so when they stop by.

I make tomato jam, chutney, green tomato pickles, tomato pie, salsas, and marinara sauce, sun-dried tomatoes, whatever I'm in the mood for.

And with hot peppers I make candied peppers, sweet, hot, with a bunch of whole spices. Amazing with goat cheese or blue cheese or even cream cheese on wheat thins.

And when things are fresh, I cook with them. I have a decent garden and grow about 70 varieties each year, so I don't purchase much produce at all. It's either fresh from the garden, frozen by us, or otherwise preserved. The one thing i buy all winter is lettuce, because there really is no way to make that keep.


Chutney recipes please!!!!
 
2013-05-09 10:51:35 PM
God Is My Co-Pirate:

Tried rosemary, oregano and basil.  I have the world's blackest thumbs.  Maybe it's worth another try.  I do love pesto.

Can't get rosemary to grow? I can't get rid of my rosemary plant.  I've DUG. IT. UP. three times, and it's three feet high by the end of the year.  Frickin weed.
 
2013-05-09 11:35:51 PM

FrancoFile: Chutney recipes please!!!!


This is my base; I adjust it as the mood strikes. I also use a pH meter to know how much acid to add for canning, and have found the amount of vinegar in this recipe works with pretty much every tweak I've attempted, so adding things to taste should be pretty safe.

4 lb.s tomatoes, peeled, cored and chopped
Medium to large head of garlic, finely minced
1 very large onion, minced, or two medium
1 - 1 1/2 cups dark brown sugar (to taste)
1-1/2 c. cider vinegar
1 TB. pickling salt
1 lime, zested and juiced
1 1/2 inch chunk of fresh ginger, grated on a microplane or very finely minced
Hot peppers, minced, to taste (I usually use whatever hot peppers I have fresh at the moment, and judge based on how hot the particular pepper is. When I don't have fresh ones, I buy and use 2-3 serranos)
1 tsp. cumin seeds
1 tsp. coriander seeds
1 teaspoon mustard seeds
1/2 teaspoon black mustard seeds
1/2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
1/2 teaspoon black cardamom seeds (optional)
1/2 cup golden raisins, chopped and soaked in 1/4 cup warm bourbon or whiskey

Simmer in a nonreactive pot for 1/2 to two hours, stirring every few minutes to prevent sticking/burning. Ladle into clean hot half pint jars, leave 1/4 inch headspace and process in boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.
 
2013-05-09 11:39:41 PM
When pears come into season, I like to poach them in wine and honey, then serve them with chevre with honey mixed in, and crusted with pistachios or almonds, with a nice sourdough. The poaching liquid you reserve, and then reduce to a nice thick glaze to pour over the pear, sliced thin and draped over the crusted sweet chevre, usually over some fresh greens. It makes a nice salad, and as an appetizer it sort of sets the mood for the rest of the meal.

I also like to make a faux sorbet when there are a lot of berries. Nothing so involved as a true sorbet, and really, it's the sort of thing you can make just about any time of the year. Sorbet is mostly water, but when there's an abundance of berries, just freeze the wee suckers, and puree, and add a bit of honey, and perhaps a dash of brandy or rum to keep it from setting all frozen, and simply serve from the mixer. You want a puree that is fine, and then just sweetened a bit, and only enough liqueur to give it flavor--it's not a daiquiri. Just a quick faux sorbet that you can then pack into a freezer container, and then scoop out a bit as dessert or just between courses.

When watermelons hit, I simply serve slices, with a bit of cracked black pepper--not a crust of black pepper, but a sprinkle or three. The sweetness of the melon overpowers the pepper, but the taste buds are still registering the pepper's presence. The signals get crossed in the brain though, and it tricks the brain into thinking that the melon is even sweeter than it already is. This doesn't work so well for underripe melons, which aren't quite sweet enough for this trick to work, but when they're already bursting with sweet, it is just heaven on the slice.

When grapes start rolling in, I like to use them for salsa. Especially if I can get a hold of a decent variety of grapes. Seedless and seeded grapes, you treat them like any other extra ingredient in a salsa, and chop your onion, peppers, a bit of garlic, some chili, cumin, coriander and your favorite hot sauce. Make it colorful, and a grape salsa works well with chicken or pork, or firm fish as a garnish, or finishing sauce. I prefer a rough chop, that is less sauce, and more a salad, but you can puree if you want, or reserve half of the chopped product, and puree some if you like more of a sauce consistency.

Greens as they come in, are heaven. Just a simple toss with some bacon crumbles--I am a good Southern boy so I like to do a killed salad with rendered bacon, flash the greens in the fat, deglaze with apple cider vinegar, and just wilt the greens a bit. Even a decent mesclun mix will give you enough variety of greens to give you a mix of flavor, and a killed salad, with some chopped apple, pears, maybe even some pomegranate seeds or even some fine chopped mango in with the greens as they wilt will give you some great flavor, and some fun with textures. Killed greens are great to layer, napoleon-like, with Parmesan croutons--just take Parmesan in its shredded form, and melt it into a thin disk on a flat top or in a saute pan, and then take the disk of melted cheese and set it aside to cool, and you have a disk of crispy cheese to play with. Killed greens, Parmesan crouton, and some fresh Romas and some fresh mozzarella and you've got a great summer salad.

Then there's fiddleheads...oh...delicious fiddleheads...
 
2013-05-09 11:42:07 PM
I assume this thread is for our upside-down cousins in the backwards austral reaches?

Fruit of any kind is months away here in the U S of A.
 
2013-05-09 11:52:47 PM

BuckTurgidson: I assume this thread is for our upside-down cousins in the backwards austral reaches?

Fruit of any kind is months away here in the U S of A.


Not in the south. My mom is in southern Georgia, they are harvesting strawberries and the first clingstone peaches are coming off the trees, and she says they are about 3 week or so until the first melons are ready. In Florida, it is the tail end of the citrus season. Up until recently I lived in Indian River County, and friends have been shipping me citrus and mangoes all winter. Wne I was in Florida, I grew many fruits and vegetables and got in three growing cycles each year. I planted in September, late November, and late February. You don't grow squat in south Florida in the summer. It is too hot, burns the leaves.

Hell, I'm in northern Iowa and I have rhubarb almost ready to be picked, and arctic strawberries ripening indoors.
 
2013-05-10 01:06:27 AM

electronsexparty: I prefer my fruit raw, so:

Strawberries in a spinach salad (with bell pepper, tomato, and feta- dressed with lavender balsamic vinegar and meyer lemon infused olive oil).

However, what's better than raw fruit? Why, alcohol infused with fruit, of course. It's easy.

1.) Buy fruit (I did cantaloupe.)
2.) Buy clear alcohol ( I did gin. You can do darker alcohols, but I haven't.)
3.) Put in mason jar
4.) Shake a few times a day, taste once a day
5.) Take out fruit and strain sediment
6.) Enjoy in drink or by itself

It look about 3 days for the cantaloupe to develop a good flavor. There are guides online on how long certain things take to infuse, on average.


I've seen a recipe that involves cutting a piece out of the top of a watermelon, pouring wine or vodka inside, then plugging the piece back in and letting it sit for a day of two in the fridge.
 
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