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(NBC News)   Laboratory running "secret quantum network" claims to make Internet perfectly secure. Submitter is already behind 7 proxies anyway   (science.nbcnews.com) divider line 24
    More: Unlikely, quantum, internet, self-energy, polarizations, Los Alamos National Laboratory, optical fibers, quantum cryptography, Wacky Physics  
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1327 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 May 2013 at 11:57 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-09 12:03:27 PM
Yeah, but are they seven quantum proxies?
 
2013-05-09 12:06:12 PM
As long as the hub is secure, the rest of the system is as well.

Oh so it's THEORETICAL security.
 
2013-05-09 12:11:28 PM

DoBeDoBeDo: As long as the hub is secure, the rest of the system is as well.

Oh so it's THEORETICAL security.


Um, it's basically a set of endpoint-to-hub secure connections. If either end of your connection isn't secure, it doesn't much matter how secure the link is, does it?
 
2013-05-09 12:12:02 PM

DoBeDoBeDo: As long as the hub is secure, the rest of the system is as well.

Oh so it's THEORETICAL security.


Well it's not like this setup is ever going to see the light of day, I mean they're running hub and spoke for God's sake. But the fact that they can actually make a hub that is capable of passing quantum information without compromising the security is huge, and it'll be even bigger once they figure out how to make a router that can do the same thing.
 
2013-05-09 12:16:38 PM
I don't see how a single point of failure is ever a good idea in a network system.
 
2013-05-09 12:23:30 PM

kayanlau: I don't see how a single point of failure is ever a good idea in a network system.


But it's quantum.

So it's cloud of probability functions, not a point.
 
2013-05-09 12:26:14 PM

FrancoFile: kayanlau: I don't see how a single point of failure is ever a good idea in a network system.

But it's quantum.

So it's cloud of probability functions, not a point.


If the hub is the only machine that controls all the crypto functions then when it fails the whole thig fails does it not?
 
2013-05-09 12:29:50 PM
Why the hell did I read that first as "secret aquarium network"...

...I was like "okay, are they using some random function based on the movement of multiple fish or something?"

...but at the heart of this, all this is just grant-grabbing for fed money. They biggest challenge isn't in the crypto, it's always in the application and the people using it.
 
2013-05-09 12:31:04 PM
Hah, that's nothing compared to seven Boxxies.
 
2013-05-09 12:37:12 PM

kayanlau: FrancoFile: kayanlau: I don't see how a single point of failure is ever a good idea in a network system.

But it's quantum.

So it's cloud of probability functions, not a point.

If the hub is the only machine that controls all the crypto functions then when it fails the whole thig fails does it not?


pssst....  That's the joke.
 
2013-05-09 01:22:52 PM
New Skynet Plus!

Now with Quantum Computing Power!
 
2013-05-09 01:28:28 PM
History has effectively proven that all secure technology is effectively an illusion when confronted with a 14 year old with too much time on his hands.
 
2013-05-09 01:29:10 PM
Basically, Quantum Cryptography is a *secure* method of transmitting one-time-pads, and actually has a method to determine if anyone is attempting to intercept the transimission (since their attempted interception will likely alter some of the attempted transmissions, so if you randomly check X% (don't remember the number off the top of my head), you have a near 100% chance of determining whether or not there was an eavesdropped while you were transmitting the one time pad.) Once the one time pad is transmitted, you can then securly send ANYTHING, since a one time pad, if created and used correctly, litterally cannot be broken.
 
2013-05-09 01:49:21 PM
I'd do it myself, but I'm already working on four novels at the same time and my plate is full. So here's an SF story idea for someone to run with:

Breakthroughs in quantum computing technology quickly lead to its adoption as the new standard for the worldwide net for hub-to-hub data transmission. Due to understandable caution and technical reasons, this is not done piecemeal between the different hubs. Instead, a new, parallel hub network is created and everything is switched at once.

There are problems. The entire net crashes, and everything is switched back to the original system. It is quickly discovered that there were two causes for the crash: 1) the Internet suddenly "expanded" by a factor of 10 to the 6th power, and there were suddenly a great number of duplicated ISP addresses appearing.

It is discovered that the quantum network apparently accessed not only our own Internet, but also: 1) the Internets of the a huge number of parallel universes that had also hooked up their experimental quantum networks at the same time, and 2) the already-existing 10,000 or so alien networks across our own timeline in various galaxies that had already switched to quantum computing.

(Note: quantum computing is not limited by the speed of light, since the location of an elementary particle  can be literally anywhere from one moment to the next, with a decreasing probability based on distance fro the original node.)

Earth is suddenly in conversation with 10,000,000 alternate universe human Internets and 10,000 alien Internets. What happens - socially, culturally, scientifically, theologically, etc.?  Will our civilization survive?

You're welcome. If you write it and get it published, I want credit in the acknowledgements section. Email me at h­omel­es­sg­u­y[nospam-﹫-backwards]k­n­ilhtrae­*n­et.
 
2013-05-09 02:21:43 PM

drake113: History has effectively proven that all secure technology is effectively an illusion when confronted with a 14 year old with too much time on his hands.


Or a guy willing to hit the IT security chief in the head with a wrench.
 
2013-05-09 02:36:01 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (Note: quantum computing is not limited by the speed of light, since the location of an elementary particle  can be literally anywhere from one moment to the next, with a decreasing probability based on distance fro the original node.)


Note: you fundamentally misunderstand quantum communication.

No, you can't have FTL information transfer. Not yours.
 
2013-05-09 02:42:48 PM
Quantum cryptography is a misnomer.  It's really just quantum tamper detection.  All it does is make sure that you know whether someone is listening in on your line.  Then you use the secure line to transmit a secret key.
 
2013-05-09 03:11:10 PM

jfarkinB: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (Note: quantum computing is not limited by the speed of light, since the location of an elementary particle  can be literally anywhere from one moment to the next, with a decreasing probability based on distance fro the original node.)

Note: you fundamentally misunderstand quantum communication.

No, you can't have FTL information transfer. Not yours.


Sigh. It's a science fiction yarn. And quantum communication theory is definitely not "settled science" right now.
 
2013-05-09 04:26:13 PM
www.quantumleap-alsplace.com
 
2013-05-09 04:39:19 PM
Every time this claim happened in Europe in the last decade, hackers proved it was not secure within a week. I don't have high hopes for Quantum computing anymore.
 
2013-05-09 05:03:10 PM

Arkanaut: Yeah, but are they seven quantum proxies?


Maybe
 
2013-05-09 05:53:45 PM

Kome: Arkanaut: Yeah, but are they seven quantum proxies?

Maybe


Touche.
 
2013-05-10 02:52:48 AM
Well, whether the security is there or not here depends on how I look at it...
 
2013-05-10 07:58:16 AM
The real secret to perfect security is not encryption, but the ansible. A message that doesn't travel through space doesn't have to be encrypted, because it cannot be intercepted.

This said, there's a reason the ansible is still well within the realm of science fiction.
 
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